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    Authors: 
    Kuo-Ting Chen; Jim Nieuwenhuizen; Maryana Handula; Yann Seimbille;
    Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
    Country: Netherlands

    We herein describe the development of a novel dual-modality optical/radio-imaging agent for general and site-specific labeling of biovectors through a 2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT)/1,2-aminothiol click reaction. The CBT-based multifunctional single-attachment-point (MSAP) agent enables a single-step synthesis of various dual-modality probes characterized by rapid conjugation, high labeling yields, metabolically stable products and applicability to orthogonal two-step labeling of sensitive biomolecules. In addition, the two-step radiolabeling protocol and click reaction were optimized by using CBT scavengers to improve the reaction rate and molar activity of the imaging probes. Our methodology allows for a simple and efficient synthetic route to produce a variety of dual-modality imaging agents for preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative surgical guidance.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Jean Sánchez-Sánchez; Janis Alarcón-Loayza; Luz Villa-Castillo; Mikashmi Kohli; Catharina Boehme; Sergio Carmona; Patricia J. Garcia; Madhukar Pai; Cesar Ugarte-Gil;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Peru

    Even though the WHO Essential Medicines List has been published and updated for the last 40 years, diagnostics only got their due recognition in the last two years. WHO published the first Essential Diagnostics List (EDL) in 2018 and subsequently updated in 2019...

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Mathieu Lempereur; Adel Aminian; Jacqueline Saw;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Belgium
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Gower-Rousseau, C.; Sarter, H.; Savoye, G.; Tavernier, N.; Fumery, M.; Sandborn, W. J.; Feagan, B. G.; Duhamel, A.; Guillon-Dellac, N.; Colombel, J.-F.; +31 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Belgium, France

    Background: IBDs are chronic destructive disorders that negatively affect the functional status of patients. Recently, the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Disability Index (IBD-DI) was developed according to standard WHO processes. The aims of the current study were to validate the IBD-DI in an independent patient cohort, to develop an index-specific scoring system and to describe the disability status of a well-defined population-based cohort of French patients with IBD. Methods: From February 2012 to March 2014, the IBD-DI questionnaire was administered to a random sample of adult patients with an established diagnosis of IBD issued from a French population-based registry. The IBD-DI consists of 28 items that evaluate the four domains of body functions, activity participation, body structures and environmental factors. Validation included item reduction and data structure, construct validity, internal consistency, interobserver and intraobserver reliability evaluations. Results: 150 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 50 patients with UC completed the IBD-DI validation phase. The intraclass correlation coefficient for interobserver reliability was 0.91 and 0.54 for intraobserver reliability. Cronbach's α of internal consistency was 0.86. IBD-DI scores varied from 0 to 100 with a mean of 35.3 (Q1=19.6; Q3=51.8). IBD-DI scores were highly correlated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (-0.82; p<0.001) and SF-36 (-0.61; p<0.05) scores. Female gender (p<0.001), clinical disease activity (p<0.0001) and disease duration (p=0.02) were associated with higher IBD-DI scores. Conclusions: The IBD-DI has been validated for use in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. The IBD-DI showed high internal consistency, interobserver reliability and construct validity, and a moderate intraobserver reliability. It comprises 14 questions and ranges from 0 to 100. The mean IBD-DI score was 35.3 and was associated with gender, clinical disease activity and disease duration. Further research is needed to confirm the structural validity and to assess the responsiveness of IBD-DI. Trial registration number: 2011-A00877-34. © 2017, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique Inter Regional» 2011

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Stephanie Child; Steven Stewart; Spencer Moore;
    Country: Netherlands

    Abstract Background Cross-sectional research suggests social capital has negative consequences for problem drinking behaviors. Previous studies have suggested psychosocial resources, including perceived control, may buffer this association. Little research has examined whether such relationships persist longitudinally. Methods Random effects models examined between-person relationships among problem drinking, social capital, and perceived control, and whether perceived control moderated the relationship between social capital and drinking. Fixed effects models assessed whether social capital and perceived control were related to changes in problem drinking. Results Greater network capital and generalized trust predicted higher odds of binge drinking (RR = 1.08; 95% CI = 1.03-1.12 and RR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.03-1.48, respectively). Perceived control moderated the positive association of network capital with binge drinking (RR = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.87-0.96). Conclusions The present findings support previous notions about the complex role of social capital on health, and offer new insights on the role of perceived control on problem drinking.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Alice Bonnefoy-Mazure; Thibault Favre; Guillaume Praplan; Stéphane Armand; Yoshimasa Sagawa Junior; Didier Hannouche; Katia Turcot; Anne Lübbeke; Hermès Howard Miozzari;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Switzerland

