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  • Research data . 2008
    English
    Authors: 
    Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Udry, J. Richard;
    Publisher: ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
    Project: NIH | Linkage Disequilibrium St... (5R01AA011330-07), NIH | University of Minnesota C... (8UL1TR000114-02), NIH | Carolina Population Cente... (3R24HD050924-05S1), AKA | MSDs@LIFECOURSE CONSORTIU... (129378), ARC | Quantitative and Molecula... (DP0212016), NIH | PROSTATE, LUNG, COLORECTA... (N01CN075022-018), NIH | PROSTATE, LUNG, COLORECTA... (N01CN025518-043), NIH | Genetic Risk to Stroke in... (5U01HG004436-02), NSF | Machine learning techniqu... (0823313), NIH | PROSTATE, LUNG, COLORECTA... (N01CN025404-013),...

    A Data Guide for this study is available as a web page and for download. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), 1994-2008 [Public Use] is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort was followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent conducted in 2008 when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Add Health Wave I data collection took place between September 1994 and December 1995, and included both an in-school questionnaire and in-home interview. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12, and gathered information on social and demographic characteristics of adolescent respondents, education and occupation of parents, household structure, expectations for the future, self-esteem, health status, risk behaviors, friendships, and school-year extracurricular activities. All students listed on a sample school's roster were eligible for selection into the core in-home interview sample. In-home interviews included topics such as health status, health-facility utilization, nutrition, peer networks, decision-making processes, family composition and dynamics, educational aspirations and expectations, employment experience, romantic and sexual partnerships, substance use, and criminal activities. A parent, preferably the resident mother, of each adolescent respondent interviewed in Wave I was also asked to complete an interviewer-assisted questionnaire covering topics such as inheritable health conditions, marriages and marriage-like relationships, neighborhood characteristics, involvement in volunteer, civic, and school activities, health-affecting behaviors, education and employment, household income and economic assistance, parent-adolescent communication and interaction, parent's familiarity with the adolescent's friends and friends' parents. Add Health data collection recommenced for Wave II from April to August 1996, and included almost 15,000 follow-up in-home interviews with adolescents from Wave I. Interview questions were generally similar to Wave I, but also included questions about sun exposure and more detailed nutrition questions. Respondents were asked to report their height and weight during the course of the interview, and were also weighed and measured by the interviewer. From August 2001 to April 2002, Wave III data were collected through in-home interviews with 15,170 Wave I respondents (now 18 to 26 years old), as well as interviews with their partners. Respondents were administered survey questions designed to obtain information about family, relationships, sexual experiences, childbearing, and educational histories, labor force involvement, civic participation, religion and spirituality, mental health, health insurance, illness, delinquency and violence, gambling, substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. High School Transcript Release Forms were also collected at Wave III, and these data comprise the Education Data component of the Add Health study. Wave IV in-home interviews were conducted in 2008 and 2009 when the original Wave I respondents were 24 to 32 years old. Longitudinal survey data were collected on the social, economic, psychological, and health circumstances of respondents, as well as longitudinal geographic data. Survey questions were expanded on educational transitions, economic status and financial resources and strains, sleep patterns and sleep quality, eating habits and nutrition, illnesses and medications, physical activities, emotional content and quality of current or most recent romantic/cohabiting/marriage relationships, and maltreatment during childhood by caregivers. Dates and circumstances of key life events occurring in young adulthood were also recorded, including a complete marriage and cohabitation history, full pregnancy and fertility histories from both men and women, an educational history of dates of degrees and school attendance, contact with the criminal justice system, military service, and various employment events, including the date of first and current jobs, with respective information on occupation, industry, wages, hours, and benefits. Finally, physical measurements and biospecimens were also collected at Wave IV, and included anthropometric measures of weight, height and waist circumference, cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse, metabolic measures from dried blood spots assayed for lipids, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), measures of inflammation and immune function, including High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Wave I: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS2: Wave I: Public Use Contextual Database DS3: Wave I: Network Variables DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS5: Wave II: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS6: Wave II: Public Use Contextual Database DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS8: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS9: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 17: Relationships) DS10: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancies) DS11: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Relationships in Detail) DS12: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 22: Completed Pregnancies) DS13: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 23: Current Pregnancies) DS14: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 24: Live Births) DS15: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 25: Children and Parenting) DS16: Wave III: Public Use Education Data DS17: Wave III: Public Use Graduation Data DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS20: Wave III: Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT), Public Use DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS22: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS23: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Relationships) DS24: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16C: Relationships) DS25: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancy Table) DS26: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Live Births) DS27: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 20A: Children and Parenting) DS28: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS29: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS30: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Lipids DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights Wave I: The Stage 1 in-school sample was a stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school -- a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade -- was also recruited from the community. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12. The Stage 2 in-home sample of 27,000 adolescents consisted of a core sample from each community, plus selected special over samples. Eligibility for over samples was determined by an adolescent's responses on the in-school questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample.; Wave II: The Wave II in-home interview surveyed almost 15,000 of the same students one year after Wave I.; Wave III: The in-home Wave III sample consists of over 15,000 Wave I respondents who could be located and re-interviewed six years later.; Wave IV: All original Wave I in-home respondents were eligible for in-home interviews at Wave IV. At Wave IV, the Add Health sample was dispersed across the nation with respondents living in all 50 states. Administrators were able to locate 92.5% of the Wave IV sample and interviewed 80.3% of eligible sample members. ; For additional information on sampling, including detailed information on special oversamples, please see the Add Health Study Design page. Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II focused on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study expanded and evolved. Wave III explored adolescent experiences and behaviors related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. Wave IV expanded to examine developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood, using an integrative study design which combined social, behavioral, and biomedical measures data collection. Response Rates: Response rates for each wave were as follows: Wave I: 79 percent; Wave II: 88.6 percent; Wave III: 77.4 percent; Wave IV: 80.3 percent; Adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. Respondents were geographically located in the United States. audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI) computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) computer-assisted self interview (CASI) paper and pencil interview (PAPI) face-to-face interview

  • English
    Authors: 
    Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Udry, J. Richard;
    Publisher: ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
    Project: NIH | University of Minnesota C... (8UL1TR000114-02), NIH | Carolina Population Cente... (3R24HD050924-05S1), NIH | NATURAL HISTORY OF ALCOHO... (5R01AA007728-04), EC | GMI (230374), NIH | Intergenerational Researc... (5K07CA124905-02), NIH | Population Research Train... (5T32HD007168-39), NIH | Genetics of Opioid Depend... (5R01DA012690-15), NIH | Statistical Methods for G... (5R01CA133996-02), NIH | Consortium for Neuropsych... (8UL1DE019580-02), AKA | MSDs@LIFECOURSE CONSORTIU... (129378),...

