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The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
10 Projects, page 1 of 1

  • Canada
  • 2015
  • 2020

  • Funder: EC Project Code: 115766
    Partners: Bayer AG, The Structural Genomics Consortium, ETH Zurich, UOXF, PFIZER, NOVARTIS, Janssen (Belgium), Bayer Pharma AG, KI, DRX...
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 2R01DA028648-06
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-09
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5U01DA038886-05
    Funder Contribution: 973,265 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 3U01DA038886-05S1
    Funder Contribution: 294,957 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/M013693/1
    Funder Contribution: 272,801 GBP
    Partners: LANL, ECMWF, SFU, University of Reading, Met Office

    This project is about using moving meshes - r-adaptivity - to improve the predictive power of atmospheric flow simulations, which are used in the fields of numerical weather prediction and climate modelling. When the atmosphere is simulated on a computer, this is done by dividing the sphere into cells which are arranged in a mesh. There is a conflict between the need for accuracy, which requires smaller (and hence more) cells, and computational efficiency, which increases with the number of cells. A reasonable question to ask is: for a given amount of accuracy, what size of cells do I need? The answer can be provided mathematically, but it depends on what is actually happening in the atmosphere simulation. Much smaller cells are required in the regions of smaller scale features such as atmospheric fronts, cyclones, jets, convective cells etc. It then seems like a waste to choose the same cell size all over the globe even in regions where these features are absent. An attractive idea is to try to stretch, deform and move the mesh around so that smaller cells are used in the regions of small scale features, and larger cells are used elsewhere. This would mean that a better compromise can be made between accuracy and computational efficiency, thus improving predictive power for the same resource. This idea has been used successfully in many engineering applications, and the goal of this project is to transmit this technology to atmosphere simulation, where it can be used by meteorologists and climate scientists to take their science forward. There are, however, a number of challenging aspects. Efficient mesh movement algorithms have not previously been developed for the sphere geometry which is needed for global atmosphere simulations. There is the question of how to detect where the mesh should be moved to. It is also the case that it is very challenging to design stable and accurate numerical algorithms for simulating the atmosphere, and these must be adapted to remain stable and accurate under mesh movement. All of these questions and issues will be addressed in this project.

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-08
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 639363
    Overall Budget: 1,416,150 EURFunder Contribution: 1,416,150 EUR
    Partners: University of Vienna, UALBERTA, INFORM

    The project will examine the histories of yoga, ayurveda and rasashastra (Indian alchemy and iatrochemistry) from the tenth century to the present, focussing on the disciplines' health, rejuvenation and longevity practices. The goals of the project are to reveal the entanglements of these historical traditions, and to trace the trajectories of their evolution as components of today's global healthcare and personal development industries. Our hypothesis is that practices aimed at achieving health, rejuvenation and longevity constitute a key area of exchange between the three disciplines, preparing the grounds for a series of important pharmaceutical and technological innovations and also profoundly influencing the discourses of today's medicalized forms of globalized yoga as well as of contemporary institutionalized forms of ayurveda and rasashastra. Drawing upon the primary historical sources of each respective tradition as well as on fieldwork data, the research team will explore the shared terminology, praxis and theory of these three disciplines. We will examine why, when and how health, rejuvenation and longevity practices were employed; how each discipline’s discourse and practical applications relates to those of the others; and how past encounters and cross-fertilizations impact on contemporary health-related practices in yogic, ayurvedic and alchemists’ milieus. The five-year project will be based at the Department of South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at Vienna University and carried out by an international team of 3 post-doctoral researchers. The research will be grounded in the fields of South Asian studies and social history. An international workshop and an international conference will be organized to present and discuss the research results, which will also be published in peer-reviewed journals, an edited volume, and in individual monographs. A project website will provide open access to all research results.

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-10
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-07
    Funder Contribution: 421,658 USD
    Partners: UBC
search
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
10 Projects, page 1 of 1
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 115766
    Partners: Bayer AG, The Structural Genomics Consortium, ETH Zurich, UOXF, PFIZER, NOVARTIS, Janssen (Belgium), Bayer Pharma AG, KI, DRX...
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 2R01DA028648-06
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-09
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5U01DA038886-05
    Funder Contribution: 973,265 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 3U01DA038886-05S1
    Funder Contribution: 294,957 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/M013693/1
    Funder Contribution: 272,801 GBP
    Partners: LANL, ECMWF, SFU, University of Reading, Met Office

    This project is about using moving meshes - r-adaptivity - to improve the predictive power of atmospheric flow simulations, which are used in the fields of numerical weather prediction and climate modelling. When the atmosphere is simulated on a computer, this is done by dividing the sphere into cells which are arranged in a mesh. There is a conflict between the need for accuracy, which requires smaller (and hence more) cells, and computational efficiency, which increases with the number of cells. A reasonable question to ask is: for a given amount of accuracy, what size of cells do I need? The answer can be provided mathematically, but it depends on what is actually happening in the atmosphere simulation. Much smaller cells are required in the regions of smaller scale features such as atmospheric fronts, cyclones, jets, convective cells etc. It then seems like a waste to choose the same cell size all over the globe even in regions where these features are absent. An attractive idea is to try to stretch, deform and move the mesh around so that smaller cells are used in the regions of small scale features, and larger cells are used elsewhere. This would mean that a better compromise can be made between accuracy and computational efficiency, thus improving predictive power for the same resource. This idea has been used successfully in many engineering applications, and the goal of this project is to transmit this technology to atmosphere simulation, where it can be used by meteorologists and climate scientists to take their science forward. There are, however, a number of challenging aspects. Efficient mesh movement algorithms have not previously been developed for the sphere geometry which is needed for global atmosphere simulations. There is the question of how to detect where the mesh should be moved to. It is also the case that it is very challenging to design stable and accurate numerical algorithms for simulating the atmosphere, and these must be adapted to remain stable and accurate under mesh movement. All of these questions and issues will be addressed in this project.

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-08
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 639363
    Overall Budget: 1,416,150 EURFunder Contribution: 1,416,150 EUR
    Partners: University of Vienna, UALBERTA, INFORM

    The project will examine the histories of yoga, ayurveda and rasashastra (Indian alchemy and iatrochemistry) from the tenth century to the present, focussing on the disciplines' health, rejuvenation and longevity practices. The goals of the project are to reveal the entanglements of these historical traditions, and to trace the trajectories of their evolution as components of today's global healthcare and personal development industries. Our hypothesis is that practices aimed at achieving health, rejuvenation and longevity constitute a key area of exchange between the three disciplines, preparing the grounds for a series of important pharmaceutical and technological innovations and also profoundly influencing the discourses of today's medicalized forms of globalized yoga as well as of contemporary institutionalized forms of ayurveda and rasashastra. Drawing upon the primary historical sources of each respective tradition as well as on fieldwork data, the research team will explore the shared terminology, praxis and theory of these three disciplines. We will examine why, when and how health, rejuvenation and longevity practices were employed; how each discipline’s discourse and practical applications relates to those of the others; and how past encounters and cross-fertilizations impact on contemporary health-related practices in yogic, ayurvedic and alchemists’ milieus. The five-year project will be based at the Department of South Asian, Tibetan and Buddhist Studies at Vienna University and carried out by an international team of 3 post-doctoral researchers. The research will be grounded in the fields of South Asian studies and social history. An international workshop and an international conference will be organized to present and discuss the research results, which will also be published in peer-reviewed journals, an edited volume, and in individual monographs. A project website will provide open access to all research results.

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-10
    Funder Contribution: 425,917 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 5R01DA028648-07
    Funder Contribution: 421,658 USD
    Partners: UBC