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327 Research products, page 1 of 33

  • Canada
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • COVID-19

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  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Agarwal, Gina; AlShenaiber, Leena;
    Country: Canada

    [English] CP@clinic has responded and adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic. The program has specific components to facilitate virtual program implementation, which are supported by a SMART database. [Français] PC@clinique répond et s'adapte à la pandémie de COVID-19. Le programme comprend des composants spécifiques pour faciliter la mise en oeuvre du programme virtuel, qui sont soutenus par une base de données INTELLIGENTE.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina;
    Publisher: University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina
    Country: Canada

    When Dr. Harold Riemer, Professor and Dean with the Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies (KHS), was looking at what the upcoming semesters in KHS would look like, he knew that he wanted to find a way to offer a classroom experience to students, while adhering to all COVID-19 restrictions. The faculty worked together and came up with creative solutions to have small, in-person classes in addition to an extensive amount of remote courses. Staff no

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Justin Draper;
    Country: Canada

    In January of 2022, the self entitled #UnitedWeRoll convoy arrived in Ottawa and other locations around Canada to demonstrate against COVID-19 health measures and protest governments in Canada. While the group originated online, the in-person demonstrators commenced a month-long occupation that impacted international trade, community safety and brought the still raging conversation about COVID-19 even more to the forefront of Canadian society. With online communities being an influential venue for political discussion, it is important to understand the role of social media platforms and how social media content creators contribute to social and political movements on and offline. In this research, I analyze social media content produced by members of the far right on TikTok using the 2022 Canadian anti COVID-19 mandate demonstrations as a case study in order to gain insight into how far right movements in Canada grow and recruit new members to their networks.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Romund, Grace; Fuhr, Justin; Speare, Marie; Albrecht, Vickie; Babb, Maureen; Schultz, Ryan;
    Publisher: American Libraries Association Conference (ALA ’21)
    Country: Canada

    The University of Manitoba’s science librarians developed a three-credit, second-year course entitled “Information Skills for the Sciences” that was delivered for the first time in the fall of 2020. The culminating project of the course was a scientific poster session where students shared their research project as a poster presentation with their instructors and classmates. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the course was moved to online synchronous delivery and all assignments needed to be adapted for the online format. We designed a virtual poster session simulating an in-person event, hosting the poster session on Zoom for a class of twenty students using breakout rooms to separate presentations. Our poster details the methods used to deliver an online in-class poster session in an undergraduate setting with visualizations to illustrate the experience. Despite the conditions of remote learning, the poster presentation session allowed students to engage meaningfully with the research of their classmates demonstrating that an exciting end-of-semester event like an in-person poster session was possible in an online environment. We discuss the challenges we encountered creating the poster session as well as our reflections on what worked and what might be improved in the future.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roussel, Jean-François;
    Country: Canada

    La pandemia en el contexto de una crisis cultural ¿que reto teológico?. Panel"Theology and the global crisis caused by COVID-19": Forum mondial théologie et libération. Evénement sur Zoom, Montréal, Canada

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vitt, Kathleen;
    Country: Canada

    Despite ongoing relationship building efforts at the community level, Indigenous and immigrant and refugee newcomer communities in Canada continue to experience a fractured relationship characterized by misperceptions, misunderstandings and tension. One of the predominant reasons for this ongoing fractured relationship is the lack of community-driven, decolonial information that each community receives about the other. This project sought to respond to this reality, by exploring the experience of an online relationship building Talking Circle and video-making process, where Indigenous and newcomer youth reflected on their identities as newcomer or Indigenous peoples and the possibilities for transformed relationships between both communities. The video that was created then went on to be shared with Indigenous and newcomer serving organizations within Winnipeg and was posted free online, becoming a potential community-driven, decolonial relationship building resource for community members to access. This project was guided by an Indigenous research paradigm, as well as the visiting way, storytelling and arts-based methodologies. Overall, this project found an imbalance in perceptions between both communities, alongside relationship building possibilities within increasing opportunities for community-driven, decolonial information to be transferred, shared minority experiences and cultural strengths, and the need for both formal and informal relationship building opportunities. Several key implications for social work practice are discussed and recommendations for bridging relations between Indigenous and newcomer communities are proposed.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Waechtler, Heidi;
    Country: Canada

