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20 Projects

  • Canada
  • 2021-2021
  • OA Publications Mandate: Yes
  • 2021

10
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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 634935
    Overall Budget: 6,460,000 EURFunder Contribution: 6,200,000 EUR

    Breast cancer affects more than 360,000 women per year in the EU and causes more than 90,000 deaths. Identification of women at high risk of the disease can lead to disease prevention through intensive screening, chemoprevention or prophylactic surgery. Breast cancer risk is determined by a combination of genetic and lifestyle risk factors. The advent of next generation sequencing has opened up the opportunity for testing in many disease genes, and diagnostic gene panel testing is being introduced in many EU countries. However, the cancer risks associated with most variants in most genes are unknown. This leads to a major problem in appropriate counselling and management of women undergoing panel testing. In this project, we aim to build a knowledge base that will allow identification of women at high-risk of breast cancer, in particular through comprehensive evaluation of DNA variants in known and suspected breast cancer genes. We will exploit the huge resources established through the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and ENIGMA (Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles). We will expand the existing datasets by sequencing all known breast cancer susceptibility genes in 20,000 breast cancer cases and 20,000 controls from population-based studies, and 10,000 cases from multiple case families. Sequence data will be integrated with in-silico and functional data, with data on other known risk factors, to generate a comprehensive risk model that can provide personalised risk estimates. We will develop online tools to aid the interpretation of gene variants and provide risk estimates in a user-friendly format, to help genetic counsellors and patients worldwide to make informed clinical decisions. We will evaluate the acceptability and utility of comprehensive gene panel testing in the clinical genetics context.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 643417
    Overall Budget: 30,953,000 EURFunder Contribution: 10,000,000 EUR

    Over 12 million people in Europe suffer from neurodegenerative diseases (ND), yet treatments that prevent or stop the progression of neurodegeneration are still lacking. Tackling this grand challenge requires enhanced coordination of national efforts to accelerate discovery. Such synergies have been created among 28 countries in the pilot EU JPI on Neurodegenerative Disease Research (JPND). JPND has a long standing experience in collaborative action with €75 million of additional national funds being successfully mobilized between 2011 and 2014 to support transnational research programs. The JPND Research Strategy is now ripe for further enhancement in tight coordination with the EC through an ERA-Net Cofund instrument JPco-fuND with an unprecedented commitment of €30 million of national funds associated to a highly incentivizing EC top-up fund. Among the most burning questions, three priority topics have emerged through a consultative process between researchers and JPND members in order to unlock several major issues within ND research: the identification of genetic, epigenetic and environmental risk and protective factors, the development and maintenance of longitudinal cohorts, the creation of advanced experimental models. These are key questions of equal priority to increase understanding of ND mechanisms that will be addressed through a common joint transnational call allowing a significant acceleration of the execution of the JPND research strategy. Moreover, to expand the impact of JPco-fuND, JPND will continue to implement other actions without EU co-funding such as aligning national research strategies, making databases more accessible and interoperable, developing enabling capacities such as supportive infrastructure and platforms, capacity building, education and training. These actions are required in parallel to achieve the highest impact for the patients, their carers and for society as whole and address this grand challenge in the coming years.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 678732
    Overall Budget: 6,915,510 EURFunder Contribution: 6,915,510 EUR

