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13 Projects, page 1 of 2

  • Canada
  • UK Research and Innovation
  • 2009

10
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/E011632/1
    Funder Contribution: 379,127 GBP
    Partners: Dalhousie University, University of Glasgow

    The cells that make up every organism are delicate and intricate machines that must carry out many complex tasks to stay alive. The single celled fungus, the budding yeast, although modest in size, shares with our cells many of these intricate mechanisms. Yeast has the huge advantage over humans in scientific research: it is relatively easy and cheap to study. Many of the insights gained into how yeast cells work apply, in one form or another, to other organisms, including ourselves. Among the key tasks shared between yeast and human cells is the ability to grow bigger without bursting. Another is to survive changes in the immediate environment that threaten lysis (bursting), such as changes in temperature or nasty chemicals. Yeast possesses one main system that senses a variety of threats to the cell's integrity and responds so as to maintain that integrity (and thereby keep the cell alive) - the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. Many of the components of this system are shared with humans but some are not - these latter may be a fungus' Achilles' heel, to which drugs could be developed that cause fungal cells (many pathogenic) to blow up (die) leaving human cells undisturbed. The CWI pathway is worth understanding. In addition, the CWI pathway presents scientific puzzles that challenge our understanding of how living systems work. Multiple signals feed into this pathway, and the pathway can activate a variety of distinct responses: how can one pathway integrate many inputs and 'decide' to make a sensible response? Key regulators of the CWI pathway are proteins called GEFs. CWI-GEFs appear to come in two distinct flavours that appear to perform distinct roles in activating the pathway. In this proposal, we seek to better understand how these GEFs are regulated, how they differ from each other both structurally and functionally and how information is processed by these GEFs to affect CWI outputs in the appropriate way. We hope to better understand how the complex and important CWI pathway is regulated.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/G00496X/1
    Funder Contribution: 527,372 GBP
    Partners: University of Waterloo (Canada), UQ, University of Leeds, University of Hertfordshire

    My research programme is the study of how relativistic effects can be exploited to improve quantum information tasks, a key topic of immense technological importance already today and more so for the next decades. The vantage point of these investigations is that the world is fundamentally both quantum and relativistic, and that these facts are immensely useful for the design of communication devices that are absolutely safe from eavesdropping, and of quantum computers that can quickly perform difficult computational tasks which overwhelm any classically imaginable computer. Indeed, impressive technological achievements and promises have already been derived from taking seriously solely the quantum aspects of matter: quantum cryptography and communication have become a technical reality in recent years, but the practical construction of a quantum computer still requires to understand better how to efficiently store, manipulate and read information, without prohibitively large disturbances from the environment. Throwing relativity into the equation fundamentally changes the entire game, as I could show in a series of research papers, one of which was featured in a generally accessible Science article highlighting my work (Cho, Science 2005). I propose to push this exciting line of theoretical research to the point where relativistic effects in quantum information theory can be exploited technologically.Far from yielding only quantitative corrections, relativity plays a dominant role in the qualitative behaviour of many physical systems used to implement quantum information tasks in the laboratory. The prototypical example is provided by any system involving light, be it for the transmission or manipulation of quantum information. There is no such thing as a non-relativistic approximation to light quanta, so-called photons, since these always travel at the speed of light. While relativistic quantum theory, commonly known as quantum field theory, is a very well studied subject in foundational particle physics, research in quantum information theory selectively focused almost exclusively on those aspects one can study without relativity. Thus both unexpected obstacles (such as a relativistic degradation of quantum entanglement) and unimagined possibilities for quantum information theory (such as improved quantum cryptography and hypersensitive quantum measurement devices) have gone unnoticed. The relevance of these insights, which together with co-workers, I afforded over the past few years, are evidenced by the amount of work by other researchers recognizing and building on my work. Indeed, the impact of my research extends beyond pure quantum information theory, and applications to foundational questions in cosmology and black hole physics have been found.The research I propose to complete during my Fellowship aims at providing comprehensive answers to foundational, theoretical and technological aspects of relativistic quantum information theory, exploiting and building on the intriguing results obtained so far. My overall aspiration and vision is to ultimately provide concrete solutions to key problems in the field of quantum information theory.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F013299/1
    Funder Contribution: 30,855 GBP
    Partners: University of Manitoba, University of Saskatchewan, Spoornet Engineering Ltd., Geotechnical Observations (United Kingdom), Road Service NI, Translink, CIRIA, Innovate UK, NUS, Mott Macdonald (United Kingdom)...

