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2,574 Research products, page 1 of 258

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  • Research data
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  • Canadian Institutes of Health Research

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  • Research data . 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mazo, Alexander;
    Project: CIHR

    Original images associated with MOLECULAR-CELL-D-16-01448R2.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mehdi, Ali; Cheishvili, David; Arakelian, Ani; Bismar, Tarek A.; Szyf, Moshe; Rabbani, Shafaat A.;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Supplementary Table 2. List of the primers used for pyrosequencing and amplicon sequencing (Illumina MiSeq system).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Schatte, G.; Labiuk, S.; Li, B.; Burnett, P.-G.; Reaney, M.; Grochulski, P.; Fodje, M.; Yang, J.; Sammynaiken, R.;
    Publisher: Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre
    Project: CIHR , NSERC

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures. Related Article: G.Schatte, S.Labiuk, B.Li, P.-G.Burnett, M.Reaney, P.Grochulski, M.Fodje, J.Yang, R.Sammynaiken|2012|Acta Crystallogr.,Sect.E:Struct.Rep.Online|68|o50|doi:10.1107/S1600536811051488

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Guanxiang Liang; Nilusha Malmuthuge; Bao, Hua; Stothard, Paul; Griebel, Philip; Guan, Le;
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR , NSERC

    Regionally DE genes list. (XLSX 282Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Liu, Chengyou; Hogan, Andrew M.; Sturm, Hunter; Khan, Mohd Wasif; Islam, Md. Mohaiminul; Rahman, A. S. M. Zisanur; Davis, Rebecca; Cardona, Silvia T.; Hu, Pingzhao;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Table S2. Annotation of the M. Tuberculosis genes and clusters. M. tuberculosis genes are represented by gene symbols and the protein RefSeq ID and COG category eggNOG.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Gillis, Doris E.;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: CIHR

    At a time when health literacy is emerging as a central concern in the health field, this thesis examines whether and how practitioners involved in the promotion of breastfeeding incorporate dimensions of health literacy as described in the current literature. Although there is little evidence that practitioners are familiar with specific definitions of health literacy, their description of practices reflected various facets of health literacy including functional health literacy, interactive and critical health literacy, and health literacy as composed of multiple literacies. This qualitative case study was set in a rural health district in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia where breastfeeding initiation and duration rates are lower than national averages and where health literacy was identified as a community health issue. In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 30 professional and lay practitioners. Practices in one hospital-based and two community-based settings were observed. Data were analyzed for themes using an iterative process of constant comparison. Interview informants and mothers provided feedback on preliminary findings in focus group interviews. Findings reflect an emphasis on the transmission of information to persuade mothers to breastfeed, in contrast to strengthening their capacity to use information in making or acting on choices about how to feed their babies. Practitioners’ discomfort in identifying clients with low literacy skills raises fundamental concerns about the stigma associated with low literacy. A focus on the functional health literacy deficiencies of clients, not on their capacities, appears limiting in addressing the complexities of breastfeeding promotion. There is little evidence of practices which reflect critical health literacy or efforts to reduce structural barriers to breastfeeding. In conclusion, the study suggests that practitioners’ engagement in critical reflection of their breastfeeding promotion practices through the multidimensional frame of health literacy could help to further their practice and the conceptual development of health literacy.

  • Authors: 
    Ailenberg, Menachem; Kapus, Andras; Rotstein, Ori D;
    Publisher: Future Science Group
    Project: CIHR

    Efficiency of D-B primers in detecting SARS-COV-2 virus in nasopharyngeal swabs. cDNA of reverse-transcribed RNA extracted from nasopharyngeal swabs of patient S1 underwent 3 decimal dilutions and subjected to qPCR with SYBR green kit+ UDG and D-B primer mix #8. (A) amplification plot and insert efficiency plot of Ct vs log dilution. Slope= -3.2942 representing 101.27% amplification efficiency and R2= 0.9934. (B) melt curve of the amplicons depicted in panel A. Ct dilution values: 100- 25.55, 10-1- 28.38, 10-2- 32.14, NTC- 39.48. qPCR was performed under standard conditions.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hyshka, Elaine; Jalene Anderson-Baron; Kamagaju Karekezi; Belle-Isle, Lynne; Elliott, Richard; Pauly, Bernie; Strike, Carol; Asbridge, Mark; Dell, Colleen; McBride, Keely; +2 more
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Provincial and territorial policy documents and indicator scores; table contains all CHARPP indicator scores from 13 provincial and territorial harm reduction policy report cards. (XLSX 57Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Haile, Simon; Corbett, Richard; MacLeod, Tina; Bilobram, Steve; Smailus, Duane; Tsao, Philip; Kirk, Heather; McDonald, Helen; Pandoh, Pawan; Bala, Miruna; +11 more
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Library construction chemistry comparison using tumor samples. Two NEB workflows were evaluated. The first has bead clean up after each of the library construction steps (A); the second has the bead cleanup after A-tail removed (B). Input gDNA was from three different clinical samples (Source 1â 3). (JPEG 27Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Liu, Feng; Cai, Ping; Imir Metushi; Jinze Li; Nakayawa, Tetsuya; Libia Vega; Uetrecht, Jack;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: CIHR