    Downloads of Add Health require submission of the following information, which is shared with the original producer of Add Health: supervisor name, supervisor email, and reason for download. A Data Guide for this study is available as a web page and for download. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), 1994-2018 [Public Use] is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort was followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent conducted in 2008 when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Add Health Wave I data collection took place between September 1994 and December 1995, and included both an in-school questionnaire and in-home interview. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12, and gathered information on social and demographic characteristics of adolescent respondents, education and occupation of parents, household structure, expectations for the future, self-esteem, health status, risk behaviors, friendships, and school-year extracurricular activities. All students listed on a sample school's roster were eligible for selection into the core in-home interview sample. In-home interviews included topics such as health status, health-facility utilization, nutrition, peer networks, decision-making processes, family composition and dynamics, educational aspirations and expectations, employment experience, romantic and sexual partnerships, substance use, and criminal activities. A parent, preferably the resident mother, of each adolescent respondent interviewed in Wave I was also asked to complete an interviewer-assisted questionnaire covering topics such as inheritable health conditions, marriages and marriage-like relationships, neighborhood characteristics, involvement in volunteer, civic, and school activities, health-affecting behaviors, education and employment, household income and economic assistance, parent-adolescent communication and interaction, parent's familiarity with the adolescent's friends and friends' parents. Add Health data collection recommenced for Wave II from April to August 1996, and included almost 15,000 follow-up in-home interviews with adolescents from Wave I. Interview questions were generally similar to Wave I, but also included questions about sun exposure and more detailed nutrition questions. Respondents were asked to report their height and weight during the course of the interview, and were also weighed and measured by the interviewer. From August 2001 to April 2002, Wave III data were collected through in-home interviews with 15,170 Wave I respondents (now 18 to 26 years old), as well as interviews with their partners. Respondents were administered survey questions designed to obtain information about family, relationships, sexual experiences, childbearing, and educational histories, labor force involvement, civic participation, religion and spirituality, mental health, health insurance, illness, delinquency and violence, gambling, substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. High School Transcript Release Forms were also collected at Wave III, and these data comprise the Education Data component of the Add Health study. Wave IV in-home interviews were conducted in 2008 and 2009 when the original Wave I respondents were 24 to 32 years old. Longitudinal survey data were collected on the social, economic, psychological, and health circumstances of respondents, as well as longitudinal geographic data. Survey questions were expanded on educational transitions, economic status and financial resources and strains, sleep patterns and sleep quality, eating habits and nutrition, illnesses and medications, physical activities, emotional content and quality of current or most recent romantic/cohabiting/marriage relationships, and maltreatment during childhood by caregivers. Dates and circumstances of key life events occurring in young adulthood were also recorded, including a complete marriage and cohabitation history, full pregnancy and fertility histories from both men and women, an educational history of dates of degrees and school attendance, contact with the criminal justice system, military service, and various employment events, including the date of first and current jobs, with respective information on occupation, industry, wages, hours, and benefits. Finally, physical measurements and biospecimens were also collected at Wave IV, and included anthropometric measures of weight, height and waist circumference, cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse, metabolic measures from dried blood spots assayed for lipids, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), measures of inflammation and immune function, including High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Wave V data collection took place from 2016 to 2018, when the original Wave I respondents were 33 to 43 years old. For the first time, a mixed mode survey design was used. In addition, several experiments were embedded in early phases of the data collection to test response to various treatments. A similar range of data was collected on social, environmental, economic, behavioral, and health circumstances of respondents, with the addition of retrospective child health and socio-economic status questions. Physical measurements and biospecimens were again collected at Wave V, and included most of the same measures as at Wave IV. Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Wave I: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS2: Wave I: Public Use Contextual Database DS3: Wave I: Network Variables DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS5: Wave II: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS6: Wave II: Public Use Contextual Database DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS8: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS9: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 17: Relationships) DS10: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancies) DS11: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Relationships in Detail) DS12: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 22: Completed Pregnancies) DS13: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 23: Current Pregnancies) DS14: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 24: Live Births) DS15: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 25: Children and Parenting) DS16: Wave III: Public Use Education Data DS17: Wave III: Public Use Graduation Data DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS20: Wave III: Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT), Public Use DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS22: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS23: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Relationships) DS24: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16C: Relationships) DS25: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancy Table) DS26: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Live Births) DS27: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 20A: Children and Parenting) DS28: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS29: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS30: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Lipids DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights DS32: Wave V: Mixed-Mode Survey, Public Use Sample DS33: Wave V: Mixed-Mode Survey, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Pregnancy, Live Births, Children and Parenting) DS34: Wave V: Biomarkers, Anthropometrics DS35: Wave V: Biomarkers, Cardiovascular Measures DS36: Wave V: Biomarkers, Demographics DS37: Wave V: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS38: Wave V: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS39: Wave V: Biomarkers, Lipids DS40: Wave V: Biomarkers, Medication Use DS41: Wave V: Biomarkers, Renal Function DS42: Wave V: Public Use Weights Wave I: The Stage 1 in-school sample was a stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school -- a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade -- was also recruited from the community. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12. The Stage 2 in-home sample of 27,000 adolescents consisted of a core sample from each community, plus selected special over samples. Eligibility for over samples was determined by an adolescent's responses on the in-school questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample. Wave II: The Wave II in-home interview surveyed almost 15,000 of the same students one year after Wave I. Wave III: The in-home Wave III sample consists of over 15,000 Wave I respondents who could be located and re-interviewed six years later. Wave IV: All original Wave I in-home respondents were eligible for in-home interviews at Wave IV. At Wave IV, the Add Health sample was dispersed across the nation with respondents living in all 50 states. Administrators were able to locate 92.5% of the Wave IV sample and interviewed 80.3% of eligible sample members. Wave V: All Wave I respondents who were still living were eligible at Wave V, yielding a pool of 19,828 persons. This pool was split into three stratified random samples for the purposes of survey design testing. For additional information on sampling, including detailed information on special oversamples, please see the Add Health Study Design page. audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI); computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI); computer-assisted self interview (CASI); face-to-face interview; mixed mode; paper and pencil interview (PAPI); telephone interviewWave V data files were minimally processed by ICPSR. For value labeling, missing value designation, and question text (where applicable), please see the available P.I. Codebook/Questionnaires. The study-level documentation (Data Guide, User Guide) does not include Wave V datasets.Documentation for Waves prior to Wave V may use an older version of the study title.Users should be aware that version history notes dated prior to 2015-11-09 do not apply to the current organization of the datasets.Please note that dates present in the Summary and Time Period fields are taken from the Add Health Study Design page. The Date of Collection field represents the range of interview dates present in the data files for each wave.Wave I and Wave II field work was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago.Wave III, Wave IV, and Wave V field work was conducted by the Research Triangle Institute.For the most updated list of related publications, please see the Add Health Publications Web site.Additional information on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) series can be found on the Add Health Web site. Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II focused on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study expanded and evolved. Wave III explored adolescent experiences and behaviors related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. Wave IV expanded to examine developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood, using an integrative study design which combined social, behavioral, and biomedical measures data collection. Wave V aimed to track the emergence of chronic disease as the cohort aged into their 30s and early 40s. Add health is a school-based longitudinal study of a nationally-representative sample of adolescents in grates 7-12 in the United States in 1945-45. Over more than 20 years of data collection, data have been collected from adolescents, their fellow students, school administrators, parents, siblings, friends, and romantic partners through multiple data collection components. In addition, existing databases with information about respondents' neighborhoods and communities have been merged with Add Health data, including variables on income poverty, unemployment, availability and utilization of health services, crime, church membership, and social programs and policies. The data files are not weighted. However, the collection features a number of weight variables contained within the following datasets: DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights DS42: Wave V: Public Use Weights Please note that these weights files do not apply to the Biomarker data files. For additional information on the application of weights for data analysis, please see the ICPSR User Guide, or the Guidelines for Analyzing Add Health Data. Response Rates: Response rates for each wave were as follows: Wave I: 79 percent Wave II: 88.6 percent Wave III: 77.4 percent Wave IV: 80.3 percent Wave V: 71.8 percent Adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. Respondents were geographically located in the United States.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nitze, Ingmar; Cooley, Sarah W; Duguay, Claude R; Jones, Benjamin M; Grosse, Guido;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NSERC , EC | PETA-CARB (338335)