    PROMISS (PRevention Of Malnutrition In Senior Subjects in the EU) is a multi-country project aiming to turn the challenge of tackling malnutrition in community-dwelling older persons into an opportunity for healthy ageing for the future. The PROMISS consortium contains worldwide expertise in epidemiology, clinical trials, geriatrics, nutrition, physical activity, microbiomics, as well as in behaviour, consumer, sensory and computer sciences. It builds on strong collaborations with food industry and SMEs to strengthen innovation of the European agri-food sector and their market position. Existing data from scientifically well-established prospective aging cohorts and national nutritional surveys from Europe and ‘third countries’ will be combined with new data from short- and long-term intervention studies in older persons at risk. Its holistic approach will provide insight in the causality of the links between diet, physical activity, appetite and malnutrition and underlying pathways, thereby providing the necessary evidence to develop optimal, sustainable and evidence-based dietary and physical activity strategies to prevent malnutrition and enhance active and healthy aging. PROMISS will also deliver food concepts and products as well as persuasive technology to support adherence to these strategies. The dietary and physical activity strategies and food products will be specifically developed with older user involvement to meet the needs and fit the preferences of older consumers. In close collaboration with stakeholders, PROMISS will translate these strategies into practical recommendations to guide policy and health professionals at EU- and Member States level. Dissemination and implementation takes place through strong dissemination partners operating on an European level and linked to national networks across Member States. PROMISS promises prevention of malnutrition, additional healthy life years and a strengthening of EU’s food industry

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 874434
    Overall Budget: 369,300 EURFunder Contribution: 300,000 EUR

    Research infrastructures are key enablers in all areas of research and technology development and, as such, are crucial to advancing the frontiers of knowledge. RIs are increasingly used by researchers from numerous countries and are often operated by international consortia. The necessary expenditures for research infrastructures take up a significant portion of overall research budgets and they are constantly under pressure to adapt due to the advancements in science, research and technology. All these aspects underline the importance of research infrastructures. They also demonstrate the complexity that occur with construction, implementation, governance, operation, funding and international cooperation. Previous conferences have shown that countries around the world benefit from exchange and discussion on an international level regarding topics such as governance, best practices, evaluation of impacts and a wide variety of policy concerns related to research infrastructures. The overall objective of this proposal is to organize and further establish this dynamic international forum on research infrastructures. ICRI 2020 will bring together policy experts, facility managers, leading researchers and a wide variety of interested stakeholders to discuss challenges and emerging trends for research infrastructures around the world. The specific objectives of the proposed action are: 1. To provide an international forum for the discussion on the development of internationally important research infrastructures as well as on issues of common interest such as the internationalization of research infrastructures and assessing their impact on society and the economy; 2. To facilitate and promote international cooperation between European research infrastructures and their counterparts in all other regions of the world; and 3. To identify best practices and effective approaches to determine how research infrastructures can best enable research excellence.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 733274
    Overall Budget: 2,041,500 EURFunder Contribution: 1,961,000 EUR

    In order to strengthen the sustainability and resilience of health services and systems a unique consortium of governmental and funding organizations plus research institutes, has expressed the ambition to systematically learn from the organisation of care in other settings. Overall objective of TO-REACH is to provide groundwork for a future joint research programme that will contribute to the resilience, effectiveness, equity, accessibility and comprehensiveness of health services and systems. We will do so along two work streams: A) We will develop a research program on cross-border learning from good (or even innovative) models of care and the conditions needed to transfer them to other settings for implementation. It could refer to anywhere in the care chain depending on the priorities as identified in a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) within this project. Conceptual, methodological and empirical advancement will be achieved through 4 meta-questions that will instruct research under a future joint research programme, linking to what counts as good models of care, what are the conditions required for transferability, what are the conditions for up-scaling, and how do they contribute to the performance of health care organisations and systems. B) We will build a platform for funding organizations that allows for collaboration and coordination in the project and projected joint research programme. This will synchronize priorities and activities, hence improving the quality and applicability of research with a focus on the topic areas as described under A. TO-REACH will pursue five specific objectives: Mapping health system challenges and priorities by synthesizing different materials and stakeholder inputs; Developing a framework and providing a knowledge synthesis on the above-mentioned meta-questions; Establishing sustainable cooperation of research funding bodies and links with other initiatives; Developing a SRA through agenda setting at European and Member State level; Disseminating the results of TO-REACH.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 633190
    Overall Budget: 8,263,200 EURFunder Contribution: 5,998,990 EUR