    Amodiaquine (AQ) is associated with a relatively high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. A previous study reported that a combination of high dose AQ and glutathione (GSH) depletion led to liver injury. However, the characteristics of this toxicity were very different from AQ-induced liver injury in humans. We developed a model of AQ-induced liver injury with characteristics similar to the injury in humans by treating mice with lower doses of AQ for several weeks. In this study we found that not only did GSH depletion not increase AQ covalent binding to hepatic proteins at this lower dose, but also it paradoxically prevented the liver injury. We extended the model to rats and found AQ treatment led to a mild delayed onset liver injury that resolved despite continued treatment with AQ. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of Kupffer cell activation, apoptosis and hepatocyte proliferation in the liver. There was also an increase in serum IL-2, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, MCP-1 and TGFβ, but a decrease in leptin. Coincident with the elevated serum ALT, the number of liver CD4+ T-cells, IL-17 secreting cells and TH17/Treg cells increased at Week 3 and decreased during continued treatment. Increases in NK1.1+ cells and activated M2 macrophages were also observed during liver injury. These results suggest that the outcome of the liver injury was determined by the balance between effector and regulatory cells. Co-treatment with cyclosporin prevented AQ-induced liver injury, which supports an immune mechanism. Retinoic acid (RA), which has been reported to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity, exacerbated AQ-induced liver injury. These results suggest that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated and the subsequent adaptation appears to represent immune tolerance.

Advanced search in
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arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
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arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,574 Research products, page 1 of 258
  • Research data . 2017
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mazo, Alexander;
    Project: CIHR

    Original images associated with MOLECULAR-CELL-D-16-01448R2.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mehdi, Ali; Cheishvili, David; Arakelian, Ani; Bismar, Tarek A.; Szyf, Moshe; Rabbani, Shafaat A.;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Supplementary Table 2. List of the primers used for pyrosequencing and amplicon sequencing (Illumina MiSeq system).

  • English
    Authors: 
    Schatte, G.; Labiuk, S.; Li, B.; Burnett, P.-G.; Reaney, M.; Grochulski, P.; Fodje, M.; Yang, J.; Sammynaiken, R.;
    Publisher: Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre
    Project: CIHR , NSERC

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures. Related Article: G.Schatte, S.Labiuk, B.Li, P.-G.Burnett, M.Reaney, P.Grochulski, M.Fodje, J.Yang, R.Sammynaiken|2012|Acta Crystallogr.,Sect.E:Struct.Rep.Online|68|o50|doi:10.1107/S1600536811051488

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Guanxiang Liang; Nilusha Malmuthuge; Bao, Hua; Stothard, Paul; Griebel, Philip; Guan, Le;
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR , NSERC

    Regionally DE genes list. (XLSX 282Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Liu, Chengyou; Hogan, Andrew M.; Sturm, Hunter; Khan, Mohd Wasif; Islam, Md. Mohaiminul; Rahman, A. S. M. Zisanur; Davis, Rebecca; Cardona, Silvia T.; Hu, Pingzhao;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Table S2. Annotation of the M. Tuberculosis genes and clusters. M. tuberculosis genes are represented by gene symbols and the protein RefSeq ID and COG category eggNOG.

