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[PLURISYS] Systems biology approaches to understand cell pluripotency Acronym: PluriSys (223485)
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3 Research products, page 1 of 1

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hendrik Marks; Hindrik H. D. Kerstens; Tahsin Stefan Barakat; Erik Splinter; René A.M. Dirks; Guido van Mierlo; Onkar Joshi; Shuang-Yin Wang; Tomas Babak; Cornelis A. Albers; +6 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Netherlands, France
    Project: NWO | Mechanisms behind mainten... (10371), EC | SYSSTEMCELL (339431), WT , EC | PLURISYS (223485)

    Background During early embryonic development, one of the two X chromosomes in mammalian female cells is inactivated to compensate for a potential imbalance in transcript levels with male cells, which contain a single X chromosome. Here, we use mouse female embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with non-random X chromosome inactivation (XCI) and polymorphic X chromosomes to study the dynamics of gene silencing over the inactive X chromosome by high-resolution allele-specific RNA-seq. Results Induction of XCI by differentiation of female ESCs shows that genes proximal to the X-inactivation center are silenced earlier than distal genes, while lowly expressed genes show faster XCI dynamics than highly expressed genes. The active X chromosome shows a minor but significant increase in gene activity during differentiation, resulting in complete dosage compensation in differentiated cell types. Genes escaping XCI show little or no silencing during early propagation of XCI. Allele-specific RNA-seq of neural progenitor cells generated from the female ESCs identifies three regions distal to the X-inactivation center that escape XCI. These regions, which stably escape during propagation and maintenance of XCI, coincide with topologically associating domains (TADs) as present in the female ESCs. Also, the previously characterized gene clusters escaping XCI in human fibroblasts correlate with TADs. Conclusions The gene silencing observed during XCI provides further insight in the establishment of the repressive complex formed by the inactive X chromosome. The association of escape regions with TADs, in mouse and human, suggests that TADs are the primary targets during propagation of XCI over the X chromosome. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13059-015-0698-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vanessa Jane Hall; Katrin Hinrichs; G. Lazzari; Dean H. Betts; Poul Hyttel;
    Countries: Denmark, Canada
    Project: EC | PARTNERS (218205), EC | PLURISYS (223485)

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved production and health in animal husbandry. More recently, biomedical applications of these technologies, in particular, SCNT and stem cell culture, have been pursued in domestic mammals in order to create models for human disease and therapy. The following review focuses on presenting important aspects of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mikkel A. Rasmussen; Vanessa Jane Hall; T.F. Carter; Poul Hyttel;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | PLURISYS (223485), EC | PARTNERS (218205)

    AbstractNeural progenitor cells (NPCs) are promising candidates for cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases; however, safety concerns must be addressed through transplantation studies in large animal models, such as the pig. The aim of this study was to derive NPCs from porcine blastocysts and evaluate their in-vitro differentiation potential. Epiblasts were manually isolated from expanded hatched blastocysts and cultured on MEF feeder cells. Outgrowth colonies were passaged to MS5 cells and rosettes were further passaged to Matrigel-coated dishes containing bFGF and EGF. Three NPC lines were established which showed expression of SOX2, NESTIN and VIMENTIN. One line was characterised in more detail, retaining a normal karyotype and proliferating for more than three months in culture. Following differentiation, TUJI was significantly up-regulated in protocol 2 (RA and SHH; 58% positive cells) as were NF and TH. In contrast, MBP was significantly up-regulated in protocol 3 (FGF8 and SHH; 63% positive cells), whereas, GFAP was significantly up-regulated in protocols 1–4 (33%, 25%, 43% and 22%). The present study provides the first report of a porcine blastocyst-derived NPC line capable of differentiating into both neurons and glia, which may be of paramount importance for future transplantation studies in large animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Project
arrow_drop_down
is
arrow_drop_down
[PLURISYS] Systems biology approaches to understand cell pluripotency Acronym: PluriSys (223485)
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
3 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hendrik Marks; Hindrik H. D. Kerstens; Tahsin Stefan Barakat; Erik Splinter; René A.M. Dirks; Guido van Mierlo; Onkar Joshi; Shuang-Yin Wang; Tomas Babak; Cornelis A. Albers; +6 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Netherlands, France
    Project: NWO | Mechanisms behind mainten... (10371), EC | SYSSTEMCELL (339431), WT , EC | PLURISYS (223485)