    The focus of this collaboration is to link research groups who undertake full-scale monitoring of slopes through a range of people-based activities. These include: visits of UK researchers and academics to a number of field sites both in the UK and overseas; exchanges of young researchers between UK and overseas academic institutions; secondments of researchers to industry; a dissemination workshop and the establishment of a web portal for the storage and exchange of data and for the running of on-line meetings and seminars. Despite its main focus, the collaboration will necessarily provide links between members of the extended research teams with expertise in numerical simulation, constitutive modelling, soils testing and instrumentation. It is the intention that these activities will also be linked within the wider collaborative framework created by this funding.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/C011961/1
    Funder Contribution: 483,835 GBP
    Partners: University of Leeds, McGill University

    C. elegans is one of the simplest creatures of the animal kingdom. With a mapped genome and the only mapped neural circuitry, this organism offers a first tangible opportunity to understand an entire living, behaving and learning system bottom-up and top-down. As such, it offers great promise to systems biologists, neuroscientists and roboticists alike. Despite its relative simplicity, C. elegans possesses many of the functions that are attributed to higher level organisms, including feeding, mating, complex sensory abilities, memory and learning. Can we understand the underlying engineering designs that allow this tiny nematode to survive and flourish? What insight can we gain into universal principles that give rise to adaptive and robust life-forms or to the unique architecture of its nervous system? Meeting this challenge requires a large multi-disciplinary effort, combining insight and expertise from biology, physics, engineering and computer science.The proposed research focuses on achieving a step change in our understanding of the C. elegans locomotion system and its neural control. At the modelling level, current theoretical models of the locomotion subsystem of C. elegans rely on genomic data, the known neural circuitry, limited behavioural and electrophysiological experiments on C. elegans and knowledge from other related species. All in all the knowledge base for this modelling feat is very incomplete and hence all models to date make a large number of unconfirmed assumptions. Very fundamental questions, such as whether the locomotion system relies on endogenous control in the form of central pattern generation, have recently been debated. These questions can be addressed in mathematical and simulation models; however, the physical environment (pressure, friction, sensory inputs) may be too complex to incorporate reliably in a model. I propose to construct robotic models of the nematode, incorporating alternative predicted models of neuronal circuits and to test them under a variety of physical conditions, mimicking behavioural experiments on the biological worm. This project involves three levels of investigation: First, systematic behavioural studies of the locomotion of the worm; second, the construction, analysis and simulation of detailed neurocomputational models of the locomotion system; and third, the construction of robotic models and their testing.At the technological level, probing the activity of C. elegans neurons and muscles has eluded electrophysiogists due to the mechanical properties of the worm. Hence, despite some progress, it is remarkably difficult to confirm or further develop models of neuronal subsystems such as the locomotion subsystem. At the same time, C. elegans is transparent and hence amenable to fluorescence recordings. Efforts are underway to develop voltage-sensitive dyes for sensory neurons, but to date, C. elegans neurons or muscle cells have not been fluorescently recorded from. I propose to develop molecular voltage probes to directly record the voltage-activity of C. elegans locomotion muscles. This effort builds on my preliminary work in which quantum dots (semiconductor nanoparticles) have been embedded in biological membranes. The next steps involve obtaining a voltage-response from these probes and embedding them in cells of living animals. The ability to monitor the voltage activity in behaving animals should lead to a step change in our understanding of the locomotion system in particular and the C. elegans motor system in general. Furthermore, implementation of this technology should constitute a major advance that extends much beyond the study of C. elegans to a wide range of scientific and industrial applications in both biological and bioinspired engineering domains.

