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New field-scale calibration for turbidity current impact modelling (NE/P009190/1)
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sophie Hage; Matthieu J.B. Cartigny; Esther J. Sumner; Michael A. Clare; John E. Hughes Clarke; Peter J. Talling; D. Gwyn Lintern; Stephen M. Simmons; Ricardo Silva Jacinto; Age Vellinga; +12 more
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    Countries: United Kingdom, United Kingdom, Netherlands, France, United Kingdom
    Project: UKRI | Marine LTSS: Climate Link... (NE/R015953/1), EC | GEOSTICK (725955), UKRI | CO-ORDINATING AND PUMP-PR... (NE/M017540/1), UKRI | NERC KE ERIIP Fellowship ... (NE/P005780/1), UKRI | New field-scale calibrati... (NE/P009190/1), UKRI | Developing the UK nationa... (NE/M007138/1)

    Abstract Rivers (on land) and turbidity currents (in the ocean) are the most important sediment transport processes on Earth. Yet how rivers generate turbidity currents as they enter the coastal ocean remains poorly understood. The current paradigm, based on laboratory experiments, is that turbidity currents are triggered when river plumes exceed a threshold sediment concentration of ~1 kg/m3. Here we present direct observations of an exceptionally dilute river plume, with sediment concentrations 1 order of magnitude below this threshold (0.07 kg/m3), which generated a fast (1.5 m/s), erosive, short‐lived (6 min) turbidity current. However, no turbidity current occurred during subsequent river plumes. We infer that turbidity currents are generated when fine sediment, accumulating in a tidal turbidity maximum, is released during spring tide. This means that very dilute river plumes can generate turbidity currents more frequently and in a wider range of locations than previously thought. Key Points Here we document for the first time how very dilute (up to 0.07 kg/m3) river plumes can generate powerful turbidity currentsSuch low sediment concentrations are 20 times lower than those predicted by past theory and experimentsTherefore, turbidity currents are likely to be much more frequent and occur at a far wider range of locations than previously thought

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New field-scale calibration for turbidity current impact modelling (NE/P009190/1)
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sophie Hage; Matthieu J.B. Cartigny; Esther J. Sumner; Michael A. Clare; John E. Hughes Clarke; Peter J. Talling; D. Gwyn Lintern; Stephen M. Simmons; Ricardo Silva Jacinto; Age Vellinga; +12 more
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)
    Countries: United Kingdom, United Kingdom, Netherlands, France, United Kingdom
    Project: UKRI | Marine LTSS: Climate Link... (NE/R015953/1), EC | GEOSTICK (725955), UKRI | CO-ORDINATING AND PUMP-PR... (NE/M017540/1), UKRI | NERC KE ERIIP Fellowship ... (NE/P005780/1), UKRI | New field-scale calibrati... (NE/P009190/1), UKRI | Developing the UK nationa... (NE/M007138/1)

    Abstract Rivers (on land) and turbidity currents (in the ocean) are the most important sediment transport processes on Earth. Yet how rivers generate turbidity currents as they enter the coastal ocean remains poorly understood. The current paradigm, based on laboratory experiments, is that turbidity currents are triggered when river plumes exceed a threshold sediment concentration of ~1 kg/m3. Here we present direct observations of an exceptionally dilute river plume, with sediment concentrations 1 order of magnitude below this threshold (0.07 kg/m3), which generated a fast (1.5 m/s), erosive, short‐lived (6 min) turbidity current. However, no turbidity current occurred during subsequent river plumes. We infer that turbidity currents are generated when fine sediment, accumulating in a tidal turbidity maximum, is released during spring tide. This means that very dilute river plumes can generate turbidity currents more frequently and in a wider range of locations than previously thought. Key Points Here we document for the first time how very dilute (up to 0.07 kg/m3) river plumes can generate powerful turbidity currentsSuch low sediment concentrations are 20 times lower than those predicted by past theory and experimentsTherefore, turbidity currents are likely to be much more frequent and occur at a far wider range of locations than previously thought