    The data publication contains supplementary data to the article "Supplementary Dataset to: The catastrophic thermokarst lake drainage events of 2018 in northwestern Alaska: Fast-forward into the future" This data publication includes four datasets: 1. Lake change datasets for 1999-2014 and 2017-2018 based on Landsat and Sentinel-1 data as Polygon Shapefiles 2. Lake change datasets for 2017 and 2018 based on high-temporal resolution PlanetScope imagery as Polygon Shapefiles and csv. 3. Lake ice simulations for the study area for 1980-2018. 4. Study sites in two versions: a) including seawater and b) clipped to land area. Files are Polygon Shapefiles. The datasets cover the land area of the Baldwin Peninsula and northern Seward Peninsula in north-western Alaska. The datasets are (#1) remote sensing based observations and (#3) modelled data. Methods are described in detail in the original manuscript (open access). Dataset #4 is the extent of the study site in two versions, a) full extent including seawater and b) land only including lakes. The land boundary was clipped with the “Global Self-consistent, Hierarchical, High-resolution Geography Database” (GSHHG; Wessel and Smith, 1996) dataset in scale “h”. The datasets cover different temporal periods and have a different temporal resolution. Data were collected to measure the extent of a rapid and widespread thermokarst lake drainage event in northwestern Alaska in 2018 and to compare the affected number of lakes and area to previous periods. Lake-ice model data were calculated to simulate lake-ice conditions since 1980 and to put the lake-ice and weather conditions in 2017/2018 into context.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Voigt, Carolina; van Delden, Lona; Marushchak, Maija E; Biasi, Christina; Abbott, Benjamin W; Elberling, Bo; Siciliano, Steven D; Sonnentag, Oliver; Stewart, Katherine J; Yang, Yuanhe; +1 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NSERC , AKA | Mechanisms underlying lar... (132045), AKA | Short and long term effec... (307222), UKRI | Methane and other greenho... (NE/I029293/1), AKA | Long term effects of fire... (286685), AKA | Short and long term effec... (294600), EC | PAGE21 (282700), AKA | Towards constraining the ... (314630)

    If not reported, water-filled pore space (WFPS) was calculated as follows: WFPS (%) = VWC/(1-BD/PD)*100, where VWC is the volumetric water content, BD is the bulk density, and PD is the particle density. If BD was not reported, BD was estimated from the SOM content using functions developed for Arctic soils (Hossain et al, 2015) as follows: 0.075+1.301*EXP(-0.06*SOM) for mineral soils, and 0.043*0+4.258*EXP(-0.047*SOM) for organic soils. If not reported, SOM via loss on ignition was derived from the soil carbon content as follows: SOM (%) = C content*2. If the resulting SOM value was >100%, SOM (%) = C content*1.724. PD can be derived as follows (Okruszko, 1971): PD = 0.011*(100-SOM)+1.451 (see references Okruszko, 1971 and Hossain et al, 2015). The term ”topsoil” depends on the exact depths the soil characteristics are reported in the individual publications, but generally the soil layer of 0–10cm was used. Column ”SOC” includes mostly total soil C content (reported in the majority of studies), and on some occasions total organic C. This dataset is a synthesis of published nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from permafrost-affected soils in Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine permafrost regions. The data includes mean N2O flux rates measured under field (in situ) conditions and in intact plant-soil systems (mesocosms) under near-field conditions. The dataset further includes explanatory environmental parameters such as meteorological data, soil physical-chemical properties, as well as site and experimental information. Data has been synthesized from published studies (see 'Further details'), and in some cases the authors of published studies have been contacted for additional site-level information. The dataset includes studies published until 2019. We encourage linking additional N2O flux data from unpublished and future studies with similar metadata structure to this dataset, to produce a comprehensive, findable database for N2O fluxes from permafrost regions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Couture, Nicole; Irrgang, Anna Maria; Pollard, Wayne H; Lantuit, Hugues; Fritz, Michael;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NSERC , EC | Nunataryuk (773421)

    Narrowing uncertainties about carbon cycling is important in the Arctic where rapid environmental changes contribute to enhanced mobilization of carbon. Here we quantify soil organic carbon (SOC) contents of permafrost soils along the Yukon Coastal Plain and determine the annual fluxes from erosion. Different terrain units are assessed based on surficial geology, morphology, and ground ice conditions. To account for the volume of wedge ice and massive ice in a unit, sample SOC contents are reduced by 19% and sediment contents by 16%. The SOC content in a 1 m**2 column of soil varies according to the height of the bluff, ranging from 30 to 662 kg, with a mean value of 183 kg. Forty-four per cent of the SOC is within the top 1 m of soil and values vary based on surficial materials, ranging from 30 to 53 kg C/m**3, with a mean of 41 kg. Eighty per cent of the shoreline is erosive with a mean annual rate of change is 0.7 m/a. This results in a SOC flux per meter of shoreline of 131 kg C/m/a, and a total flux for the entire Yukon coast of 35.5 10**6 kg C/a (0.036 Tg C/a). The mean flux of sediment per meter of shoreline is 5.3 10**3 kg/m/a, with a total flux of 1,832.0 10**6 kg/a (1.832 Tg/a). Sedimentation rates indicate that approximately 13% of the eroded carbon is sequestered in nearshore sediments, where the overwhelming majority of organic carbon is of terrestrial origin. Supplement to: Couture, Nicole; Irrgang, Anna Maria; Pollard, Wayne H; Lantuit, Hugues; Fritz, Michael (2018): Coastal Erosion of Permafrost Soils Along the Yukon Coastal Plain and Fluxes of Organic Carbon to the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences

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5 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Research data . 2008
    English
    Authors: 
    Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Udry, J. Richard;
    Publisher: ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
    Project: NIH | Linkage Disequilibrium St... (5R01AA011330-07), NIH | University of Minnesota C... (8UL1TR000114-02), NIH | Carolina Population Cente... (3R24HD050924-05S1), AKA | MSDs@LIFECOURSE CONSORTIU... (129378), ARC | Quantitative and Molecula... (DP0212016), NIH | PROSTATE, LUNG, COLORECTA... (N01CN075022-018), NIH | PROSTATE, LUNG, COLORECTA... (N01CN025518-043), NIH | Genetic Risk to Stroke in... (5U01HG004436-02), NSF | Machine learning techniqu... (0823313), NIH | PROSTATE, LUNG, COLORECTA... (N01CN025404-013),...