    Abstract Background The purpose of this prospective study was to understand the relation between gait outcomes and patient satisfaction one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods Seventy-nine patients were evaluated before and one year after TKA using clinical gait analysis. Specific gait outcomes were analyzed: gait speed, stance phase, range of motion (ROM) knee flexion and maximal knee flexion. The parameters of interest selected for the statistical analysis were: gait speed and maximal knee flexion during gait. The Western Ontario and MacMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and patient satisfaction were also assessed. The satisfaction was evaluated using a questionnaire and was splited in five categories: very unsatisfied, unsatisfied, neutral, satisfied or very satisfied. To assess associations between patient satisfaction and maximal knee flexion during gait and gait speed, an unadjusted ordinal logistic regression analysis was used. The analysis was then adjusted for covariates: age and Body Mass Index (BMI) before surgery and WOMAC pain one year after surgery. Results All gait outcomes after TKA had significantly improved. The ordinal logistic regression analysis found significant associations between patient satisfaction and maximal knee flexion after TKA (unadjusted and adjusted) but not for gait speed. Conclusion These findings show that all patients improved their gait outcomes one year after TKA but only a higher maximal knee flexion during gait may influence the level of patient satisfaction.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    F. Stelma; M.H. van der Ree; Leo Jansen; Marion G. Peters; Harry L.A. Janssen; Hans L. Zaaijer; R. Bart Takkenberg; Henk W. Reesink;
    Country: Netherlands

    Combining peginterferon-alfa-2a (pegIFN) with a nucleotide analogue can result in higher rates of HBsAg loss than either therapy given alone. Here, we investigated the durability of the response to combination therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients after 5 years of follow-up. In the initial study, 92 CHB patients (44 HBeAg-positive, 48 HBeAg-negative) with HBV DNA >100 000 c/mL (~20 000 IU/mL) and active hepatitis were treated for 48 weeks with pegIFN 180 μg/week and 10 mg adefovir dipivoxil daily. For the long-term follow-up (LTFU) study, patients were followed up for 5 years after the end of treatment. At year 5, 70 (32 HBeAg-positive, 38 HBeAg-negative) patients remained in the study. At year 5, 19% (6/32) of HBeAg-positive patients and 16% (6/38) of HBeAg-negative patients lost HBsAg, and no HBsAg seroreversion was observed. The 5-year cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for HBsAg loss was 17.2% for HBeAg-positive patients and 19.3% for HBeAg-negative patients. Fourteen of sixteen patients who lost HBsAg at any time point during follow-up developed anti-HBs antibodies (>10 IU/L). At year 5, in total 63% (20/32) of HBeAg-positive and 71% (27/38) of HBeAg-negative patients were retreated with nucleos(t)ide analogues during follow-up. The cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for retreatment was 60% of patients at year 5. At year 5 of follow-up, 18% of CHB patients treated with pegIFN/nucleotide analogue combination therapy had durable HBsAg loss and 88% of these had developed anti-HBs antibodies.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2019
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Jessica Chan; Jeppe Friborg; Mikhail Chernov; Mikhail Cherkashin; Cai Grau; Michael Brundage; Ben J. Slotman;
    Country: Netherlands

    Summary Cancer is a substantial health burden for Inuit populations, an Indigenous peoples who primarily inhabit the circumpolar regions of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Russia. Access to radiotherapy is lacking or absent in many of these regions, despite it being an essential component of cancer treatment. This Review presents an overview of factors influencing radiotherapy delivery in each of the four circumpolar Inuit regions, which include population and geography, health-systems infrastructure, and cancer epidemiology. This Review also provides insight into the complex patient pathways needed to access radiotherapy, and on radiotherapy use. The unique challenges in delivering radiotherapy to circumpolar Inuit populations are discussed, which, notably, include geographical and cultural barriers. Recommendations include models of care that have successfully addressed these barriers, and highlight the need for increased collaboration between circumpolar referral centres in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Russia to ultimately allow for better delivery of cancer treatment.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Maxime Lussier; Stéphane Adam; Belkacem Chikhaoui; Charles Consel; Mathieu Gagnon; Brigitte Gilbert; Sylvain Giroux; Manon Guay; Carol Hudon; Hélène Imbeault; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Belgium, France, France