  • Project . 2008 - 2009
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G009538/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,426 GBP
    Partners: The Stephen Lawrence Gallery, UEL, York University Canada, Faction Films

    The chain of events surrounding the purported discovery of a Bosnian pyramid is harnessed by a chain video camera interweaving between the dig sites and the town below...\n\nIn 2006 CNN announced to the world the discovery of the largest and potentially oldest pyramid in the world. This was not in Egypt but Visoko, in central Bosnia. If the discovery turned out to be true it would change the way we understand history. And even if it wasn't, the mere idea of pyramids in Bosnia could change the fortunes of a small town struggling to recover from a decade of war.\n\nFor 1000s of years the locals noted the pyramidal shape of the great hill overlooking the town, but not with any thought it was real, until archaeologist Semir Osmanagich, the self-proclaimed 'Indiana Jones of Bosnia,' revealed its existence. He claims that Visoko is in fact a valley comprising of four pyramids, a temple, and a network of prehistoric tunnels stretching 2.5 km underground.\n\nVisoko has become a Brigadoon, embracing the pyramid theory with gusto, transforming itself economically through new enterprise. The town now has an archaeological park and a burgeoning tourist agency based on the pyramids. To date some 50,000 tourists have visited the town and Pyramid sites. The Hotel Hollywood has been renamed The Pyramid of the Sun Hotel. Behind the Mayor's desk is a picture of a sphinx. You can eat Pyramid Pizzas in an Aztec styled restaurant. But the archaeological dig sites are constantly in a state of start and stop and there is no certainty that Visoko will retain world attention.\n\nThis research project does not set out to represent the discovery of the pyramids nor to prove or disprove their existence. The landscape itself seems beyond containment and any efforts to depict the pyramids fall short of the phenomena. The standard fact-finding format of TV news has failed to capture this faith-based narrative. The real story has yet to be told, not of the pyramids, but of Visoko, an ordinary town reinventing itself around an extraordinary set of events. Everything about Visoko invites reinvention. This is why Buried Land is concerned with multiple narratives and multiple truths. \n\nA surreal situation requires a surreal approach, the meeting of visions with visions, and so I will encounter the imaginary head on, combining documentary and fiction techniques. The central concept for Buried Land is the construction of a human chain stretching around the town to the foothills and the summit of the pyramid. A camera is passed from hand to hand along this chain, recording a gigantic filmed take. The function of the chain is both to echo the enterprise and the conceit of the Pyramid Foundation and to provide an initial purpose for a film production, one which will increasingly be taken-up by the participants in the chain. Along with the principal investigator, members of the community will co-author filmed sequences that utilise reenactment and fictional elements, as well as images of actuality. Narratives retraced by the people of the town will tell the stories of key characters - the small and large players in the events - introducing visionary sequences, unearthing the town to find what lies beneath. All of the characters and situations hang from the chain like pendants on a necklace.\n\nThe chain and the resultant film is a reflection of the scale and scope of the event the film has as its subject: the pyramid. Like the pyramid, the chain is the enigma that motivates the camera to question and gather fragments. It prises open the stories of the town, moving with a domino effect, passing through windows, ignoring public and private boundaries. It interweaves between scenes conveying the cultural and political complexity of the pyramid claim, depositing the viewer at situations. \n\nBuried Land enters the world of 'belief archaeology.' How will the camera chain illuminate the event of the pyramid? Is the emperor without clothes? What is under the hill?

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F013221/1
    Funder Contribution: 95,973 GBP
    Partners: NUS, Newcastle University, Translink, UMINHO, Mas Networks Ltd, Spoornet Engineering Ltd., University of Manitoba, University of Saskatchewan, Highways Agency, Mott Macdonald (United Kingdom)...

    SummaryThe focus of this collaboration is to link research groups who undertake full-scale monitoring of slopes through a range of people-based activities. These include: visits of UK researchers and academics to a number of field sites both in the UK and overseas; exchanges of young researchers between UK and overseas academic institutions; secondments of researchers to industry; a dissemination workshop and the establishment of a web portal for the storage and exchange of data and for the running of on-line meetings and seminars. Despite its main focus, the collaboration will necessarily provide links between members of the extended research teams with expertise in numerical simulation, constitutive modelling, soils testing and instrumentation. It is the intention that these activities will also be linked within the wider collaborative framework created by this funding.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/D000017/1
    Funder Contribution: 141,896 GBP
    Partners: University of Bath, Alias