    A Data Guide for this study is available as a web page and for download. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), 1994-2008 [Public Use] is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort was followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent conducted in 2008 when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Add Health Wave I data collection took place between September 1994 and December 1995, and included both an in-school questionnaire and in-home interview. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12, and gathered information on social and demographic characteristics of adolescent respondents, education and occupation of parents, household structure, expectations for the future, self-esteem, health status, risk behaviors, friendships, and school-year extracurricular activities. All students listed on a sample school's roster were eligible for selection into the core in-home interview sample. In-home interviews included topics such as health status, health-facility utilization, nutrition, peer networks, decision-making processes, family composition and dynamics, educational aspirations and expectations, employment experience, romantic and sexual partnerships, substance use, and criminal activities. A parent, preferably the resident mother, of each adolescent respondent interviewed in Wave I was also asked to complete an interviewer-assisted questionnaire covering topics such as inheritable health conditions, marriages and marriage-like relationships, neighborhood characteristics, involvement in volunteer, civic, and school activities, health-affecting behaviors, education and employment, household income and economic assistance, parent-adolescent communication and interaction, parent's familiarity with the adolescent's friends and friends' parents. Add Health data collection recommenced for Wave II from April to August 1996, and included almost 15,000 follow-up in-home interviews with adolescents from Wave I. Interview questions were generally similar to Wave I, but also included questions about sun exposure and more detailed nutrition questions. Respondents were asked to report their height and weight during the course of the interview, and were also weighed and measured by the interviewer. From August 2001 to April 2002, Wave III data were collected through in-home interviews with 15,170 Wave I respondents (now 18 to 26 years old), as well as interviews with their partners. Respondents were administered survey questions designed to obtain information about family, relationships, sexual experiences, childbearing, and educational histories, labor force involvement, civic participation, religion and spirituality, mental health, health insurance, illness, delinquency and violence, gambling, substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. High School Transcript Release Forms were also collected at Wave III, and these data comprise the Education Data component of the Add Health study. Wave IV in-home interviews were conducted in 2008 and 2009 when the original Wave I respondents were 24 to 32 years old. Longitudinal survey data were collected on the social, economic, psychological, and health circumstances of respondents, as well as longitudinal geographic data. Survey questions were expanded on educational transitions, economic status and financial resources and strains, sleep patterns and sleep quality, eating habits and nutrition, illnesses and medications, physical activities, emotional content and quality of current or most recent romantic/cohabiting/marriage relationships, and maltreatment during childhood by caregivers. Dates and circumstances of key life events occurring in young adulthood were also recorded, including a complete marriage and cohabitation history, full pregnancy and fertility histories from both men and women, an educational history of dates of degrees and school attendance, contact with the criminal justice system, military service, and various employment events, including the date of first and current jobs, with respective information on occupation, industry, wages, hours, and benefits. Finally, physical measurements and biospecimens were also collected at Wave IV, and included anthropometric measures of weight, height and waist circumference, cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse, metabolic measures from dried blood spots assayed for lipids, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), measures of inflammation and immune function, including High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Wave I: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS2: Wave I: Public Use Contextual Database DS3: Wave I: Network Variables DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS5: Wave II: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS6: Wave II: Public Use Contextual Database DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS8: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS9: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 17: Relationships) DS10: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancies) DS11: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Relationships in Detail) DS12: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 22: Completed Pregnancies) DS13: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 23: Current Pregnancies) DS14: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 24: Live Births) DS15: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 25: Children and Parenting) DS16: Wave III: Public Use Education Data DS17: Wave III: Public Use Graduation Data DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS20: Wave III: Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT), Public Use DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS22: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS23: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Relationships) DS24: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16C: Relationships) DS25: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancy Table) DS26: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Live Births) DS27: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 20A: Children and Parenting) DS28: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS29: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS30: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Lipids DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights Wave I: The Stage 1 in-school sample was a stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school -- a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade -- was also recruited from the community. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12. The Stage 2 in-home sample of 27,000 adolescents consisted of a core sample from each community, plus selected special over samples. Eligibility for over samples was determined by an adolescent's responses on the in-school questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample.; Wave II: The Wave II in-home interview surveyed almost 15,000 of the same students one year after Wave I.; Wave III: The in-home Wave III sample consists of over 15,000 Wave I respondents who could be located and re-interviewed six years later.; Wave IV: All original Wave I in-home respondents were eligible for in-home interviews at Wave IV. At Wave IV, the Add Health sample was dispersed across the nation with respondents living in all 50 states. Administrators were able to locate 92.5% of the Wave IV sample and interviewed 80.3% of eligible sample members. ; For additional information on sampling, including detailed information on special oversamples, please see the Add Health Study Design page. Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II focused on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study expanded and evolved. Wave III explored adolescent experiences and behaviors related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. Wave IV expanded to examine developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood, using an integrative study design which combined social, behavioral, and biomedical measures data collection. Response Rates: Response rates for each wave were as follows: Wave I: 79 percent; Wave II: 88.6 percent; Wave III: 77.4 percent; Wave IV: 80.3 percent; Adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. Respondents were geographically located in the United States. audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI) computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) computer-assisted self interview (CASI) paper and pencil interview (PAPI) face-to-face interview

  • English
    Authors: 
    Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Udry, J. Richard;
    Publisher: ICPSR - Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research
    Project: NIH | University of Minnesota C... (8UL1TR000114-02), NIH | Carolina Population Cente... (3R24HD050924-05S1), NIH | NATURAL HISTORY OF ALCOHO... (5R01AA007728-04), EC | GMI (230374), NIH | Intergenerational Researc... (5K07CA124905-02), NIH | Population Research Train... (5T32HD007168-39), NIH | Genetics of Opioid Depend... (5R01DA012690-15), NIH | Statistical Methods for G... (5R01CA133996-02), NIH | Consortium for Neuropsych... (8UL1DE019580-02), AKA | MSDs@LIFECOURSE CONSORTIU... (129378),...

