search
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
79 Projects, page 1 of 8

  • Canada
  • 2012-2021
  • 2016

10
arrow_drop_down
  • Funder: CHIST-ERA Project Code: M2CR
    Partners: Université du Mans / LIUM, Computer Vision Center, Université de Montréal / LISA

    Communication is one of the necessary condition to develop intelligence in living beings. Humans use several modalities to exchange information: speech, written text, both in many languages, gestures, images, and many more. There is evidence that human learning is more effective when several modalities are used. There is a large body of research to make computers process these modalities, and ultimately, understand human language. These modalities have been, however, generally addressed independently or at most in pairs. However, merging information from multiple modalities is best done at the highest levels of abstraction, which deep learning models are trained to capture. The M2CR project aims at developing a revolutionary approach to combine all these modalities and their respective tasks in one unified architecture, based on deep neural networks, including both a discriminant and a generative component through multiple levels of representation. Our system will jointly learn from resources in several modalities, including but not limited to text of several languages (European languages, Chinese and Arabic), speech and images. In doing so, the system will learn one common semantic representation of the underlying information, both at a channel-specific level and at a higher channel-independent level. Pushing these ideas to the large scale, e.g. training on very large corpora, the M2CR project has the ambition to advance the state-of-the-art in human language understanding (HLU). M2CR will address all major tasks in HLU by one unified architecture: speech understanding and translation, multilingual image retrieval and description, etc. The M2CR project will collect existing multimodal and multilingual corpora, extend them as needed, and make them freely available to the community. M2CR will also define shared tasks to set up a common evaluation framework and ease research for other institutions, beyond the partners of this consortium. All developed software and tools will be open-source. By these means, we hope to help to advance the field of human language.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 165171
    Funder Contribution: 36,600
    Partners: Fondements de l'éducation Faculté des sciences de l'éducation Université de Montréal
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/N018958/1
    Funder Contribution: 507,674 GBP
    Partners: University of Sheffield, 3DS, Maplesoft, Wolfram Research Europe Ltd, The Mathworks Ltd, University of London, University of Edinburgh, MICROSOFT RESEARCH LIMITED, N8 Research Partnership, University of Salford...

    "Software is the most prevalent of all the instruments used in modern science" [Goble 2014]. Scientific software is not just widely used [SSI 2014] but also widely developed. Yet much of it is developed by researchers who have little understanding of even the basics of modern software development with the knock-on effects to their productivity, and the reliability, readability and reproducibility of their software [Nature Biotechnology]. Many are long-tail researchers working in small groups - even Big Science operations like the SKA are operationally undertaken by individuals collectively. Technological development in software is more like a cliff-face than a ladder - there are many routes to the top, to a solution. Further, the cliff face is dynamic - constantly and quickly changing as new technologies emerge and decline. Determining which technologies to deploy and how best to deploy them is in itself a specialist domain, with many features of traditional research. Researchers need empowerment and training to give them confidence with the available equipment and the challenges they face. This role, akin to that of an Alpine guide, involves support, guidance, and load carrying. When optimally performed it results in a researcher who knows what challenges they can attack alone, and where they need appropriate support. Guides can help decide whether to exploit well-trodden paths or explore new possibilities as they navigate through this dynamic environment. These guides are highly trained, technology-centric, research-aware individuals who have a curiosity driven nature dedicated to supporting researchers by forging a research software support career. Such Research Software Engineers (RSEs) guide researchers through the technological landscape and form a human interface between scientist and computer. A well-functioning RSE group will not just add to an organisation's effectiveness, it will have a multiplicative effect since it will make every individual researcher more effective. It has the potential to improve the quality of research done across all University departments and faculties. My work plan provides a bottom-up approach to providing RSE services that is distinctive from yet complements the top-down approach provided by the EPRSC-funded Software Sustainability Institute. The outcomes of this fellowship will be: Local and National RSE Capability: A RSE Group at Sheffield as a credible roadmap for others pump-priming a UK national research software capability; and a national Continuing Professional Development programme for RSEs. Scalable software support methods: A scalable approach based on "nudging", to providing research software support for scientific software efficiency, sustainability and reproducibility, with quality-guidelines for research software and for researchers on how best to incorporate research software engineering support within their grant proposals. HPC for long-tail researchers: 'HPC-software ramps' and a pathway for standardised integration of HPC resources into Desktop Applications fit for modern scientific computing; a network of HPC-centric RSEs based around shared resources; and a portfolio of new research software courses developed with partners. Communication and public understanding: A communication campaign to raise the profile of research software exploiting high profile social media and online resources, establishing an informal forum for research software debate. References [Goble 2014] Goble, C. "Better Software, Better Research". IEEE Internet Computing 18(5): 4-8 (2014) [SSI 2014] Hettrick, S. "It's impossible to conduct research without software, say 7 out of 10 UK researchers" http://www.software.ac.uk/blog/2014-12-04-its-impossible-conduct-research-without-software-say-7-out-10-uk-researchers (2014) [Nature 2015] Editorial "Rule rewrite aims to clean up scientific software", Nature Biotechnology 520(7547) April 2015