    The modelling and animation of characters, human or otherwise, is a huge and rapidly growing field. The success of movies such as those made by Pixar and the massive computer games market has led to a need for more realistic character modelling and animation, and this realism is demanded in shorter timescales. This is apparent from the large number of computer animated TV series, such as Jimmy Neutron and Excalibur, which have short production times to satisfy the consumer demand.An important point to note is that existing modelling and animation techniques are time consuming and non-intuitive in the vast majority of situations. In this research we propose to develop novel techniques to address these issues. We propose to develop a system that will offer two distinct advantages over existing techniques. Firstly, we propose to adopt a modelling technique that will allow intuitive generation and manipulation of complex geometry. Secondly, and rather more importantly, we propose to develop techniques which would allow both the modelling and animation process to be based on the same underlying geometry model.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/D032008/1
    Funder Contribution: 233,161 GBP
    Partners: LMUK Insys Ltd, Sunnybrook Technologies Inc, University of Bradford

    The computer graphics industry, and in particular those involved with films, games, simulation, virtual reality and military applications, continue to demand more realistic computer-generated images, that is computed images that more accurately match the real scene they are intended to represent. This is particularly challenging when considering images of the natural world, which presents our visual system with a wide range of colours and intensities. In most real scenes, for example, looking from inside a house towards a window, the ratio between the darkest areas (e.g. inside the room) and the brightest area (outside the window), the so-called contrast ratio, could be many thousands to one. A typical computer monitor only has a contrast ratio of about 100:1 and is thus incapable of accurately displaying such scenes.A number of appearance-preserving, or tone-mapping, operators (TMOs) have been developed in order to try to achieve a perceptual match between the real-world scene and what is displayed on the computer monitor. However, it has not yet been possible to validate the fidelity of these TMOs thoroughly against the real scenes they are trying to portray. The recent development of novel, high dynamic range (HDR) displays, capable of 75,000:1 contrast ratio now provide the opportunity to compute and display computer-generated images that are perceptually much closer to the real world.This research proposal will use these novel HDR displays to evaluate existing TMOs to see how well they do preserve the appearance of the real scenes, and will use the insights gained to develop new, more accurate TMOs for existing computer monitors and HDR displays. A framework will also be produced that will provide a straightforward, objective way of comparing real and synthetic images. Two applications, which are critically dependent on the realism of computed images, are virtual archaeology and military simulations. When investigating past environments on a computer, failure to produce images that accurately match what the past environment may have looked like, may in fact lead to the archaeologists misinterpreting the past. Similarly, the incorrect display of a military vehicle attempting to camouflage in a certain terrain may lead to detection of the vehicle in the real battlefield scenario. We will use specific examples from archaeology and camouflage to test the results of our research.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E009972/1
    Funder Contribution: 411,124 GBP
    Partners: University of Toronto, University of Glasgow

    This project proposal addresses an emerging demand for lowcost, compact and flexible optical sources in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength regions due particularly to increasing need for sensing applications, e.g. environmental, clinical analysis, life sciences, food monitoring, pharmaceutical, security and forensics. The principal advantage of the frequency conversion approach introduced here is that the wavelength to be generated is not fixed at the wafer growth stage, but is instead determined by lithography in the post-growth processing. As such it is feasible to conceive of several devices, each with modest tunability, monolithically integrated on a single semiconductor chip. This research builds on key technologies where we already have an extensive track record in semiconductor nonlinear optics, semiconductor ring lasers and III-V integration technologies. The minaturisation of infrared optical sources, in comparison to large and expensive desktop systems, will be enabled by fabricating the frequency conversion element within a high finesse semiconductor ring laser cavity.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F013191/1
    Funder Contribution: 30,651 GBP
    Partners: NUS, Highways Agency, University of Southampton, Spoornet Engineering Ltd., Mas Networks Ltd, Translink, Road Service NI, UMINHO, University of Manitoba, University of Saskatchewan...

    The focus of this collaboration is to link research groups who undertake full-scale monitoring of slopes through a range of people-based activities. These include: visits of UK researchers and academics to a number of field sites both in the UK and overseas; exchanges of young researchers between UK and overseas academic institutions; secondments of researchers to industry; a dissemination workshop and the establishment of a web portal for the storage and exchange of data and for the running of on-line meetings and seminars. Despite its main focus, the collaboration will necessarily provide links between members of the extended research teams with expertise in numerical simulation, constitutive modelling, soils testing and instrumentation. It is the intention that these activities will also be linked within the wider collaborative framework created by this funding.

Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
13 Projects, page 1 of 2
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: BB/E011632/1
    Funder Contribution: 379,127 GBP
    Partners: Dalhousie University, University of Glasgow

    The cells that make up every organism are delicate and intricate machines that must carry out many complex tasks to stay alive. The single celled fungus, the budding yeast, although modest in size, shares with our cells many of these intricate mechanisms. Yeast has the huge advantage over humans in scientific research: it is relatively easy and cheap to study. Many of the insights gained into how yeast cells work apply, in one form or another, to other organisms, including ourselves. Among the key tasks shared between yeast and human cells is the ability to grow bigger without bursting. Another is to survive changes in the immediate environment that threaten lysis (bursting), such as changes in temperature or nasty chemicals. Yeast possesses one main system that senses a variety of threats to the cell's integrity and responds so as to maintain that integrity (and thereby keep the cell alive) - the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway. Many of the components of this system are shared with humans but some are not - these latter may be a fungus' Achilles' heel, to which drugs could be developed that cause fungal cells (many pathogenic) to blow up (die) leaving human cells undisturbed. The CWI pathway is worth understanding. In addition, the CWI pathway presents scientific puzzles that challenge our understanding of how living systems work. Multiple signals feed into this pathway, and the pathway can activate a variety of distinct responses: how can one pathway integrate many inputs and 'decide' to make a sensible response? Key regulators of the CWI pathway are proteins called GEFs. CWI-GEFs appear to come in two distinct flavours that appear to perform distinct roles in activating the pathway. In this proposal, we seek to better understand how these GEFs are regulated, how they differ from each other both structurally and functionally and how information is processed by these GEFs to affect CWI outputs in the appropriate way. We hope to better understand how the complex and important CWI pathway is regulated.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/G00496X/1
    Funder Contribution: 527,372 GBP
    Partners: University of Waterloo (Canada), UQ, University of Leeds, University of Hertfordshire

    My research programme is the study of how relativistic effects can be exploited to improve quantum information tasks, a key topic of immense technological importance already today and more so for the next decades. The vantage point of these investigations is that the world is fundamentally both quantum and relativistic, and that these facts are immensely useful for the design of communication devices that are absolutely safe from eavesdropping, and of quantum computers that can quickly perform difficult computational tasks which overwhelm any classically imaginable computer. Indeed, impressive technological achievements and promises have already been derived from taking seriously solely the quantum aspects of matter: quantum cryptography and communication have become a technical reality in recent years, but the practical construction of a quantum computer still requires to understand better how to efficiently store, manipulate and read information, without prohibitively large disturbances from the environment. Throwing relativity into the equation fundamentally changes the entire game, as I could show in a series of research papers, one of which was featured in a generally accessible Science article highlighting my work (Cho, Science 2005). I propose to push this exciting line of theoretical research to the point where relativistic effects in quantum information theory can be exploited technologically.Far from yielding only quantitative corrections, relativity plays a dominant role in the qualitative behaviour of many physical systems used to implement quantum information tasks in the laboratory. The prototypical example is provided by any system involving light, be it for the transmission or manipulation of quantum information. There is no such thing as a non-relativistic approximation to light quanta, so-called photons, since these always travel at the speed of light. While relativistic quantum theory, commonly known as quantum field theory, is a very well studied subject in foundational particle physics, research in quantum information theory selectively focused almost exclusively on those aspects one can study without relativity. Thus both unexpected obstacles (such as a relativistic degradation of quantum entanglement) and unimagined possibilities for quantum information theory (such as improved quantum cryptography and hypersensitive quantum measurement devices) have gone unnoticed. The relevance of these insights, which together with co-workers, I afforded over the past few years, are evidenced by the amount of work by other researchers recognizing and building on my work. Indeed, the impact of my research extends beyond pure quantum information theory, and applications to foundational questions in cosmology and black hole physics have been found.The research I propose to complete during my Fellowship aims at providing comprehensive answers to foundational, theoretical and technological aspects of relativistic quantum information theory, exploiting and building on the intriguing results obtained so far. My overall aspiration and vision is to ultimately provide concrete solutions to key problems in the field of quantum information theory.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F013299/1
    Funder Contribution: 30,855 GBP
    Partners: University of Manitoba, University of Saskatchewan, Spoornet Engineering Ltd., Geotechnical Observations (United Kingdom), Road Service NI, Translink, CIRIA, Innovate UK, NUS, Mott Macdonald (United Kingdom)...