    Downloads of Add Health require submission of the following information, which is shared with the original producer of Add Health: supervisor name, supervisor email, and reason for download. A Data Guide for this study is available as a web page and for download. The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), 1994-2018 [Public Use] is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. The Add Health cohort was followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent conducted in 2008 when the sample was aged 24-32. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological, and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships. Add Health Wave I data collection took place between September 1994 and December 1995, and included both an in-school questionnaire and in-home interview. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12, and gathered information on social and demographic characteristics of adolescent respondents, education and occupation of parents, household structure, expectations for the future, self-esteem, health status, risk behaviors, friendships, and school-year extracurricular activities. All students listed on a sample school's roster were eligible for selection into the core in-home interview sample. In-home interviews included topics such as health status, health-facility utilization, nutrition, peer networks, decision-making processes, family composition and dynamics, educational aspirations and expectations, employment experience, romantic and sexual partnerships, substance use, and criminal activities. A parent, preferably the resident mother, of each adolescent respondent interviewed in Wave I was also asked to complete an interviewer-assisted questionnaire covering topics such as inheritable health conditions, marriages and marriage-like relationships, neighborhood characteristics, involvement in volunteer, civic, and school activities, health-affecting behaviors, education and employment, household income and economic assistance, parent-adolescent communication and interaction, parent's familiarity with the adolescent's friends and friends' parents. Add Health data collection recommenced for Wave II from April to August 1996, and included almost 15,000 follow-up in-home interviews with adolescents from Wave I. Interview questions were generally similar to Wave I, but also included questions about sun exposure and more detailed nutrition questions. Respondents were asked to report their height and weight during the course of the interview, and were also weighed and measured by the interviewer. From August 2001 to April 2002, Wave III data were collected through in-home interviews with 15,170 Wave I respondents (now 18 to 26 years old), as well as interviews with their partners. Respondents were administered survey questions designed to obtain information about family, relationships, sexual experiences, childbearing, and educational histories, labor force involvement, civic participation, religion and spirituality, mental health, health insurance, illness, delinquency and violence, gambling, substance abuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. High School Transcript Release Forms were also collected at Wave III, and these data comprise the Education Data component of the Add Health study. Wave IV in-home interviews were conducted in 2008 and 2009 when the original Wave I respondents were 24 to 32 years old. Longitudinal survey data were collected on the social, economic, psychological, and health circumstances of respondents, as well as longitudinal geographic data. Survey questions were expanded on educational transitions, economic status and financial resources and strains, sleep patterns and sleep quality, eating habits and nutrition, illnesses and medications, physical activities, emotional content and quality of current or most recent romantic/cohabiting/marriage relationships, and maltreatment during childhood by caregivers. Dates and circumstances of key life events occurring in young adulthood were also recorded, including a complete marriage and cohabitation history, full pregnancy and fertility histories from both men and women, an educational history of dates of degrees and school attendance, contact with the criminal justice system, military service, and various employment events, including the date of first and current jobs, with respective information on occupation, industry, wages, hours, and benefits. Finally, physical measurements and biospecimens were also collected at Wave IV, and included anthropometric measures of weight, height and waist circumference, cardiovascular measures such as systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and pulse, metabolic measures from dried blood spots assayed for lipids, glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), measures of inflammation and immune function, including High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Wave V data collection took place from 2016 to 2018, when the original Wave I respondents were 33 to 43 years old. For the first time, a mixed mode survey design was used. In addition, several experiments were embedded in early phases of the data collection to test response to various treatments. A similar range of data was collected on social, environmental, economic, behavioral, and health circumstances of respondents, with the addition of retrospective child health and socio-economic status questions. Physical measurements and biospecimens were again collected at Wave V, and included most of the same measures as at Wave IV. Datasets: DS0: Study-Level Files DS1: Wave I: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS2: Wave I: Public Use Contextual Database DS3: Wave I: Network Variables DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS5: Wave II: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS6: Wave II: Public Use Contextual Database DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS8: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS9: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 17: Relationships) DS10: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancies) DS11: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Relationships in Detail) DS12: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 22: Completed Pregnancies) DS13: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 23: Current Pregnancies) DS14: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 24: Live Births) DS15: Wave III: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 25: Children and Parenting) DS16: Wave III: Public Use