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a major, chronic, non-communicable disease and the 2nd most frequent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Excess iron is primarily detected in the substantia nigra pars compacta, where dopaminergic neurons are exposed to high levels of oxidative stress produced by mitochondrial disorders and dopamine metabolism. Our previous preclinical, translational and pilot clinical studies demonstrated that novel iron chelation therapy with the prototypic drug deferiprone (DFP) (i) induces neuroprotection in cell models of PD via a powerful antioxidant effect, (ii) reduces regional siderosis of the brain, (iii) reduces motor handicap via inhibition of catechol-o-methyl transferase, and (iv) slows the progression of motor handicap in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model and in early PD patients. This project now seeks to demonstrate that conservative iron chelation therapy with moderate-dose DFP (30 mg/kg/day) slows the progression of handicap in de novo PD patients while not affecting systemic parameters. The 9-month, parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial will be followed by a 1-month wash-out period. The primary efficacy criterion will be the change in motor and non-motor handicap scores on the Total Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale to identify disease-modifying and symptomatic effects. The secondary efficacy criterion will be the change in score between baseline and 40 weeks (i.e. probing the disease-modifying effect only). Potential surrogate radiological and biological biomarkers, health economics and societal impacts will be assessed. 17 national, European and international research and innovation activities will be linked with the project. The study results should prompt academic and industrial research on iron chelation as a disease-modifying treatment in neurodegenerative diseases.

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  • Funder: WT Project Code: 215229
    Funder Contribution: 100,000 GBP

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface proteins. Agonist binding to GPCRs activates G proteins regulating many cellular effectors. Classically, G protein activation occurs at the plasma membrane and is rapidly terminated by β-arrestin recruitment to the activated GPCRs, promoting G protein uncoupling from receptor, GPCR internalisation and signalling arrest. However, recent studies revealed that upon internalisation, some GPCRs continue to activate G proteins from internal compartments leading to sustained production of second messengers far from the plasma membrane. This different spatiotemporal signalling profile allows distinct cellular functions from the ones occurring at the plasma membrane that can be exploited in the near future to design new pharmacological approaches. My collaborators and I recently observed that for some GPCRs such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor, formation of a GPCR-G protein-β-arrestin complex (baptised megaplex) in internal compartments is required for non-canonical Gs protein signalling. The initial research programme I propose aims to tackle the following important questions underlying this novel signalling mode: 1. Is G protein selectivity different at intracellular compartments vs at plasma membrane? 2. Is megaplex formation restricted to Gs isoform? 3. What is the specific role of β-arrestin within the megaplex? Environmental stimulants (hormones, neurotransmitters) can be compared to keys able to bind to and activate (open) cell surface receptors (locks). When a key opens a lock, proteins detecting this opened lock (called G proteins) are activated at the cell surface leading to specific outcomes. Some proteins (ß-arrestins) are then recruited to remove G proteins from the receptor and bring it inside the cell leading to signalling arrest. Recently, we observed that active G proteins can also be found inside the cell mediating different outcomes than when located at cell surface and that ß-arrestins was promoting receptor signalling inside the cell instead of stopping it. My objective is to explore this new G protein signalling, to learn how ß-arrestins can promote internalised receptor signalling, and determine if they activate other G proteins than the ones at the cell surface. This could lead to development of new medications with less side effects.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 633784
    Overall Budget: 6,120,860 EURFunder Contribution: 5,983,360 EUR

    Breast tumours are heterogeneous, and result from the complex interplay of multiple lifestyle/environmental and genetic risk factors. Through the EU-funded COGS project, we have identified a large number of germline variants that influence the risk of breast cancer. In combination, these variants can identify women at wide ranges of genetic risk, even in the absence of family history of breast cancer. Given that breast cancer is not one disease, it is now essential to better understand how risk factors act together to influence the development of pathologic-molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The aim of B-CAST is to identify women at moderate to high risk of breast cancer, the subtype of cancer that is most likely to develop and the prognosis of that particular subtype. This will be accomplished through large-scale pathologic-molecular analyses of over 20,000 breast tumours, and the integration of these data with unique resources from existing consortia, including germline, lifestyle/environmental, mammographic breast density, pathologic and clinical data. This information will inform the development of risk prediction and prognostication models that will be validated in longitudinal cohorts and clinical studies, and incorporated into online tools. We will also disseminate this knowledge to relevant stakeholders, and evaluate how to translate it into risk-stratified public health and clinical strategies. The current challenge for optimised prevention, early detection, and treatment decisions for breast cancer is understanding the genetic and lifestyle determinants of risk and prognosis of molecular subtypes. B-CAST will add to this understanding and will have immediate application with benefits to women by providing validated risk and prognostication tools. This will empower women and doctors with knowledge to tailor strategies for prevention and treatment. Ultimately, this work should result in reductions in the occurrence, morbidity and mortality of this disease.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 862032
    Funder Contribution: 150,000 EUR