    Background During early embryonic development, one of the two X chromosomes in mammalian female cells is inactivated to compensate for a potential imbalance in transcript levels with male cells, which contain a single X chromosome. Here, we use mouse female embryonic stem cells (ESCs) with non-random X chromosome inactivation (XCI) and polymorphic X chromosomes to study the dynamics of gene silencing over the inactive X chromosome by high-resolution allele-specific RNA-seq. Results Induction of XCI by differentiation of female ESCs shows that genes proximal to the X-inactivation center are silenced earlier than distal genes, while lowly expressed genes show faster XCI dynamics than highly expressed genes. The active X chromosome shows a minor but significant increase in gene activity during differentiation, resulting in complete dosage compensation in differentiated cell types. Genes escaping XCI show little or no silencing during early propagation of XCI. Allele-specific RNA-seq of neural progenitor cells generated from the female ESCs identifies three regions distal to the X-inactivation center that escape XCI. These regions, which stably escape during propagation and maintenance of XCI, coincide with topologically associating domains (TADs) as present in the female ESCs. Also, the previously characterized gene clusters escaping XCI in human fibroblasts correlate with TADs. Conclusions The gene silencing observed during XCI provides further insight in the establishment of the repressive complex formed by the inactive X chromosome. The association of escape regions with TADs, in mouse and human, suggests that TADs are the primary targets during propagation of XCI over the X chromosome. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s13059-015-0698-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vanessa Jane Hall; Katrin Hinrichs; G. Lazzari; Dean H. Betts; Poul Hyttel;
    Countries: Denmark, Canada
    Project: EC | PARTNERS (218205), EC | PLURISYS (223485)

    Over many decades assisted reproductive technologies, including artificial insemination, embryo transfer, in vitro production (IVP) of embryos, cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and stem cell culture, have been developed with the aim of refining breeding strategies for improved production and health in animal husbandry. More recently, biomedical applications of these technologies, in particular, SCNT and stem cell culture, have been pursued in domestic mammals in order to create models for human disease and therapy. The following review focuses on presenting important aspects of pre-implantation development in cattle, pigs, horses, and dogs. Biological aspects and impact of assisted reproductive technologies including IVP, SCNT, and culture of pluripotent stem cells are also addressed. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mikkel A. Rasmussen; Vanessa Jane Hall; T.F. Carter; Poul Hyttel;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Project: EC | PLURISYS (223485), EC | PARTNERS (218205)

    AbstractNeural progenitor cells (NPCs) are promising candidates for cell-based therapy of neurodegenerative diseases; however, safety concerns must be addressed through transplantation studies in large animal models, such as the pig. The aim of this study was to derive NPCs from porcine blastocysts and evaluate their in-vitro differentiation potential. Epiblasts were manually isolated from expanded hatched blastocysts and cultured on MEF feeder cells. Outgrowth colonies were passaged to MS5 cells and rosettes were further passaged to Matrigel-coated dishes containing bFGF and EGF. Three NPC lines were established which showed expression of SOX2, NESTIN and VIMENTIN. One line was characterised in more detail, retaining a normal karyotype and proliferating for more than three months in culture. Following differentiation, TUJI was significantly up-regulated in protocol 2 (RA and SHH; 58% positive cells) as were NF and TH. In contrast, MBP was significantly up-regulated in protocol 3 (FGF8 and SHH; 63% positive cells), whereas, GFAP was significantly up-regulated in protocols 1–4 (33%, 25%, 43% and 22%). The present study provides the first report of a porcine blastocyst-derived NPC line capable of differentiating into both neurons and glia, which may be of paramount importance for future transplantation studies in large animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.