    This report documents my experience of teaching PUB 800 – Text and Context: Publishing in Contemporary Culture at SFU Publishing in the Fall 2020 semester, which was both my first time teaching this course and the first time it had been delivered remotely, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. It details the work of designing a publishing theory seminar as a non-academic, industry professional, and examines how a course that originated as a primer in Canadian publishing policy has evolved into a seminar course that more broadly interrogates the structure, state, and culture of contemporary publishing. The report reflects on the challenges of structuring the course to adequately cover the necessary material in twelve weeks, and on the limitations of using Canadian book publishing as the course’s primary case study. It also looks at the adaptations made to the course structure and delivery in light of the pandemic.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dicen, Miguel Antonio;
    Country: Canada

    Canada is a diverse country with 22.3% of Canadians belonging to visible minorities (Wang & Moreau, 2022). Canada’s history has been marked by systemic racism against visible minorities such as Indigenous, Black, and Asian communities. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, brought racism into stark relief with an increase in the number of hate crimes and hate incidents across Canada. This study examines the reasons behind the prevalence of hate crimes and hate incidents against visible minorities in the province of British Columbia. The study aims to better understand the experiences of racism in the province of British Columbia through focus group discussions involving members of the racialized communities, and also by drawing on evidence derived from secondary sources to understand the reasons behind the issue. Interviews were conducted with key informants belonging to various organizations involved in efforts to combat racism to determine potential gaps in current policies and government initiatives. The compilation and analysis of the data obtained in the study identified several key factors that contribute to the problem of hate crimes and hate incidents. Four policy options comprised of short to long term solutions have been proposed to address the issue of hate crimes and hate incidents.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Shannon Fraser;
    Country: Canada

    The Covid-19 pandemic has had various effects on social, economic, and political aspects of our world. Specifically in the realm of education, teachers have been left to navigate the uncharted territory of teaching exclusively online in the first phase of the virus, beginning in March 2020, then intermittently teaching online during the 2020-2021 school year, then dealing with the impact of Covid-19 on absenteeism, student apathy, and disengagement during the 2021-2022 school year. The impact on teachers’ overall mental health and well-being was vast, and subsequent feelings of grief and burnout were experienced by many. In this qualitative study, based on grounded theory methodology, a small purposeful sampling of teachers volunteered to share their experiences of teaching in the pandemic, and to what extent they experienced the stages of grief (Kübler-Ross, 1969) and indicators of burnout (Nagoski & Nagoski, 2019). Six participants were interviewed, data collected, transcribed, analyzed, and coded to identify themes. Teaching experience varied among participants, but many similarities existed. The final part of the research and questioning centered around supports administration and leadership, both divisional and local, could offer to mitigate some of the symptoms of grief and burnout being experienced. Despite the variance in experience with grief and burnout, each participant identified with the frameworks presented, while continuing to hope for a better future for their teaching experience and in the greater world of education.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina;
    Publisher: University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina
    Country: Canada

    Strength, resilience, adaptability, and compassion - these are the building blocks of the Regina COVID-19 Volunteer Community Response Team, a community support network initiated by Dr. JoLee Sasakamoose, Associate Professor in Educational Psychology and Counselling at the University of Regina. Since a state of emergency was announced by the Government of Saskatchewan in March 2020, the Regina COVID Response team of five core members and numerous volunteers has been working day and night to support Elders and other vulnerable Indigenous people in Regina, who do not have a network of family or caregivers. Staff no