    The focus of this collaboration is to link research groups who undertake full-scale monitoring of slopes through a range of people-based activities. These include: visits of UK researchers and academics to a number of field sites both in the UK and overseas; exchanges of young researchers between UK and overseas academic institutions; secondments of researchers to industry; a dissemination workshop and the establishment of a web portal for the storage and exchange of data and for the running of on-line meetings and seminars. Despite its main focus, the collaboration will necessarily provide links between members of the extended research teams with expertise in numerical simulation, constitutive modelling, soils testing and instrumentation. It is the intention that these activities will also be linked within the wider collaborative framework created by this funding.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/C011961/1
    Funder Contribution: 483,835 GBP
    Partners: University of Leeds, McGill University

    C. elegans is one of the simplest creatures of the animal kingdom. With a mapped genome and the only mapped neural circuitry, this organism offers a first tangible opportunity to understand an entire living, behaving and learning system bottom-up and top-down. As such, it offers great promise to systems biologists, neuroscientists and roboticists alike. Despite its relative simplicity, C. elegans possesses many of the functions that are attributed to higher level organisms, including feeding, mating, complex sensory abilities, memory and learning. Can we understand the underlying engineering designs that allow this tiny nematode to survive and flourish? What insight can we gain into universal principles that give rise to adaptive and robust life-forms or to the unique architecture of its nervous system? Meeting this challenge requires a large multi-disciplinary effort, combining insight and expertise from biology, physics, engineering and computer science.The proposed research focuses on achieving a step change in our understanding of the C. elegans locomotion system and its neural control. At the modelling level, current theoretical models of the locomotion subsystem of C. elegans rely on genomic data, the known neural circuitry, limited behavioural and electrophysiological experiments on C. elegans and knowledge from other related species. All in all the knowledge base for this modelling feat is very incomplete and hence all models to date make a large number of unconfirmed assumptions. Very fundamental questions, such as whether the locomotion system relies on endogenous control in the form of central pattern generation, have recently been debated. These questions can be addressed in mathematical and simulation models; however, the physical environment (pressure, friction, sensory inputs) may be too complex to incorporate reliably in a model. I propose to construct robotic models of the nematode, incorporating alternative predicted models of neuronal circuits and to test them under a variety of physical conditions, mimicking behavioural experiments on the biological worm. This project involves three levels of investigation: First, systematic behavioural studies of the locomotion of the worm; second, the construction, analysis and simulation of detailed neurocomputational models of the locomotion system; and third, the construction of robotic models and their testing.At the technological level, probing the activity of C. elegans neurons and muscles has eluded electrophysiogists due to the mechanical properties of the worm. Hence, despite some progress, it is remarkably difficult to confirm or further develop models of neuronal subsystems such as the locomotion subsystem. At the same time, C. elegans is transparent and hence amenable to fluorescence recordings. Efforts are underway to develop voltage-sensitive dyes for sensory neurons, but to date, C. elegans neurons or muscle cells have not been fluorescently recorded from. I propose to develop molecular voltage probes to directly record the voltage-activity of C. elegans locomotion muscles. This effort builds on my preliminary work in which quantum dots (semiconductor nanoparticles) have been embedded in biological membranes. The next steps involve obtaining a voltage-response from these probes and embedding them in cells of living animals. The ability to monitor the voltage activity in behaving animals should lead to a step change in our understanding of the locomotion system in particular and the C. elegans motor system in general. Furthermore, implementation of this technology should constitute a major advance that extends much beyond the study of C. elegans to a wide range of scientific and industrial applications in both biological and bioinspired engineering domains.

