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The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
7 Projects, page 1 of 1

  • Canada
  • 2010
  • 2010

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 128212
    Funder Contribution: 61,700
    Partners: The University of British Columbia Department of Pediatrics B.C. Children's Hospital
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 129469
    Funder Contribution: 24,200
    Partners: Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche développement sur l'education permanante Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 129415
    Funder Contribution: 57,950
    Partners: Group of Dr. John Dick Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology University of Toronto
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 093837
    Funder Contribution: 4,936 GBP
    Partners: UBC

    The proposed visit has two main aims. The first is to disseminate Interior Traces1 which uses multimedia drama to explore issues in neuroethics to the Canadian Neuroethics community and local public audiences. Dr Whiteley will run a series of screenings, targetingneurology and psychiatry residents, undergraduate students in medicine and law, members of NeuroDevNet2, and the general public, accompanied by Café Scientifique-style discussions. She will also give seminars, and gather feedback that will contribute to a journal submission on the use of fictional narratives to explore bioethical issues. The second aim is to extend Dr Whiteley's previous research on what the representation of brain imaging in popular culture might reveal about anxieties surrounding neural and genetic determinism and identity. She will write up existing research, and collaborate on a new project contributing to our ongoing work atthe National Core for Neuroethics, systematically examining the use of images on websites that sell direct-toconsumer scans and treatments for mental illness and neural disorder. Dr Whiteley's visit will thus contribute new perspectives to the local neuroethics community and public communication landscape, as well as extending her skills and publication record in neuroethics research.

  • Project . 2010 - 2010
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/H05197X/1
    Funder Contribution: 17,565 GBP
    Partners: University of Michigan–Flint, CNRC, University of Sheffield

    The aerospace industry is striving to design lighter structures to give higher payloads, lower carbon emissions, and improved fuel efficiency. In order to do this, materials must be used as efficiently as possible, and so it is essential that their behaviour under load is fully understood. Traditional engineering design uses laboratory data to determine the dimensions of structural elements. In many cases these data are from simplified testing of cracked samples and can be very conservative. This can lead to over-engineered components which weigh more than the optimum design.The work proposes to develop experimental techniques capable of generating data that can be used to model actual, lightweight, safety-critical components. Examples of such components are wing skin panels, which, with their array of stiffeners and holes, present a complex loading problem, where any cracks are subjected to loads in several directions thereby altering their direction of growth.Two experimental techniques will be studied: Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In TSA, temperature changes experienced by a structure under cyclic loading are measured. These changes in temperature are caused by the applied loads and their magnitude is proportional to the sum of the principal stresses on the surface of the structure. DIC, on the other hand, uses a high resolution digital camera to track surface features in three dimensions. The images are analysed to determine the relative displacements due to loading. Both these techniques can be used to determine the mechanisms of crack propagation through a metallic or composite structure loaded simultaneously in more than one direction.It is proposed to spend three months in North America using the TSA and DIC methodologies to investigate crack tip stress fields under biaxial loads in both metallic and composite materials. This work will be used to improve understanding of the relationship between different load magnitudes, loading modes, and plastic crack tip behaviour. Another key output will be the establishment of future collaborative research projects. The majority of the trip will be spent at the Composite Vehicle Research Centre (CVRC) at Michigan State University, USA. An invitation has also been received to visit the Structures and Materials Performance Laboratory at the Institute for Aerospace Research (IAR) in Ottawa, Canada. The CVRC has established a comprehensive array of laboratory facilities for testing materials and components, with a suite of state-of-the-art optical experimental mechanics equipment. The IAR is part of the National Research Council Canada, the Canadian government's organisation for research and development and has extensive research facilities in experimental mechanics, including interests in DIC and TSA, with applications in a range of aerospace structures. Both these world-leading research institutions offer the potential to develop first class research partnerships in key cross-functional, and industrially relevant disciplines.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 129069
    Funder Contribution: 30,200
    Partners: Faculty of Law University of Toronto
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 130939
    Funder Contribution: 44,400
    Partners: Human Performance Laboratory The University of Calgary
Advanced search in
Projects
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
7 Projects, page 1 of 1
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 128212
    Funder Contribution: 61,700
    Partners: The University of British Columbia Department of Pediatrics B.C. Children's Hospital
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 129469
    Funder Contribution: 24,200
    Partners: Centre interdisciplinaire de recherche développement sur l'education permanante Université du Québec à Montréal
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 129415
    Funder Contribution: 57,950
    Partners: Group of Dr. John Dick Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology University of Toronto
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 093837
    Funder Contribution: 4,936 GBP
    Partners: UBC