    Background Functional assessment is of paramount importance when mild cognitive impairment is suspected, but common assessment tools such as questionnaires lack sensitivity. An alternative and innovative approach consists in using sensor technology in smart apartments during scenario-based assessments of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). However, studies that investigate this approach are scarce and the technology used is not always transposable in healthcare settings. Objective To explore whether simple and wireless technology used in two different smart environments could add value to performance and rater-based measures of IADL when it comes to predicting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older adults. Methods Twenty-six (26) cognitively healthy older adults (CH) and 22 older adults with MCI were recruited. Functional performance in a set of five scripted tasks was evaluated with sensor-based observations (motion, contact, and electric sensors) and performance-based measures (rated with videotapes). The five tasks could be performed in any order and were detailed on an instruction sheet given to participants. Results Sensor-based observations showed that participants with MCI spent more time in the kitchen and looking into the fridge and kitchen cabinets than CH participants. Moreover, these measures were negatively associated with memory and executive performances of participants and significantly contributed to the prediction of MCI. Conclusion Simple, wireless, and sensor-based technology holds potential for the detection of MCI in older adults as they perform daily tasks. However, some limits are discussed and we offer recommendations to improve the usefulness of this innovative approach.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 2019
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Johnston, Bradley C.; Patrick, Donald L.; Devji, Tahira; Maxwell, Lara J.; Bingham, Clifton O.; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Boers, Maarten; Briel, Matthias; Busse, Jason W.; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; +19 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Netherlands

    Authors of systematic reviews that include patient-reported outcomes (PROs) should have a good understanding of how patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are developed, including the constructs they are intended to measure, their reliability, validity and responsiveness. This chapter describes the category of outcomes known as PROs and their importance for healthcare decision making, and illustrates the key issues related to reliability, validity and responsiveness that systematic review authors should consider when including PROs. It also addresses the structure and content of PROs and provides guidance for combining information from different PROs. The chapter outlines a step-by-step approach to addressing each of these elements in the systematic review process. The focus is on the use of PROs in randomized trials, and what is crucial in this context when selecting PROs to include in a meta-analysis. The chapter describes PROMs in more detail and discusses some issues to consider when deciding which PROMs to address in a review.

Advanced search in
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arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
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arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4,290 Research products, page 1 of 429
  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Kuo-Ting Chen; Jim Nieuwenhuizen; Maryana Handula; Yann Seimbille;
    Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
    Country: Netherlands

    We herein describe the development of a novel dual-modality optical/radio-imaging agent for general and site-specific labeling of biovectors through a 2-cyanobenzothiazole (CBT)/1,2-aminothiol click reaction. The CBT-based multifunctional single-attachment-point (MSAP) agent enables a single-step synthesis of various dual-modality probes characterized by rapid conjugation, high labeling yields, metabolically stable products and applicability to orthogonal two-step labeling of sensitive biomolecules. In addition, the two-step radiolabeling protocol and click reaction were optimized by using CBT scavengers to improve the reaction rate and molar activity of the imaging probes. Our methodology allows for a simple and efficient synthetic route to produce a variety of dual-modality imaging agents for preoperative surgical planning and intraoperative surgical guidance.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Jean Sánchez-Sánchez; Janis Alarcón-Loayza; Luz Villa-Castillo; Mikashmi Kohli; Catharina Boehme; Sergio Carmona; Patricia J. Garcia; Madhukar Pai; Cesar Ugarte-Gil;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: Peru

    Even though the WHO Essential Medicines List has been published and updated for the last 40 years, diagnostics only got their due recognition in the last two years. WHO published the first Essential Diagnostics List (EDL) in 2018 and subsequently updated in 2019...

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Mathieu Lempereur; Adel Aminian; Jacqueline Saw;
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Belgium
  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Gower-Rousseau, C.; Sarter, H.; Savoye, G.; Tavernier, N.; Fumery, M.; Sandborn, W. J.; Feagan, B. G.; Duhamel, A.; Guillon-Dellac, N.; Colombel, J.-F.; +31 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Belgium, France