  • Project . 2008 - 2009
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/G009538/1
    Funder Contribution: 16,426 GBP
    Partners: The Stephen Lawrence Gallery, UEL, York University Canada, Faction Films

    The chain of events surrounding the purported discovery of a Bosnian pyramid is harnessed by a chain video camera interweaving between the dig sites and the town below...\n\nIn 2006 CNN announced to the world the discovery of the largest and potentially oldest pyramid in the world. This was not in Egypt but Visoko, in central Bosnia. If the discovery turned out to be true it would change the way we understand history. And even if it wasn't, the mere idea of pyramids in Bosnia could change the fortunes of a small town struggling to recover from a decade of war.\n\nFor 1000s of years the locals noted the pyramidal shape of the great hill overlooking the town, but not with any thought it was real, until archaeologist Semir Osmanagich, the self-proclaimed 'Indiana Jones of Bosnia,' revealed its existence. He claims that Visoko is in fact a valley comprising of four pyramids, a temple, and a network of prehistoric tunnels stretching 2.5 km underground.\n\nVisoko has become a Brigadoon, embracing the pyramid theory with gusto, transforming itself economically through new enterprise. The town now has an archaeological park and a burgeoning tourist agency based on the pyramids. To date some 50,000 tourists have visited the town and Pyramid sites. The Hotel Hollywood has been renamed The Pyramid of the Sun Hotel. Behind the Mayor's desk is a picture of a sphinx. You can eat Pyramid Pizzas in an Aztec styled restaurant. But the archaeological dig sites are constantly in a state of start and stop and there is no certainty that Visoko will retain world attention.\n\nThis research project does not set out to represent the discovery of the pyramids nor to prove or disprove their existence. The landscape itself seems beyond containment and any efforts to depict the pyramids fall short of the phenomena. The standard fact-finding format of TV news has failed to capture this faith-based narrative. The real story has yet to be told, not of the pyramids, but of Visoko, an ordinary town reinventing itself around an extraordinary set of events. Everything about Visoko invites reinvention. This is why Buried Land is concerned with multiple narratives and multiple truths. \n\nA surreal situation requires a surreal approach, the meeting of visions with visions, and so I will encounter the imaginary head on, combining documentary and fiction techniques. The central concept for Buried Land is the construction of a human chain stretching around the town to the foothills and the summit of the pyramid. A camera is passed from hand to hand along this chain, recording a gigantic filmed take. The function of the chain is both to echo the enterprise and the conceit of the Pyramid Foundation and to provide an initial purpose for a film production, one which will increasingly be taken-up by the participants in the chain. Along with the principal investigator, members of the community will co-author filmed sequences that utilise reenactment and fictional elements, as well as images of actuality. Narratives retraced by the people of the town will tell the stories of key characters - the small and large players in the events - introducing visionary sequences, unearthing the town to find what lies beneath. All of the characters and situations hang from the chain like pendants on a necklace.\n\nThe chain and the resultant film is a reflection of the scale and scope of the event the film has as its subject: the pyramid. Like the pyramid, the chain is the enigma that motivates the camera to question and gather fragments. It prises open the stories of the town, moving with a domino effect, passing through windows, ignoring public and private boundaries. It interweaves between scenes conveying the cultural and political complexity of the pyramid claim, depositing the viewer at situations. \n\nBuried Land enters the world of 'belief archaeology.' How will the camera chain illuminate the event of the pyramid? Is the emperor without clothes? What is under the hill?

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F013221/1
    Funder Contribution: 95,973 GBP
    Partners: NUS, Newcastle University, Translink, UMINHO, Mas Networks Ltd, Spoornet Engineering Ltd., University of Manitoba, University of Saskatchewan, Highways Agency, Mott Macdonald (United Kingdom)...

    SummaryThe focus of this collaboration is to link research groups who undertake full-scale monitoring of slopes through a range of people-based activities. These include: visits of UK researchers and academics to a number of field sites both in the UK and overseas; exchanges of young researchers between UK and overseas academic institutions; secondments of researchers to industry; a dissemination workshop and the establishment of a web portal for the storage and exchange of data and for the running of on-line meetings and seminars. Despite its main focus, the collaboration will necessarily provide links between members of the extended research teams with expertise in numerical simulation, constitutive modelling, soils testing and instrumentation. It is the intention that these activities will also be linked within the wider collaborative framework created by this funding.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/D000017/1
    Funder Contribution: 141,896 GBP
    Partners: University of Bath, Alias