Education Data DS17: Wave III: Public Use Graduation Data DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS20: Wave III: Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT), Public Use DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS22: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample DS23: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Relationships) DS24: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 16C: Relationships) DS25: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 18: Pregnancy Table) DS26: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 19: Live Births) DS27: Wave IV: In-Home Questionnaire, Public Use Sample (Section 20A: Children and Parenting) DS28: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS29: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS30: Wave IV: Biomarkers, Lipids DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights DS32: Wave V: Mixed-Mode Survey, Public Use Sample DS33: Wave V: Mixed-Mode Survey, Public Use Sample (Section 16B: Pregnancy, Live Births, Children and Parenting) DS34: Wave V: Biomarkers, Anthropometrics DS35: Wave V: Biomarkers, Cardiovascular Measures DS36: Wave V: Biomarkers, Demographics DS37: Wave V: Biomarkers, Measures of Glucose Homeostasis DS38: Wave V: Biomarkers, Measures of Inflammation and Immune Function DS39: Wave V: Biomarkers, Lipids DS40: Wave V: Biomarkers, Medication Use DS41: Wave V: Biomarkers, Renal Function DS42: Wave V: Public Use Weights Wave I: The Stage 1 in-school sample was a stratified, random sample of all high schools in the United States. A school was eligible for the sample if it included an 11th grade and had a minimum enrollment of 30 students. A feeder school -- a school that sent graduates to the high school and that included a 7th grade -- was also recruited from the community. The in-school questionnaire was administered to more than 90,000 students in grades 7 through 12. The Stage 2 in-home sample of 27,000 adolescents consisted of a core sample from each community, plus selected special over samples. Eligibility for over samples was determined by an adolescent's responses on the in-school questionnaire. Adolescents could qualify for more than one sample. Wave II: The Wave II in-home interview surveyed almost 15,000 of the same students one year after Wave I. Wave III: The in-home Wave III sample consists of over 15,000 Wave I respondents who could be located and re-interviewed six years later. Wave IV: All original Wave I in-home respondents were eligible for in-home interviews at Wave IV. At Wave IV, the Add Health sample was dispersed across the nation with respondents living in all 50 states. Administrators were able to locate 92.5% of the Wave IV sample and interviewed 80.3% of eligible sample members. Wave V: All Wave I respondents who were still living were eligible at Wave V, yielding a pool of 19,828 persons. This pool was split into three stratified random samples for the purposes of survey design testing. For additional information on sampling, including detailed information on special oversamples, please see the Add Health Study Design page. audio computer-assisted self interview (ACASI); computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI); computer-assisted self interview (CASI); face-to-face interview; mixed mode; paper and pencil interview (PAPI); telephone interviewWave V data files were minimally processed by ICPSR. For value labeling, missing value designation, and question text (where applicable), please see the available P.I. Codebook/Questionnaires. The study-level documentation (Data Guide, User Guide) does not include Wave V datasets.Documentation for Waves prior to Wave V may use an older version of the study title.Users should be aware that version history notes dated prior to 2015-11-09 do not apply to the current organization of the datasets.Please note that dates present in the Summary and Time Period fields are taken from the Add Health Study Design page. The Date of Collection field represents the range of interview dates present in the data files for each wave.Wave I and Wave II field work was conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago.Wave III, Wave IV, and Wave V field work was conducted by the Research Triangle Institute.For the most updated list of related publications, please see the Add Health Publications Web site.Additional information on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) series can be found on the Add Health Web site. Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health. Waves I and II focused on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants aged into adulthood, the scientific goals of the study expanded and evolved. Wave III explored adolescent experiences and behaviors related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. Wave IV expanded to examine developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood, using an integrative study design which combined social, behavioral, and biomedical measures data collection. Wave V aimed to track the emergence of chronic disease as the cohort aged into their 30s and early 40s. Add health is a school-based longitudinal study of a nationally-representative sample of adolescents in grates 7-12 in the United States in 1945-45. Over more than 20 years of data collection, data have been collected from adolescents, their fellow students, school administrators, parents, siblings, friends, and romantic partners through multiple data collection components. In addition, existing databases with information about respondents' neighborhoods and communities have been merged with Add Health data, including variables on income poverty, unemployment, availability and utilization of health services, crime, church membership, and social programs and policies. The data files are not weighted. However, the collection features a number of weight variables contained within the following datasets: DS4: Wave I: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS7: Wave II: Public Use Grand Sample Weights DS18: Wave III: Public Use Education Data Weights DS19: Wave III: Add Health School Weights DS21: Wave III: Public In-Home Weights DS31: Wave IV: Public Use Weights DS42: Wave V: Public Use Weights Please note that these weights files do not apply to the Biomarker data files. For additional information on the application of weights for data analysis, please see the ICPSR User Guide, or the Guidelines for Analyzing Add Health Data. Response Rates: Response rates for each wave were as follows: Wave I: 79 percent Wave II: 88.6 percent Wave III: 77.4 percent Wave IV: 80.3 percent Wave V: 71.8 percent Adolescents in grades 7 through 12 during the 1994-1995 school year. Respondents were geographically located in the United States.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Nitze, Ingmar; Cooley, Sarah W; Duguay, Claude R; Jones, Benjamin M; Grosse, Guido;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NSERC , EC | PETA-CARB (338335)