    Sample preparation is considered to be the most difficult step in analytic workflow. Current methods for extraction and separation of minute substances in liquid samples are laborious, time-consuming, often involve large amounts of toxic organic solvents, and are often difficult to automatize, implying high costs of man-power. An innovative sample preparation technique which has the potential to overcome these shortcomings will be developed in this project. Based on the first promising results in the ERC-AdG project DDD, we propose a surface nanodroplet-based sensing approach for liquid-liquid extraction and online analysis of traces of analytes in aqueous solutions, including in biomedical, health, pharmaceutical and environmental contexts. The basis of our approach, referred to as nanoextraction, will be surface nanodroplets pre-formed on a substrate within a microflow channel. The principle of the nanoextraction is that the partition coefficient of the compound in the droplets is much higher than in the sample solution. The compound in the flow will thus be extracted to the nanodroplets that are immobilized on the channel walls. The concentration of the compound in the droplets will be quantified by surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques. Our proposed approach can potentially achieve extraction-separation-detection of analytes at extremely low concentrations in one single and simple step. The ability to achieve extraction-separation- detection of micropollutants in one single step is creating new and unique market opportunities which we want to explore. First, the technology can improve the state-of-the-art solutions in current markets, because of the easy usage and the small scale, thus saving time and costs. Second, we foresee new markets for the method, due to the higher sensitivity and point-of-care character of the solution. Our final goal in this project is to create a solid and investor-ready business plan, supported by a prototype.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 769929
    Overall Budget: 4,948,030 EURFunder Contribution: 4,948,030 EUR

    As of today, Europe remains not competitive in terms of Lithium battery cell development and especially manufacturing. This lack of competence and competitiveness could quickly spiral down into a complete loss of this key technology for electrification in the EU. Thus IMAGE will significantly contribute to sustainably develop the European Li-battery cell manufacturing competence and capability by creating a competitive, production-oriented research & development framework within Europe. A realistic and well-documented roadmap towards the manufacturing of cost-effective and competitive battery cells within Europe will emerge. This will be enforced by establishing a distributed battery cell production base that will be able, after careful upscaling of production, to supply the now burgeoning electric vehicle industry. From this context, the main goal of IMAGE is to push European’s Li-battery industry and academia to take over a leading role in the development and manufacturing of Next Generation Li-Ion cells. IMAGE has the following major objectives: 1) Develop generic production techniques for next generation battery cells based on high specific energy Li-metal battery cells. This will include a modular development approach that will be easy to up-scale while remaining flexible and safer to replace in case of any contingencies and market/ manufacturer configuration changes. 2) Identify energy and resource efficient cell manufacturing technologies and assets tailored to the existent European industrial infrastructure. This will include the identification of bottleneck factors and challenges that could be addressed in the present European industrial context. 3) Develop a progressive, multiple-tier technological and production framework that is able to cope with the inherent technological changes and advancements characteristic to this dynamic field. Thus, there will be several technologies covered by IMAGE, each having different technological maturity level.