Advanced search in
Research products
arrow_drop_down
Searching FieldsTerms
Any field
arrow_drop_down
includes
arrow_drop_down
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
327 Research products, page 1 of 33
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Agarwal, Gina; AlShenaiber, Leena;
    Country: Canada

    [English] CP@clinic has responded and adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic. The program has specific components to facilitate virtual program implementation, which are supported by a SMART database. [Français] PC@clinique répond et s'adapte à la pandémie de COVID-19. Le programme comprend des composants spécifiques pour faciliter la mise en oeuvre du programme virtuel, qui sont soutenus par une base de données INTELLIGENTE.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina;
    Publisher: University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina
    Country: Canada

    When Dr. Harold Riemer, Professor and Dean with the Faculty of Kinesiology and Health Studies (KHS), was looking at what the upcoming semesters in KHS would look like, he knew that he wanted to find a way to offer a classroom experience to students, while adhering to all COVID-19 restrictions. The faculty worked together and came up with creative solutions to have small, in-person classes in addition to an extensive amount of remote courses. Staff no

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Justin Draper;
    Country: Canada

    In January of 2022, the self entitled #UnitedWeRoll convoy arrived in Ottawa and other locations around Canada to demonstrate against COVID-19 health measures and protest governments in Canada. While the group originated online, the in-person demonstrators commenced a month-long occupation that impacted international trade, community safety and brought the still raging conversation about COVID-19 even more to the forefront of Canadian society. With online communities being an influential venue for political discussion, it is important to understand the role of social media platforms and how social media content creators contribute to social and political movements on and offline. In this research, I analyze social media content produced by members of the far right on TikTok using the 2022 Canadian anti COVID-19 mandate demonstrations as a case study in order to gain insight into how far right movements in Canada grow and recruit new members to their networks.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Romund, Grace; Fuhr, Justin; Speare, Marie; Albrecht, Vickie; Babb, Maureen; Schultz, Ryan;
    Publisher: American Libraries Association Conference (ALA ’21)
    Country: Canada

    The University of Manitoba’s science librarians developed a three-credit, second-year course entitled “Information Skills for the Sciences” that was delivered for the first time in the fall of 2020. The culminating project of the course was a scientific poster session where students shared their research project as a poster presentation with their instructors and classmates. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the course was moved to online synchronous delivery and all assignments needed to be adapted for the online format. We designed a virtual poster session simulating an in-person event, hosting the poster session on Zoom for a class of twenty students using breakout rooms to separate presentations. Our poster details the methods used to deliver an online in-class poster session in an undergraduate setting with visualizations to illustrate the experience. Despite the conditions of remote learning, the poster presentation session allowed students to engage meaningfully with the research of their classmates demonstrating that an exciting end-of-semester event like an in-person poster session was possible in an online environment. We discuss the challenges we encountered creating the poster session as well as our reflections on what worked and what might be improved in the future.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Roussel, Jean-François;
    Country: Canada

    La pandemia en el contexto de una crisis cultural ¿que reto teológico?. Panel"Theology and the global crisis caused by COVID-19": Forum mondial théologie et libération. Evénement sur Zoom, Montréal, Canada

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vitt, Kathleen;
    Country: Canada

    Despite ongoing relationship building efforts at the community level, Indigenous and immigrant and refugee newcomer communities in Canada continue to experience a fractured relationship characterized by misperceptions, misunderstandings and tension. One of the predominant reasons for this ongoing fractured relationship is the lack of community-driven, decolonial information that each community receives about the other. This project sought to respond to this reality, by exploring the experience of an online relationship building Talking Circle and video-making process, where Indigenous and newcomer youth reflected on their identities as newcomer or Indigenous peoples and the possibilities for transformed relationships between both communities. The video that was created then went on to be shared with Indigenous and newcomer serving organizations within Winnipeg and was posted free online, becoming a potential community-driven, decolonial relationship building resource for community members to access. This project was guided by an Indigenous research paradigm, as well as the visiting way, storytelling and arts-based methodologies. Overall, this project found an imbalance in perceptions between both communities, alongside relationship building possibilities within increasing opportunities for community-driven, decolonial information to be transferred, shared minority experiences and cultural strengths, and the need for both formal and informal relationship building opportunities. Several key implications for social work practice are discussed and recommendations for bridging relations between Indigenous and newcomer communities are proposed.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Waechtler, Heidi;
    Country: Canada