  • English
    Authors: 
    Gillis, Doris E.;
    Country: United Kingdom
    Project: CIHR

    At a time when health literacy is emerging as a central concern in the health field, this thesis examines whether and how practitioners involved in the promotion of breastfeeding incorporate dimensions of health literacy as described in the current literature. Although there is little evidence that practitioners are familiar with specific definitions of health literacy, their description of practices reflected various facets of health literacy including functional health literacy, interactive and critical health literacy, and health literacy as composed of multiple literacies. This qualitative case study was set in a rural health district in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia where breastfeeding initiation and duration rates are lower than national averages and where health literacy was identified as a community health issue. In-depth face-to-face interviews were conducted with 30 professional and lay practitioners. Practices in one hospital-based and two community-based settings were observed. Data were analyzed for themes using an iterative process of constant comparison. Interview informants and mothers provided feedback on preliminary findings in focus group interviews. Findings reflect an emphasis on the transmission of information to persuade mothers to breastfeed, in contrast to strengthening their capacity to use information in making or acting on choices about how to feed their babies. Practitioners’ discomfort in identifying clients with low literacy skills raises fundamental concerns about the stigma associated with low literacy. A focus on the functional health literacy deficiencies of clients, not on their capacities, appears limiting in addressing the complexities of breastfeeding promotion. There is little evidence of practices which reflect critical health literacy or efforts to reduce structural barriers to breastfeeding. In conclusion, the study suggests that practitioners’ engagement in critical reflection of their breastfeeding promotion practices through the multidimensional frame of health literacy could help to further their practice and the conceptual development of health literacy.

  • Authors: 
    Ailenberg, Menachem; Kapus, Andras; Rotstein, Ori D;
    Publisher: Future Science Group
    Project: CIHR

    Efficiency of D-B primers in detecting SARS-COV-2 virus in nasopharyngeal swabs. cDNA of reverse-transcribed RNA extracted from nasopharyngeal swabs of patient S1 underwent 3 decimal dilutions and subjected to qPCR with SYBR green kit+ UDG and D-B primer mix #8. (A) amplification plot and insert efficiency plot of Ct vs log dilution. Slope= -3.2942 representing 101.27% amplification efficiency and R2= 0.9934. (B) melt curve of the amplicons depicted in panel A. Ct dilution values: 100- 25.55, 10-1- 28.38, 10-2- 32.14, NTC- 39.48. qPCR was performed under standard conditions.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hyshka, Elaine; Jalene Anderson-Baron; Kamagaju Karekezi; Belle-Isle, Lynne; Elliott, Richard; Pauly, Bernie; Strike, Carol; Asbridge, Mark; Dell, Colleen; McBride, Keely; +2 more
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Provincial and territorial policy documents and indicator scores; table contains all CHARPP indicator scores from 13 provincial and territorial harm reduction policy report cards. (XLSX 57Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Haile, Simon; Corbett, Richard; MacLeod, Tina; Bilobram, Steve; Smailus, Duane; Tsao, Philip; Kirk, Heather; McDonald, Helen; Pandoh, Pawan; Bala, Miruna; +11 more
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Library construction chemistry comparison using tumor samples. Two NEB workflows were evaluated. The first has bead clean up after each of the library construction steps (A); the second has the bead cleanup after A-tail removed (B). Input gDNA was from three different clinical samples (Source 1â 3). (JPEG 27Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Liu, Feng; Cai, Ping; Imir Metushi; Jinze Li; Nakayawa, Tetsuya; Libia Vega; Uetrecht, Jack;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: CIHR

    Amodiaquine (AQ) is associated with a relatively high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. A previous study reported that a combination of high dose AQ and glutathione (GSH) depletion led to liver injury. However, the characteristics of this toxicity were very different from AQ-induced liver injury in humans. We developed a model of AQ-induced liver injury with characteristics similar to the injury in humans by treating mice with lower doses of AQ for several weeks. In this study we found that not only did GSH depletion not increase AQ covalent binding to hepatic proteins at this lower dose, but also it paradoxically prevented the liver injury. We extended the model to rats and found AQ treatment led to a mild delayed onset liver injury that resolved despite continued treatment with AQ. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of Kupffer cell activation, apoptosis and hepatocyte proliferation in the liver. There was also an increase in serum IL-2, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, MCP-1 and TGFβ, but a decrease in leptin. Coincident with the elevated serum ALT, the number of liver CD4+ T-cells, IL-17 secreting cells and TH17/Treg cells increased at Week 3 and decreased during continued treatment. Increases in NK1.1+ cells and activated M2 macrophages were also observed during liver injury. These results suggest that the outcome of the liver injury was determined by the balance between effector and regulatory cells. Co-treatment with cyclosporin prevented AQ-induced liver injury, which supports an immune mechanism. Retinoic acid (RA), which has been reported to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity, exacerbated AQ-induced liver injury. These results suggest that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated and the subsequent adaptation appears to represent immune tolerance.