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Advanced search in
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The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
20 Projects
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 634935
    Overall Budget: 6,460,000 EURFunder Contribution: 6,200,000 EUR

    Breast cancer affects more than 360,000 women per year in the EU and causes more than 90,000 deaths. Identification of women at high risk of the disease can lead to disease prevention through intensive screening, chemoprevention or prophylactic surgery. Breast cancer risk is determined by a combination of genetic and lifestyle risk factors. The advent of next generation sequencing has opened up the opportunity for testing in many disease genes, and diagnostic gene panel testing is being introduced in many EU countries. However, the cancer risks associated with most variants in most genes are unknown. This leads to a major problem in appropriate counselling and management of women undergoing panel testing. In this project, we aim to build a knowledge base that will allow identification of women at high-risk of breast cancer, in particular through comprehensive evaluation of DNA variants in known and suspected breast cancer genes. We will exploit the huge resources established through the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) and ENIGMA (Evidence-based Network for the Interpretation of Germline Mutant Alleles). We will expand the existing datasets by sequencing all known breast cancer susceptibility genes in 20,000 breast cancer cases and 20,000 controls from population-based studies, and 10,000 cases from multiple case families. Sequence data will be integrated with in-silico and functional data, with data on other known risk factors, to generate a comprehensive risk model that can provide personalised risk estimates. We will develop online tools to aid the interpretation of gene variants and provide risk estimates in a user-friendly format, to help genetic counsellors and patients worldwide to make informed clinical decisions. We will evaluate the acceptability and utility of comprehensive gene panel testing in the clinical genetics context.

    visibility3K
    visibilityviews3,066
    downloaddownloads7,244
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 643417
    Overall Budget: 30,953,000 EURFunder Contribution: 10,000,000 EUR

    Over 12 million people in Europe suffer from neurodegenerative diseases (ND), yet treatments that prevent or stop the progression of neurodegeneration are still lacking. Tackling this grand challenge requires enhanced coordination of national efforts to accelerate discovery. Such synergies have been created among 28 countries in the pilot EU JPI on Neurodegenerative Disease Research (JPND). JPND has a long standing experience in collaborative action with €75 million of additional national funds being successfully mobilized between 2011 and 2014 to support transnational research programs. The JPND Research Strategy is now ripe for further enhancement in tight coordination with the EC through an ERA-Net Cofund instrument JPco-fuND with an unprecedented commitment of €30 million of national funds associated to a highly incentivizing EC top-up fund. Among the most burning questions, three priority topics have emerged through a consultative process between researchers and JPND members in order to unlock several major issues within ND research: the identification of genetic, epigenetic and environmental risk and protective factors, the development and maintenance of longitudinal cohorts, the creation of advanced experimental models. These are key questions of equal priority to increase understanding of ND mechanisms that will be addressed through a common joint transnational call allowing a significant acceleration of the execution of the JPND research strategy. Moreover, to expand the impact of JPco-fuND, JPND will continue to implement other actions without EU co-funding such as aligning national research strategies, making databases more accessible and interoperable, developing enabling capacities such as supportive infrastructure and platforms, capacity building, education and training. These actions are required in parallel to achieve the highest impact for the patients, their carers and for society as whole and address this grand challenge in the coming years.

    visibility3K
    visibilityviews3,051
    downloaddownloads5,312
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 678732
    Overall Budget: 6,915,510 EURFunder Contribution: 6,915,510 EUR

    PROMISS (PRevention Of Malnutrition In Senior Subjects in the EU) is a multi-country project aiming to turn the challenge of tackling malnutrition in community-dwelling older persons into an opportunity for healthy ageing for the future. The PROMISS consortium contains worldwide expertise in epidemiology, clinical trials, geriatrics, nutrition, physical activity, microbiomics, as well as in behaviour, consumer, sensory and computer sciences. It builds on strong collaborations with food industry and SMEs to strengthen innovation of the European agri-food sector and their market position. Existing data from scientifically well-established prospective aging cohorts and national nutritional surveys from Europe and ‘third countries’ will be combined with new data from short- and long-term intervention studies in older persons at risk. Its holistic approach will provide insight in the causality of the links between diet, physical activity, appetite and malnutrition and underlying pathways, thereby providing the necessary evidence to develop optimal, sustainable and evidence-based dietary and physical activity strategies to prevent malnutrition and enhance active and healthy aging. PROMISS will also deliver food concepts and products as well as persuasive technology to support adherence to these strategies. The dietary and physical activity strategies and food products will be specifically developed with older user involvement to meet the needs and fit the preferences of older consumers. In close collaboration with stakeholders, PROMISS will translate these strategies into practical recommendations to guide policy and health professionals at EU- and Member States level. Dissemination and implementation takes place through strong dissemination partners operating on an European level and linked to national networks across Member States. PROMISS promises prevention of malnutrition, additional healthy life years and a strengthening of EU’s food industry