    The proposed visit has two main aims. The first is to disseminate Interior Traces1 which uses multimedia drama to explore issues in neuroethics to the Canadian Neuroethics community and local public audiences. Dr Whiteley will run a series of screenings, targetingneurology and psychiatry residents, undergraduate students in medicine and law, members of NeuroDevNet2, and the general public, accompanied by Café Scientifique-style discussions. She will also give seminars, and gather feedback that will contribute to a journal submission on the use of fictional narratives to explore bioethical issues. The second aim is to extend Dr Whiteley's previous research on what the representation of brain imaging in popular culture might reveal about anxieties surrounding neural and genetic determinism and identity. She will write up existing research, and collaborate on a new project contributing to our ongoing work atthe National Core for Neuroethics, systematically examining the use of images on websites that sell direct-toconsumer scans and treatments for mental illness and neural disorder. Dr Whiteley's visit will thus contribute new perspectives to the local neuroethics community and public communication landscape, as well as extending her skills and publication record in neuroethics research.

  • Project . 2010 - 2010
    Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/H05197X/1
    Funder Contribution: 17,565 GBP
    Partners: University of Michigan–Flint, CNRC, University of Sheffield

    The aerospace industry is striving to design lighter structures to give higher payloads, lower carbon emissions, and improved fuel efficiency. In order to do this, materials must be used as efficiently as possible, and so it is essential that their behaviour under load is fully understood. Traditional engineering design uses laboratory data to determine the dimensions of structural elements. In many cases these data are from simplified testing of cracked samples and can be very conservative. This can lead to over-engineered components which weigh more than the optimum design.The work proposes to develop experimental techniques capable of generating data that can be used to model actual, lightweight, safety-critical components. Examples of such components are wing skin panels, which, with their array of stiffeners and holes, present a complex loading problem, where any cracks are subjected to loads in several directions thereby altering their direction of growth.Two experimental techniques will be studied: Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) and Digital Image Correlation (DIC). In TSA, temperature changes experienced by a structure under cyclic loading are measured. These changes in temperature are caused by the applied loads and their magnitude is proportional to the sum of the principal stresses on the surface of the structure. DIC, on the other hand, uses a high resolution digital camera to track surface features in three dimensions. The images are analysed to determine the relative displacements due to loading. Both these techniques can be used to determine the mechanisms of crack propagation through a metallic or composite structure loaded simultaneously in more than one direction.It is proposed to spend three months in North America using the TSA and DIC methodologies to investigate crack tip stress fields under biaxial loads in both metallic and composite materials. This work will be used to improve understanding of the relationship between different load magnitudes, loading modes, and plastic crack tip behaviour. Another key output will be the establishment of future collaborative research projects. The majority of the trip will be spent at the Composite Vehicle Research Centre (CVRC) at Michigan State University, USA. An invitation has also been received to visit the Structures and Materials Performance Laboratory at the Institute for Aerospace Research (IAR) in Ottawa, Canada. The CVRC has established a comprehensive array of laboratory facilities for testing materials and components, with a suite of state-of-the-art optical experimental mechanics equipment. The IAR is part of the National Research Council Canada, the Canadian government's organisation for research and development and has extensive research facilities in experimental mechanics, including interests in DIC and TSA, with applications in a range of aerospace structures. Both these world-leading research institutions offer the potential to develop first class research partnerships in key cross-functional, and industrially relevant disciplines.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 129069
    Funder Contribution: 30,200
    Partners: Faculty of Law University of Toronto
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 130939
    Funder Contribution: 44,400
    Partners: Human Performance Laboratory The University of Calgary