    The data publication contains supplementary data to the article "Supplementary Dataset to: The catastrophic thermokarst lake drainage events of 2018 in northwestern Alaska: Fast-forward into the future" This data publication includes four datasets: 1. Lake change datasets for 1999-2014 and 2017-2018 based on Landsat and Sentinel-1 data as Polygon Shapefiles 2. Lake change datasets for 2017 and 2018 based on high-temporal resolution PlanetScope imagery as Polygon Shapefiles and csv. 3. Lake ice simulations for the study area for 1980-2018. 4. Study sites in two versions: a) including seawater and b) clipped to land area. Files are Polygon Shapefiles. The datasets cover the land area of the Baldwin Peninsula and northern Seward Peninsula in north-western Alaska. The datasets are (#1) remote sensing based observations and (#3) modelled data. Methods are described in detail in the original manuscript (open access). Dataset #4 is the extent of the study site in two versions, a) full extent including seawater and b) land only including lakes. The land boundary was clipped with the “Global Self-consistent, Hierarchical, High-resolution Geography Database” (GSHHG; Wessel and Smith, 1996) dataset in scale “h”. The datasets cover different temporal periods and have a different temporal resolution. Data were collected to measure the extent of a rapid and widespread thermokarst lake drainage event in northwestern Alaska in 2018 and to compare the affected number of lakes and area to previous periods. Lake-ice model data were calculated to simulate lake-ice conditions since 1980 and to put the lake-ice and weather conditions in 2017/2018 into context.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Voigt, Carolina; van Delden, Lona; Marushchak, Maija E; Biasi, Christina; Abbott, Benjamin W; Elberling, Bo; Siciliano, Steven D; Sonnentag, Oliver; Stewart, Katherine J; Yang, Yuanhe; +1 more
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NSERC , AKA | Mechanisms underlying lar... (132045), AKA | Short and long term effec... (307222), UKRI | Methane and other greenho... (NE/I029293/1), AKA | Long term effects of fire... (286685), AKA | Short and long term effec... (294600), EC | PAGE21 (282700), AKA | Towards constraining the ... (314630)

    If not reported, water-filled pore space (WFPS) was calculated as follows: WFPS (%) = VWC/(1-BD/PD)*100, where VWC is the volumetric water content, BD is the bulk density, and PD is the particle density. If BD was not reported, BD was estimated from the SOM content using functions developed for Arctic soils (Hossain et al, 2015) as follows: 0.075+1.301*EXP(-0.06*SOM) for mineral soils, and 0.043*0+4.258*EXP(-0.047*SOM) for organic soils. If not reported, SOM via loss on ignition was derived from the soil carbon content as follows: SOM (%) = C content*2. If the resulting SOM value was >100%, SOM (%) = C content*1.724. PD can be derived as follows (Okruszko, 1971): PD = 0.011*(100-SOM)+1.451 (see references Okruszko, 1971 and Hossain et al, 2015). The term ”topsoil” depends on the exact depths the soil characteristics are reported in the individual publications, but generally the soil layer of 0–10cm was used. Column ”SOC” includes mostly total soil C content (reported in the majority of studies), and on some occasions total organic C. This dataset is a synthesis of published nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes from permafrost-affected soils in Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine permafrost regions. The data includes mean N2O flux rates measured under field (in situ) conditions and in intact plant-soil systems (mesocosms) under near-field conditions. The dataset further includes explanatory environmental parameters such as meteorological data, soil physical-chemical properties, as well as site and experimental information. Data has been synthesized from published studies (see 'Further details'), and in some cases the authors of published studies have been contacted for additional site-level information. The dataset includes studies published until 2019. We encourage linking additional N2O flux data from unpublished and future studies with similar metadata structure to this dataset, to produce a comprehensive, findable database for N2O fluxes from permafrost regions.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Couture, Nicole; Irrgang, Anna Maria; Pollard, Wayne H; Lantuit, Hugues; Fritz, Michael;
    Publisher: PANGAEA
    Project: NSERC , EC | Nunataryuk (773421)

    Narrowing uncertainties about carbon cycling is important in the Arctic where rapid environmental changes contribute to enhanced mobilization of carbon. Here we quantify soil organic carbon (SOC) contents of permafrost soils along the Yukon Coastal Plain and determine the annual fluxes from erosion. Different terrain units are assessed based on surficial geology, morphology, and ground ice conditions. To account for the volume of wedge ice and massive ice in a unit, sample SOC contents are reduced by 19% and sediment contents by 16%. The SOC content in a 1 m**2 column of soil varies according to the height of the bluff, ranging from 30 to 662 kg, with a mean value of 183 kg. Forty-four per cent of the SOC is within the top 1 m of soil and values vary based on surficial materials, ranging from 30 to 53 kg C/m**3, with a mean of 41 kg. Eighty per cent of the shoreline is erosive with a mean annual rate of change is 0.7 m/a. This results in a SOC flux per meter of shoreline of 131 kg C/m/a, and a total flux for the entire Yukon coast of 35.5 10**6 kg C/a (0.036 Tg C/a). The mean flux of sediment per meter of shoreline is 5.3 10**3 kg/m/a, with a total flux of 1,832.0 10**6 kg/a (1.832 Tg/a). Sedimentation rates indicate that approximately 13% of the eroded carbon is sequestered in nearshore sediments, where the overwhelming majority of organic carbon is of terrestrial origin. Supplement to: Couture, Nicole; Irrgang, Anna Maria; Pollard, Wayne H; Lantuit, Hugues; Fritz, Michael (2018): Coastal Erosion of Permafrost Soils Along the Yukon Coastal Plain and Fluxes of Organic Carbon to the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Journal of Geophysical Research: Biogeosciences