    visibility245
    visibilityviews245
    downloaddownloads432
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 874434
    Overall Budget: 369,300 EURFunder Contribution: 300,000 EUR

    Research infrastructures are key enablers in all areas of research and technology development and, as such, are crucial to advancing the frontiers of knowledge. RIs are increasingly used by researchers from numerous countries and are often operated by international consortia. The necessary expenditures for research infrastructures take up a significant portion of overall research budgets and they are constantly under pressure to adapt due to the advancements in science, research and technology. All these aspects underline the importance of research infrastructures. They also demonstrate the complexity that occur with construction, implementation, governance, operation, funding and international cooperation. Previous conferences have shown that countries around the world benefit from exchange and discussion on an international level regarding topics such as governance, best practices, evaluation of impacts and a wide variety of policy concerns related to research infrastructures. The overall objective of this proposal is to organize and further establish this dynamic international forum on research infrastructures. ICRI 2020 will bring together policy experts, facility managers, leading researchers and a wide variety of interested stakeholders to discuss challenges and emerging trends for research infrastructures around the world. The specific objectives of the proposed action are: 1. To provide an international forum for the discussion on the development of internationally important research infrastructures as well as on issues of common interest such as the internationalization of research infrastructures and assessing their impact on society and the economy; 2. To facilitate and promote international cooperation between European research infrastructures and their counterparts in all other regions of the world; and 3. To identify best practices and effective approaches to determine how research infrastructures can best enable research excellence.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 733274
    Overall Budget: 2,041,500 EURFunder Contribution: 1,961,000 EUR

    In order to strengthen the sustainability and resilience of health services and systems a unique consortium of governmental and funding organizations plus research institutes, has expressed the ambition to systematically learn from the organisation of care in other settings. Overall objective of TO-REACH is to provide groundwork for a future joint research programme that will contribute to the resilience, effectiveness, equity, accessibility and comprehensiveness of health services and systems. We will do so along two work streams: A) We will develop a research program on cross-border learning from good (or even innovative) models of care and the conditions needed to transfer them to other settings for implementation. It could refer to anywhere in the care chain depending on the priorities as identified in a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) within this project. Conceptual, methodological and empirical advancement will be achieved through 4 meta-questions that will instruct research under a future joint research programme, linking to what counts as good models of care, what are the conditions required for transferability, what are the conditions for up-scaling, and how do they contribute to the performance of health care organisations and systems. B) We will build a platform for funding organizations that allows for collaboration and coordination in the project and projected joint research programme. This will synchronize priorities and activities, hence improving the quality and applicability of research with a focus on the topic areas as described under A. TO-REACH will pursue five specific objectives: Mapping health system challenges and priorities by synthesizing different materials and stakeholder inputs; Developing a framework and providing a knowledge synthesis on the above-mentioned meta-questions; Establishing sustainable cooperation of research funding bodies and links with other initiatives; Developing a SRA through agenda setting at European and Member State level; Disseminating the results of TO-REACH.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 633190
    Overall Budget: 8,263,200 EURFunder Contribution: 5,998,990 EUR

