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103 Research products, page 1 of 11

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Latostenmaa, Kaarina; Aarola, Nina;
    Publisher: Satakunnan ammattikorkeakoulu
    Country: Finland
    Project: CIHR
  • English
    Authors: 
    Gillis, Doris E.;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: CIHR

    At a time when health literacy is emerging as a central concern in the health field, this thesis examines whether and how practitioners involved in the promotion of breastfeeding incorporate dimensions of health literacy as described in the current literature. Although there is little evidence that practitioners are familiar with specific definitions of health literacy, their description of practices reflected various facets of health literacy including functional health literacy, interactive and critical health literacy, and health literacy as composed of multiple literacies. This qualitative case study was set in a rural health district in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia where breastfeeding initiation and duration rates are lower than national averages and where health literacy was identified as a community health issue. In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 30 professional and lay practitioners. Practices in one hospital-based and two community-based settings were observed. Data were analyzed for themes using an iterative process of constant comparison. Interview informants and mothers provided feedback on preliminary findings in focus group interviews. Findings reflect an emphasis on the transmission of information to persuade mothers to breastfeed, in contrast to strengthening their capacity to use information in making or acting on choices about how to feed their babies. Practitioners’ discomfort in identifying clients with low literacy skills raises fundamental concerns about the stigma associated with low literacy. A focus on the functional health literacy deficiencies of clients, not on their capacities, appears limiting in addressing the complexities of breastfeeding promotion. There is little evidence of practices which reflect critical health literacy or efforts to reduce structural barriers to breastfeeding. In conclusion, the study suggests that practitioners’ engagement in critical reflection of their breastfeeding promotion practices through the multidimensional frame of health literacy could help to further their practice and the conceptual development of health literacy.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holstege, Henne; Grozeva, Detelina; Sims, Rebecca; Luckcuck, Lauren; Denning, Nicola; Marshall, Rachel; Saad, Salha; Williams, Julie; Meggy, Alun; Lambert, Jean-Charles; +79 more
    Publisher: medRxiv
    Project: NIH | DATA MANAGEMENT AND BIOST... (5P50AG023501-03), NIH | Replication and Extension... (3U01AG052410-04S1), NIH | Gene discovery in PSP by ... (3R01NS080820-02S1), EC | ENGAGE (201413), NIH | CHS-Transition Phase -268... (N01HC055222-001), NIH | ALZHEIMERS DISEASE DATA C... (5U01AG016976-03), NIH | GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGICAL S... (5R01AG009029-03), NWO | NCHA Subsidiebesluit 2008... (050-060-810), NIH | UC Davis Alzheimer's Core... (3P30AG010129-28S1), NIH | Large Scale Sequencing an... (3U54HG003067-07S1),...

    The genetic component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been mainly assessed using Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which do not capture the risk contributed by rare variants. Here, we compared the gene-based burden of rare damaging variants in exome sequencing data from 32,558 individuals —16,036 AD cases and 16,522 controls— in a two-stage analysis. Next to known genes TREM2, SORL1 and ABCA7, we observed a significant association of rare, predicted damaging variants in ATP8B4 and ABCA1 with AD risk, and a suggestive signal in ADAM10. Next to these genes, the rare variant burden in RIN3, CLU, ZCWPW1 and ACE highlighted these genes as potential driver genes in AD-GWAS loci. Rare damaging variants in these genes, and in particular loss-of-function variants, have a large effect on AD-risk, and they are enriched in early onset AD cases. The newly identified AD-associated genes provide additional evidence for a major role for APP-processing, Aβ-aggregation, lipid metabolism and microglial function in AD.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Iwanow, Rod;
    Country: Canada
    Project: CIHR