    Background: IBDs are chronic destructive disorders that negatively affect the functional status of patients. Recently, the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Disability Index (IBD-DI) was developed according to standard WHO processes. The aims of the current study were to validate the IBD-DI in an independent patient cohort, to develop an index-specific scoring system and to describe the disability status of a well-defined population-based cohort of French patients with IBD. Methods: From February 2012 to March 2014, the IBD-DI questionnaire was administered to a random sample of adult patients with an established diagnosis of IBD issued from a French population-based registry. The IBD-DI consists of 28 items that evaluate the four domains of body functions, activity participation, body structures and environmental factors. Validation included item reduction and data structure, construct validity, internal consistency, interobserver and intraobserver reliability evaluations. Results: 150 patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and 50 patients with UC completed the IBD-DI validation phase. The intraclass correlation coefficient for interobserver reliability was 0.91 and 0.54 for intraobserver reliability. Cronbach's α of internal consistency was 0.86. IBD-DI scores varied from 0 to 100 with a mean of 35.3 (Q1=19.6; Q3=51.8). IBD-DI scores were highly correlated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire (-0.82; p<0.001) and SF-36 (-0.61; p<0.05) scores. Female gender (p<0.001), clinical disease activity (p<0.0001) and disease duration (p=0.02) were associated with higher IBD-DI scores. Conclusions: The IBD-DI has been validated for use in clinical trials and epidemiological studies. The IBD-DI showed high internal consistency, interobserver reliability and construct validity, and a moderate intraobserver reliability. It comprises 14 questions and ranges from 0 to 100. The mean IBD-DI score was 35.3 and was associated with gender, clinical disease activity and disease duration. Further research is needed to confirm the structural validity and to assess the responsiveness of IBD-DI. Trial registration number: 2011-A00877-34. © 2017, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved. Programme Hospitalier de Recherche Clinique Inter Regional» 2011

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Stephanie Child; Steven Stewart; Spencer Moore;
    Country: Netherlands

    Abstract Background Cross-sectional research suggests social capital has negative consequences for problem drinking behaviors. Previous studies have suggested psychosocial resources, including perceived control, may buffer this association. Little research has examined whether such relationships persist longitudinally. Methods Random effects models examined between-person relationships among problem drinking, social capital, and perceived control, and whether perceived control moderated the relationship between social capital and drinking. Fixed effects models assessed whether social capital and perceived control were related to changes in problem drinking. Results Greater network capital and generalized trust predicted higher odds of binge drinking (RR = 1.08; 95% CI = 1.03-1.12 and RR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.03-1.48, respectively). Perceived control moderated the positive association of network capital with binge drinking (RR = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.87-0.96). Conclusions The present findings support previous notions about the complex role of social capital on health, and offer new insights on the role of perceived control on problem drinking.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    Alice Bonnefoy-Mazure; Thibault Favre; Guillaume Praplan; Stéphane Armand; Yoshimasa Sagawa Junior; Didier Hannouche; Katia Turcot; Anne Lübbeke; Hermès Howard Miozzari;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Switzerland

    Abstract Background The purpose of this prospective study was to understand the relation between gait outcomes and patient satisfaction one year after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Methods Seventy-nine patients were evaluated before and one year after TKA using clinical gait analysis. Specific gait outcomes were analyzed: gait speed, stance phase, range of motion (ROM) knee flexion and maximal knee flexion. The parameters of interest selected for the statistical analysis were: gait speed and maximal knee flexion during gait. The Western Ontario and MacMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and patient satisfaction were also assessed. The satisfaction was evaluated using a questionnaire and was splited in five categories: very unsatisfied, unsatisfied, neutral, satisfied or very satisfied. To assess associations between patient satisfaction and maximal knee flexion during gait and gait speed, an unadjusted ordinal logistic regression analysis was used. The analysis was then adjusted for covariates: age and Body Mass Index (BMI) before surgery and WOMAC pain one year after surgery. Results All gait outcomes after TKA had significantly improved. The ordinal logistic regression analysis found significant associations between patient satisfaction and maximal knee flexion after TKA (unadjusted and adjusted) but not for gait speed. Conclusion These findings show that all patients improved their gait outcomes one year after TKA but only a higher maximal knee flexion during gait may influence the level of patient satisfaction.

  • Restricted
    Authors: 
    F. Stelma; M.H. van der Ree; Leo Jansen; Marion G. Peters; Harry L.A. Janssen; Hans L. Zaaijer; R. Bart Takkenberg; Henk W. Reesink;
    Country: Netherlands