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a major, chronic, non-communicable disease and the 2nd most frequent neurodegenerative disorder worldwide. Excess iron is primarily detected in the substantia nigra pars compacta, where dopaminergic neurons are exposed to high levels of oxidative stress produced by mitochondrial disorders and dopamine metabolism. Our previous preclinical, translational and pilot clinical studies demonstrated that novel iron chelation therapy with the prototypic drug deferiprone (DFP) (i) induces neuroprotection in cell models of PD via a powerful antioxidant effect, (ii) reduces regional siderosis of the brain, (iii) reduces motor handicap via inhibition of catechol-o-methyl transferase, and (iv) slows the progression of motor handicap in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model and in early PD patients. This project now seeks to demonstrate that conservative iron chelation therapy with moderate-dose DFP (30 mg/kg/day) slows the progression of handicap in de novo PD patients while not affecting systemic parameters. The 9-month, parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled, multicentre trial will be followed by a 1-month wash-out period. The primary efficacy criterion will be the change in motor and non-motor handicap scores on the Total Movement Disorders Society Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale to identify disease-modifying and symptomatic effects. The secondary efficacy criterion will be the change in score between baseline and 40 weeks (i.e. probing the disease-modifying effect only). Potential surrogate radiological and biological biomarkers, health economics and societal impacts will be assessed. 17 national, European and international research and innovation activities will be linked with the project. The study results should prompt academic and industrial research on iron chelation as a disease-modifying treatment in neurodegenerative diseases.

    visibility555
    visibilityviews555
    downloaddownloads988
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 215229
    Funder Contribution: 100,000 GBP

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) represent the largest family of cell surface proteins. Agonist binding to GPCRs activates G proteins regulating many cellular effectors. Classically, G protein activation occurs at the plasma membrane and is rapidly terminated by β-arrestin recruitment to the activated GPCRs, promoting G protein uncoupling from receptor, GPCR internalisation and signalling arrest. However, recent studies revealed that upon internalisation, some GPCRs continue to activate G proteins from internal compartments leading to sustained production of second messengers far from the plasma membrane. This different spatiotemporal signalling profile allows distinct cellular functions from the ones occurring at the plasma membrane that can be exploited in the near future to design new pharmacological approaches. My collaborators and I recently observed that for some GPCRs such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor, formation of a GPCR-G protein-β-arrestin complex (baptised megaplex) in internal compartments is required for non-canonical Gs protein signalling. The initial research programme I propose aims to tackle the following important questions underlying this novel signalling mode: 1. Is G protein selectivity different at intracellular compartments vs at plasma membrane? 2. Is megaplex formation restricted to Gs isoform? 3. What is the specific role of β-arrestin within the megaplex? Environmental stimulants (hormones, neurotransmitters) can be compared to keys able to bind to and activate (open) cell surface receptors (locks). When a key opens a lock, proteins detecting this opened lock (called G proteins) are activated at the cell surface leading to specific outcomes. Some proteins (ß-arrestins) are then recruited to remove G proteins from the receptor and bring it inside the cell leading to signalling arrest. Recently, we observed that active G proteins can also be found inside the cell mediating different outcomes than when located at cell surface and that ß-arrestins was promoting receptor signalling inside the cell instead of stopping it. My objective is to explore this new G protein signalling, to learn how ß-arrestins can promote internalised receptor signalling, and determine if they activate other G proteins than the ones at the cell surface. This could lead to development of new medications with less side effects.

    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 633784
    Overall Budget: 6,120,860 EURFunder Contribution: 5,983,360 EUR