    Canadian healthcare organizations are experiencing increasing challenges meeting the evolving health needs of aging and growing populations. The ability to manage conflict between multiple stakeholders with varying priorities, responsibilities and associations relative to the healthcare organization is critical to more effectively meet these challenges. The following qualitative research explores factors that contribute to conflict within a multidisciplinary healthcare teams setting and between regulated health professionals. Four registered nurses from an acute care hospital setting in a large metropolitan center were recruited to share their experiences of multidisciplinary team conflict through the use of facilitated focus group sessions. A thematic analysis revealed four main themes perceived as contributing to conflict: team discordance, professional expectations, relational conflict and communication barriers. These findings expand the current limited body of research while aiding the development of best practice tools and guidelines for healthcare organizations.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gagnon, Jeffrey; Brubaker, Patricia L.;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Project: CIHR
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borda-Rodriguez, Alexander;
    Publisher: Innovation Knowledge Development
    Project: CIHR

    Effective delivery in the fields of development aid and healthcare relies on knowledge and its communication. Institutions, practitioners and the end-users are examined in these two fields as key actors in the production and communication of knowledge. Similarities and differences, and strengths and weaknesses of their approaches to knowledge are compared. Knowledge is shown to be an intrinsically political process in which institutions and practitioners play a critical role in its communication. Establishing a common background is essential to communicate knowledge effectively. The World Bank’s notion that knowledge is a simple commodity should be challenged.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bozat-Emre, Songul;
    Country: Canada
    Project: CIHR

    Falls among older adults (age 65 years and older) residing in personal care homes (PCHs) are an important health concern. Atypical antipsychotic drugs (AADs) have been shown to be associated with fall risk among older adults. However, previous studies face some methodological limitations that affect the quality, consistency, and comparability of these studies. Therefore, a population-based study was undertaken to examine the effect of AAD use on the risk of falling among older PCH residents. A nested case-control study was conducted using the administrative healthcare records and Minimum Data Set for PCHs (MDS) housed at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba. The study period was from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2007. Cases (n=626) were fallers as recorded in MDS. Using incidence density sampling, each case was matched to four controls on length of PCH stay, age, and sex (n=2,388). Exposure to AADs was obtained from the Drug Program Information Network database. Conditional logistic regression was used to model the effects of AAD use on the risk of falling while accounting for matching and for confounding of other covariates. While the adjusted odds of falling was statistically greater for AAD users versus nonusers (adjusted odds ratio = 1.60, 95% CI 1.10-2.32), this association was type and dose dependent. Compared to nonusers, the odds of falling was greater for quetiapine users, regardless of this drug's dose, and high dose risperidone users. On the other hand, low dose risperidone and olanzapine, irrespective of drug dose, use was not associated with the risk of falling. Furthermore, the effect of AAD use, in general, on the risk of falling was significantly greater for people with wandering problems (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84, 95% CI 1.09-3.09). Despite some methodological limitations, this research has provided some unique findings that enhance our understanding of AAD use as a fall risk factor. Study findings allow policymakers to further develop evidence-based interventions specific to AADs in order to better manage falls in the PCH setting. However, a great deal of research is still needed to address other important unanswered questions.

  • Other research product . 2010
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Greyson, Devon; Morrison, Heather; Waller, Andrew;
    Publisher: Canadian Library Association
    Project: NSERC , CIHR , SSHRC

    This article is a summary of recent Open Access activity in Canada, focusing on policies and mandates, repositories, and initiatives in libraries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wang, Gu-Qi;
    Country: Canada
    Project: CIHR
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Greyson, Devon; Morgan, Steven; Hanley, Gillian; Wahyuni, Desy;
    Publisher: NRC Research Press
    Project: CIHR

    Promoting uptake of research findings is an objective common to those who fund, produce and publish health services and policy research. Open access (OA) is one method being employed to maximize impact. OA articles are online, free to access and use. This paper contributes to growing body of research exploring the “OA advantage” by employing an article-level analysis comparing citation rates for articles drawn from the same, purposively selected journals. We used a two-stage analytic approach designed to test whether OA is associated with (1) likelihood that an article is cited at all and (2) total number citations that an article receives, conditional on being cited at least once. Adjusting for potential confounders: number of authors, time since publication, journal, and article subject, we found that OA archived articles were 60% more likely to be cited at least once, and, once cited, were cited 29% more than non-OA articles.