    Combining peginterferon-alfa-2a (pegIFN) with a nucleotide analogue can result in higher rates of HBsAg loss than either therapy given alone. Here, we investigated the durability of the response to combination therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients after 5 years of follow-up. In the initial study, 92 CHB patients (44 HBeAg-positive, 48 HBeAg-negative) with HBV DNA >100 000 c/mL (~20 000 IU/mL) and active hepatitis were treated for 48 weeks with pegIFN 180 μg/week and 10 mg adefovir dipivoxil daily. For the long-term follow-up (LTFU) study, patients were followed up for 5 years after the end of treatment. At year 5, 70 (32 HBeAg-positive, 38 HBeAg-negative) patients remained in the study. At year 5, 19% (6/32) of HBeAg-positive patients and 16% (6/38) of HBeAg-negative patients lost HBsAg, and no HBsAg seroreversion was observed. The 5-year cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for HBsAg loss was 17.2% for HBeAg-positive patients and 19.3% for HBeAg-negative patients. Fourteen of sixteen patients who lost HBsAg at any time point during follow-up developed anti-HBs antibodies (>10 IU/L). At year 5, in total 63% (20/32) of HBeAg-positive and 71% (27/38) of HBeAg-negative patients were retreated with nucleos(t)ide analogues during follow-up. The cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for retreatment was 60% of patients at year 5. At year 5 of follow-up, 18% of CHB patients treated with pegIFN/nucleotide analogue combination therapy had durable HBsAg loss and 88% of these had developed anti-HBs antibodies.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2019
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Jessica Chan; Jeppe Friborg; Mikhail Chernov; Mikhail Cherkashin; Cai Grau; Michael Brundage; Ben J. Slotman;
    Country: Netherlands

    Summary Cancer is a substantial health burden for Inuit populations, an Indigenous peoples who primarily inhabit the circumpolar regions of Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Russia. Access to radiotherapy is lacking or absent in many of these regions, despite it being an essential component of cancer treatment. This Review presents an overview of factors influencing radiotherapy delivery in each of the four circumpolar Inuit regions, which include population and geography, health-systems infrastructure, and cancer epidemiology. This Review also provides insight into the complex patient pathways needed to access radiotherapy, and on radiotherapy use. The unique challenges in delivering radiotherapy to circumpolar Inuit populations are discussed, which, notably, include geographical and cultural barriers. Recommendations include models of care that have successfully addressed these barriers, and highlight the need for increased collaboration between circumpolar referral centres in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Russia to ultimately allow for better delivery of cancer treatment.

  • Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Maxime Lussier; Stéphane Adam; Belkacem Chikhaoui; Charles Consel; Mathieu Gagnon; Brigitte Gilbert; Sylvain Giroux; Manon Guay; Carol Hudon; Hélène Imbeault; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: Belgium, France, France

    Background Functional assessment is of paramount importance when mild cognitive impairment is suspected, but common assessment tools such as questionnaires lack sensitivity. An alternative and innovative approach consists in using sensor technology in smart apartments during scenario-based assessments of instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). However, studies that investigate this approach are scarce and the technology used is not always transposable in healthcare settings. Objective To explore whether simple and wireless technology used in two different smart environments could add value to performance and rater-based measures of IADL when it comes to predicting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in older adults. Methods Twenty-six (26) cognitively healthy older adults (CH) and 22 older adults with MCI were recruited. Functional performance in a set of five scripted tasks was evaluated with sensor-based observations (motion, contact, and electric sensors) and performance-based measures (rated with videotapes). The five tasks could be performed in any order and were detailed on an instruction sheet given to participants. Results Sensor-based observations showed that participants with MCI spent more time in the kitchen and looking into the fridge and kitchen cabinets than CH participants. Moreover, these measures were negatively associated with memory and executive performances of participants and significantly contributed to the prediction of MCI. Conclusion Simple, wireless, and sensor-based technology holds potential for the detection of MCI in older adults as they perform daily tasks. However, some limits are discussed and we offer recommendations to improve the usefulness of this innovative approach.

  • Publication . Part of book or chapter of book . Other literature type . 2019
    Restricted English
    Authors: 
    Johnston, Bradley C.; Patrick, Donald L.; Devji, Tahira; Maxwell, Lara J.; Bingham, Clifton O.; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Boers, Maarten; Briel, Matthias; Busse, Jason W.; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; +19 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Netherlands

    Authors of systematic reviews that include patient-reported outcomes (PROs) should have a good understanding of how patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are developed, including the constructs they are intended to measure, their reliability, validity and responsiveness. This chapter describes the category of outcomes known as PROs and their importance for healthcare decision making, and illustrates the key issues related to reliability, validity and responsiveness that systematic review authors should consider when including PROs. It also addresses the structure and content of PROs and provides guidance for combining information from different PROs. The chapter outlines a step-by-step approach to addressing each of these elements in the systematic review process. The focus is on the use of PROs in randomized trials, and what is crucial in this context when selecting PROs to include in a meta-analysis. The chapter describes PROMs in more detail and discusses some issues to consider when deciding which PROMs to address in a review.