    Breast tumours are heterogeneous, and result from the complex interplay of multiple lifestyle/environmental and genetic risk factors. Through the EU-funded COGS project, we have identified a large number of germline variants that influence the risk of breast cancer. In combination, these variants can identify women at wide ranges of genetic risk, even in the absence of family history of breast cancer. Given that breast cancer is not one disease, it is now essential to better understand how risk factors act together to influence the development of pathologic-molecular subtypes of breast cancer. The aim of B-CAST is to identify women at moderate to high risk of breast cancer, the subtype of cancer that is most likely to develop and the prognosis of that particular subtype. This will be accomplished through large-scale pathologic-molecular analyses of over 20,000 breast tumours, and the integration of these data with unique resources from existing consortia, including germline, lifestyle/environmental, mammographic breast density, pathologic and clinical data. This information will inform the development of risk prediction and prognostication models that will be validated in longitudinal cohorts and clinical studies, and incorporated into online tools. We will also disseminate this knowledge to relevant stakeholders, and evaluate how to translate it into risk-stratified public health and clinical strategies. The current challenge for optimised prevention, early detection, and treatment decisions for breast cancer is understanding the genetic and lifestyle determinants of risk and prognosis of molecular subtypes. B-CAST will add to this understanding and will have immediate application with benefits to women by providing validated risk and prognostication tools. This will empower women and doctors with knowledge to tailor strategies for prevention and treatment. Ultimately, this work should result in reductions in the occurrence, morbidity and mortality of this disease.

    visibility2K
    visibilityviews2,367
    downloaddownloads5,947
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 862032
    Funder Contribution: 150,000 EUR

    Sample preparation is considered to be the most difficult step in analytic workflow. Current methods for extraction and separation of minute substances in liquid samples are laborious, time-consuming, often involve large amounts of toxic organic solvents, and are often difficult to automatize, implying high costs of man-power. An innovative sample preparation technique which has the potential to overcome these shortcomings will be developed in this project. Based on the first promising results in the ERC-AdG project DDD, we propose a surface nanodroplet-based sensing approach for liquid-liquid extraction and online analysis of traces of analytes in aqueous solutions, including in biomedical, health, pharmaceutical and environmental contexts. The basis of our approach, referred to as nanoextraction, will be surface nanodroplets pre-formed on a substrate within a microflow channel. The principle of the nanoextraction is that the partition coefficient of the compound in the droplets is much higher than in the sample solution. The compound in the flow will thus be extracted to the nanodroplets that are immobilized on the channel walls. The concentration of the compound in the droplets will be quantified by surface-sensitive spectroscopic techniques. Our proposed approach can potentially achieve extraction-separation-detection of analytes at extremely low concentrations in one single and simple step. The ability to achieve extraction-separation- detection of micropollutants in one single step is creating new and unique market opportunities which we want to explore. First, the technology can improve the state-of-the-art solutions in current markets, because of the easy usage and the small scale, thus saving time and costs. Second, we foresee new markets for the method, due to the higher sensitivity and point-of-care character of the solution. Our final goal in this project is to create a solid and investor-ready business plan, supported by a prototype.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 769929
    Overall Budget: 4,948,030 EURFunder Contribution: 4,948,030 EUR

    As of today, Europe remains not competitive in terms of Lithium battery cell development and especially manufacturing. This lack of competence and competitiveness could quickly spiral down into a complete loss of this key technology for electrification in the EU. Thus IMAGE will significantly contribute to sustainably develop the European Li-battery cell manufacturing competence and capability by creating a competitive, production-oriented research & development framework within Europe. A realistic and well-documented roadmap towards the manufacturing of cost-effective and competitive battery cells within Europe will emerge. This will be enforced by establishing a distributed battery cell production base that will be able, after careful upscaling of production, to supply the now burgeoning electric vehicle industry. From this context, the main goal of IMAGE is to push European’s Li-battery industry and academia to take over a leading role in the development and manufacturing of Next Generation Li-Ion cells. IMAGE has the following major objectives: 1) Develop generic production techniques for next generation battery cells based on high specific energy Li-metal battery cells. This will include a modular development approach that will be easy to up-scale while remaining flexible and safer to replace in case of any contingencies and market/ manufacturer configuration changes. 2) Identify energy and resource efficient cell manufacturing technologies and assets tailored to the existent European industrial infrastructure. This will include the identification of bottleneck factors and challenges that could be addressed in the present European industrial context. 3) Develop a progressive, multiple-tier technological and production framework that is able to cope with the inherent technological changes and advancements characteristic to this dynamic field. Thus, there will be several technologies covered by IMAGE, each having different technological maturity level.

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