    The modelling and animation of characters, human or otherwise, is a huge and rapidly growing field. The success of movies such as those made by Pixar and the massive computer games market has led to a need for more realistic character modelling and animation, and this realism is demanded in shorter timescales. This is apparent from the large number of computer animated TV series, such as Jimmy Neutron and Excalibur, which have short production times to satisfy the consumer demand.An important point to note is that existing modelling and animation techniques are time consuming and non-intuitive in the vast majority of situations. In this research we propose to develop novel techniques to address these issues. We propose to develop a system that will offer two distinct advantages over existing techniques. Firstly, we propose to adopt a modelling technique that will allow intuitive generation and manipulation of complex geometry. Secondly, and rather more importantly, we propose to develop techniques which would allow both the modelling and animation process to be based on the same underlying geometry model.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/D032008/1
    Funder Contribution: 233,161 GBP
    Partners: LMUK Insys Ltd, Sunnybrook Technologies Inc, University of Bradford

    The computer graphics industry, and in particular those involved with films, games, simulation, virtual reality and military applications, continue to demand more realistic computer-generated images, that is computed images that more accurately match the real scene they are intended to represent. This is particularly challenging when considering images of the natural world, which presents our visual system with a wide range of colours and intensities. In most real scenes, for example, looking from inside a house towards a window, the ratio between the darkest areas (e.g. inside the room) and the brightest area (outside the window), the so-called contrast ratio, could be many thousands to one. A typical computer monitor only has a contrast ratio of about 100:1 and is thus incapable of accurately displaying such scenes.A number of appearance-preserving, or tone-mapping, operators (TMOs) have been developed in order to try to achieve a perceptual match between the real-world scene and what is displayed on the computer monitor. However, it has not yet been possible to validate the fidelity of these TMOs thoroughly against the real scenes they are trying to portray. The recent development of novel, high dynamic range (HDR) displays, capable of 75,000:1 contrast ratio now provide the opportunity to compute and display computer-generated images that are perceptually much closer to the real world.This research proposal will use these novel HDR displays to evaluate existing TMOs to see how well they do preserve the appearance of the real scenes, and will use the insights gained to develop new, more accurate TMOs for existing computer monitors and HDR displays. A framework will also be produced that will provide a straightforward, objective way of comparing real and synthetic images. Two applications, which are critically dependent on the realism of computed images, are virtual archaeology and military simulations. When investigating past environments on a computer, failure to produce images that accurately match what the past environment may have looked like, may in fact lead to the archaeologists misinterpreting the past. Similarly, the incorrect display of a military vehicle attempting to camouflage in a certain terrain may lead to detection of the vehicle in the real battlefield scenario. We will use specific examples from archaeology and camouflage to test the results of our research.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E009972/1
    Funder Contribution: 411,124 GBP
    Partners: University of Toronto, University of Glasgow

    This project proposal addresses an emerging demand for lowcost, compact and flexible optical sources in the near- and mid-infrared wavelength regions due particularly to increasing need for sensing applications, e.g. environmental, clinical analysis, life sciences, food monitoring, pharmaceutical, security and forensics. The principal advantage of the frequency conversion approach introduced here is that the wavelength to be generated is not fixed at the wafer growth stage, but is instead determined by lithography in the post-growth processing. As such it is feasible to conceive of several devices, each with modest tunability, monolithically integrated on a single semiconductor chip. This research builds on key technologies where we already have an extensive track record in semiconductor nonlinear optics, semiconductor ring lasers and III-V integration technologies. The minaturisation of infrared optical sources, in comparison to large and expensive desktop systems, will be enabled by fabricating the frequency conversion element within a high finesse semiconductor ring laser cavity.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/F013191/1
    Funder Contribution: 30,651 GBP
    Partners: NUS, Highways Agency, University of Southampton, Spoornet Engineering Ltd., Mas Networks Ltd, Translink, Road Service NI, UMINHO, University of Manitoba, University of Saskatchewan...

    The focus of this collaboration is to link research groups who undertake full-scale monitoring of slopes through a range of people-based activities. These include: visits of UK researchers and academics to a number of field sites both in the UK and overseas; exchanges of young researchers between UK and overseas academic institutions; secondments of researchers to industry; a dissemination workshop and the establishment of a web portal for the storage and exchange of data and for the running of on-line meetings and seminars. Despite its main focus, the collaboration will necessarily provide links between members of the extended research teams with expertise in numerical simulation, constitutive modelling, soils testing and instrumentation. It is the intention that these activities will also be linked within the wider collaborative framework created by this funding.