    This report documents my experience of teaching PUB 800 – Text and Context: Publishing in Contemporary Culture at SFU Publishing in the Fall 2020 semester, which was both my first time teaching this course and the first time it had been delivered remotely, owing to the COVID-19 pandemic. It details the work of designing a publishing theory seminar as a non-academic, industry professional, and examines how a course that originated as a primer in Canadian publishing policy has evolved into a seminar course that more broadly interrogates the structure, state, and culture of contemporary publishing. The report reflects on the challenges of structuring the course to adequately cover the necessary material in twelve weeks, and on the limitations of using Canadian book publishing as the course’s primary case study. It also looks at the adaptations made to the course structure and delivery in light of the pandemic.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Dicen, Miguel Antonio;
    Country: Canada

    Canada is a diverse country with 22.3% of Canadians belonging to visible minorities (Wang & Moreau, 2022). Canada’s history has been marked by systemic racism against visible minorities such as Indigenous, Black, and Asian communities. The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, however, brought racism into stark relief with an increase in the number of hate crimes and hate incidents across Canada. This study examines the reasons behind the prevalence of hate crimes and hate incidents against visible minorities in the province of British Columbia. The study aims to better understand the experiences of racism in the province of British Columbia through focus group discussions involving members of the racialized communities, and also by drawing on evidence derived from secondary sources to understand the reasons behind the issue. Interviews were conducted with key informants belonging to various organizations involved in efforts to combat racism to determine potential gaps in current policies and government initiatives. The compilation and analysis of the data obtained in the study identified several key factors that contribute to the problem of hate crimes and hate incidents. Four policy options comprised of short to long term solutions have been proposed to address the issue of hate crimes and hate incidents.

  • Other research product . 2022
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Shannon Fraser;
    Country: Canada

    The Covid-19 pandemic has had various effects on social, economic, and political aspects of our world. Specifically in the realm of education, teachers have been left to navigate the uncharted territory of teaching exclusively online in the first phase of the virus, beginning in March 2020, then intermittently teaching online during the 2020-2021 school year, then dealing with the impact of Covid-19 on absenteeism, student apathy, and disengagement during the 2021-2022 school year. The impact on teachers’ overall mental health and well-being was vast, and subsequent feelings of grief and burnout were experienced by many. In this qualitative study, based on grounded theory methodology, a small purposeful sampling of teachers volunteered to share their experiences of teaching in the pandemic, and to what extent they experienced the stages of grief (Kübler-Ross, 1969) and indicators of burnout (Nagoski & Nagoski, 2019). Six participants were interviewed, data collected, transcribed, analyzed, and coded to identify themes. Teaching experience varied among participants, but many similarities existed. The final part of the research and questioning centered around supports administration and leadership, both divisional and local, could offer to mitigate some of the symptoms of grief and burnout being experienced. Despite the variance in experience with grief and burnout, each participant identified with the frameworks presented, while continuing to hope for a better future for their teaching experience and in the greater world of education.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina;
    Publisher: University Advancement & Communications, University of Regina
    Country: Canada

    Strength, resilience, adaptability, and compassion - these are the building blocks of the Regina COVID-19 Volunteer Community Response Team, a community support network initiated by Dr. JoLee Sasakamoose, Associate Professor in Educational Psychology and Counselling at the University of Regina. Since a state of emergency was announced by the Government of Saskatchewan in March 2020, the Regina COVID Response team of five core members and numerous volunteers has been working day and night to support Elders and other vulnerable Indigenous people in Regina, who do not have a network of family or caregivers. Staff no