Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Project
arrow_drop_down
is
arrow_drop_down
[MICROBONE] Multiscale poro-micromechanics of bone materials, with links to biology and medicine (257023)
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1 Research products, page 1 of 1

  • Canada
  • Publications

Date (most recent)
arrow_drop_down
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Stefan Scheiner; Peter Pivonka; Christian Hellmich;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Project: CIHR , EC | MICROBONE (257023)

    Mechanical loads which are macroscopically acting onto bony organs, are known to influence the activities of biological cells located in the pore spaces of bone, in particular so the signaling and production processes mediated by osteocytes. The exact mechanisms by which osteocytes are actually able to “feel” the mechanical loading and changes thereof, has been the subject of numerous studies, and, while several hypotheses have been brought forth over time, this topic has remained a matter of debate. Relaxation times reported in a recent experimental study of Gardinier et al. (Bone 46(4):1075–1081, 2010) strongly suggest that the lacunar pores are likely to experience, during typical physiological load cycles, not only fluid transport, but also undrained conditions. The latter entail the buildup of lacunar pore pressures, which we here quantify by means of a thorough multiscale modeling approach. In particular, the proposed model is based on classical poroelasticity theory, and able to account for multiple pore spaces. First, the model reveals distinct nonlinear dependencies of the resulting lacunar (and vascular) pore pressures on the underlying bone composition, highlighting the importance of a rigorous multiscale approach for appropriate computation of the aforementioned pore pressures. Then, the derived equations are evaluated for macroscopic (uniaxial as well as hydrostatic) mechanical loading of physiological magnitude. The resulting model-predicted pore pressures agree very well with the pressures that have been revealed, by means of in vitro studies, to be of adequate magnitude for modulating the responses of biological cells, including osteocytes. This underlines that osteocytes may respond to many types of loading stimuli at the same time, in particular so to fluid flow and hydrostatic pressure.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Project
arrow_drop_down
is
arrow_drop_down
[MICROBONE] Multiscale poro-micromechanics of bone materials, with links to biology and medicine (257023)
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Stefan Scheiner; Peter Pivonka; Christian Hellmich;
    Publisher: Springer Science and Business Media LLC
    Project: CIHR , EC | MICROBONE (257023)

    Mechanical loads which are macroscopically acting onto bony organs, are known to influence the activities of biological cells located in the pore spaces of bone, in particular so the signaling and production processes mediated by osteocytes. The exact mechanisms by which osteocytes are actually able to “feel” the mechanical loading and changes thereof, has been the subject of numerous studies, and, while several hypotheses have been brought forth over time, this topic has remained a matter of debate. Relaxation times reported in a recent experimental study of Gardinier et al. (Bone 46(4):1075–1081, 2010) strongly suggest that the lacunar pores are likely to experience, during typical physiological load cycles, not only fluid transport, but also undrained conditions. The latter entail the buildup of lacunar pore pressures, which we here quantify by means of a thorough multiscale modeling approach. In particular, the proposed model is based on classical poroelasticity theory, and able to account for multiple pore spaces. First, the model reveals distinct nonlinear dependencies of the resulting lacunar (and vascular) pore pressures on the underlying bone composition, highlighting the importance of a rigorous multiscale approach for appropriate computation of the aforementioned pore pressures. Then, the derived equations are evaluated for macroscopic (uniaxial as well as hydrostatic) mechanical loading of physiological magnitude. The resulting model-predicted pore pressures agree very well with the pressures that have been revealed, by means of in vitro studies, to be of adequate magnitude for modulating the responses of biological cells, including osteocytes. This underlines that osteocytes may respond to many types of loading stimuli at the same time, in particular so to fluid flow and hydrostatic pressure.