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
103 Research products, page 1 of 11
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Latostenmaa, Kaarina; Aarola, Nina;
    Publisher: Satakunnan ammattikorkeakoulu
    Country: Finland
    Project: CIHR
  • English
    Authors: 
    Gillis, Doris E.;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: CIHR

    At a time when health literacy is emerging as a central concern in the health field, this thesis examines whether and how practitioners involved in the promotion of breastfeeding incorporate dimensions of health literacy as described in the current literature. Although there is little evidence that practitioners are familiar with specific definitions of health literacy, their description of practices reflected various facets of health literacy including functional health literacy, interactive and critical health literacy, and health literacy as composed of multiple literacies. This qualitative case study was set in a rural health district in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia where breastfeeding initiation and duration rates are lower than national averages and where health literacy was identified as a community health issue. In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 30 professional and lay practitioners. Practices in one hospital-based and two community-based settings were observed. Data were analyzed for themes using an iterative process of constant comparison. Interview informants and mothers provided feedback on preliminary findings in focus group interviews. Findings reflect an emphasis on the transmission of information to persuade mothers to breastfeed, in contrast to strengthening their capacity to use information in making or acting on choices about how to feed their babies. Practitioners’ discomfort in identifying clients with low literacy skills raises fundamental concerns about the stigma associated with low literacy. A focus on the functional health literacy deficiencies of clients, not on their capacities, appears limiting in addressing the complexities of breastfeeding promotion. There is little evidence of practices which reflect critical health literacy or efforts to reduce structural barriers to breastfeeding. In conclusion, the study suggests that practitioners’ engagement in critical reflection of their breastfeeding promotion practices through the multidimensional frame of health literacy could help to further their practice and the conceptual development of health literacy.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Holstege, Henne; Grozeva, Detelina; Sims, Rebecca; Luckcuck, Lauren; Denning, Nicola; Marshall, Rachel; Saad, Salha; Williams, Julie; Meggy, Alun; Lambert, Jean-Charles; +79 more
    Publisher: medRxiv
    Project: NIH | DATA MANAGEMENT AND BIOST... (5P50AG023501-03), NIH | Replication and Extension... (3U01AG052410-04S1), NIH | Gene discovery in PSP by ... (3R01NS080820-02S1), EC | ENGAGE (201413), NIH | CHS-Transition Phase -268... (N01HC055222-001), NIH | ALZHEIMERS DISEASE DATA C... (5U01AG016976-03), NIH | GENETIC EPIDEMIOLOGICAL S... (5R01AG009029-03), NWO | NCHA Subsidiebesluit 2008... (050-060-810), NIH | UC Davis Alzheimer's Core... (3P30AG010129-28S1), NIH | Large Scale Sequencing an... (3U54HG003067-07S1),...

    The genetic component of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been mainly assessed using Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which do not capture the risk contributed by rare variants. Here, we compared the gene-based burden of rare damaging variants in exome sequencing data from 32,558 individuals —16,036 AD cases and 16,522 controls— in a two-stage analysis. Next to known genes TREM2, SORL1 and ABCA7, we observed a significant association of rare, predicted damaging variants in ATP8B4 and ABCA1 with AD risk, and a suggestive signal in ADAM10. Next to these genes, the rare variant burden in RIN3, CLU, ZCWPW1 and ACE highlighted these genes as potential driver genes in AD-GWAS loci. Rare damaging variants in these genes, and in particular loss-of-function variants, have a large effect on AD-risk, and they are enriched in early onset AD cases. The newly identified AD-associated genes provide additional evidence for a major role for APP-processing, Aβ-aggregation, lipid metabolism and microglial function in AD.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Iwanow, Rod;
    Country: Canada
    Project: CIHR

    Canadian healthcare organizations are experiencing increasing challenges meeting the evolving health needs of aging and growing populations. The ability to manage conflict between multiple stakeholders with varying priorities, responsibilities and associations relative to the healthcare organization is critical to more effectively meet these challenges. The following qualitative research explores factors that contribute to conflict within a multidisciplinary healthcare teams setting and between regulated health professionals. Four registered nurses from an acute care hospital setting in a large metropolitan center were recruited to share their experiences of multidisciplinary team conflict through the use of facilitated focus group sessions. A thematic analysis revealed four main themes perceived as contributing to conflict: team discordance, professional expectations, relational conflict and communication barriers. These findings expand the current limited body of research while aiding the development of best practice tools and guidelines for healthcare organizations.

  • Other research product . Other ORP type
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gagnon, Jeffrey; Brubaker, Patricia L.;
    Publisher: Springer International Publishing
    Project: CIHR
  • Other research product . Other ORP type . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borda-Rodriguez, Alexander;
    Publisher: Innovation Knowledge Development
    Project: CIHR

    Effective delivery in the fields of development aid and healthcare relies on knowledge and its communication. Institutions, practitioners and the end-users are examined in these two fields as key actors in the production and communication of knowledge. Similarities and differences, and strengths and weaknesses of their approaches to knowledge are compared. Knowledge is shown to be an intrinsically political process in which institutions and practitioners play a critical role in its communication. Establishing a common background is essential to communicate knowledge effectively. The World Bank’s notion that knowledge is a simple commodity should be challenged.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bozat-Emre, Songul;
    Country: Canada
    Project: CIHR

    Falls among older adults (age 65 years and older) residing in personal care homes (PCHs) are an important health concern. Atypical antipsychotic drugs (AADs) have been shown to be associated with fall risk among older adults. However, previous studies face some methodological limitations that affect the quality, consistency, and comparability of these studies. Therefore, a population-based study was undertaken to examine the effect of AAD use on the risk of falling among older PCH residents. A nested case-control study was conducted using the administrative healthcare records and Minimum Data Set for PCHs (MDS) housed at the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy in the Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba. The study period was from April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2007. Cases (n=626) were fallers as recorded in MDS. Using incidence density sampling, each case was matched to four controls on length of PCH stay, age, and sex (n=2,388). Exposure to AADs was obtained from the Drug Program Information Network database. Conditional logistic regression was used to model the effects of AAD use on the risk of falling while accounting for matching and for confounding of other covariates. While the adjusted odds of falling was statistically greater for AAD users versus nonusers (adjusted odds ratio = 1.60, 95% CI 1.10-2.32), this association was type and dose dependent. Compared to nonusers, the odds of falling was greater for quetiapine users, regardless of this drug's dose, and high dose risperidone users. On the other hand, low dose risperidone and olanzapine, irrespective of drug dose, use was not associated with the risk of falling. Furthermore, the effect of AAD use, in general, on the risk of falling was significantly greater for people with wandering problems (adjusted odds ratio = 1.84, 95% CI 1.09-3.09). Despite some methodological limitations, this research has provided some unique findings that enhance our understanding of AAD use as a fall risk factor. Study findings allow policymakers to further develop evidence-based interventions specific to AADs in order to better manage falls in the PCH setting. However, a great deal of research is still needed to address other important unanswered questions.

  • Other research product . 2010
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Greyson, Devon; Morrison, Heather; Waller, Andrew;
    Publisher: Canadian Library Association
    Project: NSERC , CIHR , SSHRC

    This article is a summary of recent Open Access activity in Canada, focusing on policies and mandates, repositories, and initiatives in libraries.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Wang, Gu-Qi;
    Country: Canada
    Project: CIHR
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Greyson, Devon; Morgan, Steven; Hanley, Gillian; Wahyuni, Desy;
    Publisher: NRC Research Press
    Project: CIHR

    Promoting uptake of research findings is an objective common to those who fund, produce and publish health services and policy research. Open access (OA) is one method being employed to maximize impact. OA articles are online, free to access and use. This paper contributes to growing body of research exploring the “OA advantage” by employing an article-level analysis comparing citation rates for articles drawn from the same, purposively selected journals. We used a two-stage analytic approach designed to test whether OA is associated with (1) likelihood that an article is cited at all and (2) total number citations that an article receives, conditional on being cited at least once. Adjusting for potential confounders: number of authors, time since publication, journal, and article subject, we found that OA archived articles were 60% more likely to be cited at least once, and, once cited, were cited 29% more than non-OA articles.