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1F32CA203229-01A1X1
    Funder Contribution: 49,152 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 723770
    Overall Budget: 15,270,000 EURFunder Contribution: 5,039,100 EUR
    Partners: SFI, STW, BMBF, TÜBİTAK, ETAg, Ministry of Education, SAV, FRS FNRS, THE RESEARCH COUNCIL OF NORWAY, FCT...

    Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine and healthcare. The field takes advantage of the physical, chemical and biological properties of materials at the nanometer scale to be used for a better understanding of the biological mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level, leading to new targets for earlier and more precise diagnostics and therapeutics. Nanomedicine, rated among the six most promising Key Enabling Technologies, is one of the most important emerging areas of health research expected to contribute to one of the strategic challenges that Europe has to face in the future: Provide effective and affordable health care and assure the wellbeing of an increasingly aged population. EuroNanoMed III (ENM III) builds on the foundations of ENM I & II, which launched 7 successful joint calls for proposals since 2009, funded 51 transnational research projects involving 269 partners from 25 countries/regions, and allocated € 45,5 million to research projects from ENM funding agencies. ENM III consortium, reinforced with 12 new partners from Europe, Canada and Taiwan, is committed to fostering the competiveness of European nanomedicine actors taking into account recent changes in the landscape and new stakeholders and challenges, as identified in the SRIA in nanomedicine. The first joint call for proposals will be co-funded by ENM III partners and the EC. After the co-funded call, three additional joint transnational calls will be organized and strategic activities will be accomplished in collaboration with key initiatives in the field. ENM III actions focus on translatability of project results to clinical and industry needs.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 164760
    Funder Contribution: 59,000
    Partners: Faculté de Médecine Université Laval
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 696295
    Overall Budget: 14,403,800 EURFunder Contribution: 4,753,240 EUR
    Partners: DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND THE MARINE, SFI, DLR, STATE RESEARCH AGENCY OF SPAIN, MIUR, MCI, NCBR, SPW, ANR, Ministry of Education...

    ERA-HDHL is a proposal of ERA-NET Cofund in the field of nutrition and health to support the Joint Programme Initiative Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life (JPI HDHL). Nowadays, there is a high burden of non-communicable diseases due to unhealthy diet and lifestyle patterns. The 24 members of the JPI HDHL are working together to develop means to (1) motivate people to adopt healthier lifestyles including dietary choices and physical activity, (2) develop and produce healthy, high-quality, safe and sustainable foods and (3) prevent diet-related diseases. Between 2012 and 2015, JPI HDHL had implemented 7 JFAs with 40 M€ funds from national funding. The JPI HDHL is now set for further enhancement in tight coordination with the EC through the ERA-NET Cofund instrument. ERA-HDHL will provide a robust platform for implementing joint funding actions (JFAs) that address the needs identified in the JPI HDHL strategic research agenda and strengthen the research funding activities of JPI HDHL. An EC cofunded call on the identification and validation of biomarkers in nutrition and health will be implemented. For this foreseen action, the member countries of the JPI HDHL have doubled their financial commitment comparing to previous JFA implemented on a similar topic. Moreover, ERA-HDHL will launch at least 3 additional JFAs in line to fulfil the JPI HDHL objectives.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 158507
    Funder Contribution: 62,196
    Partners: Département de biochimie Faculté de Médecine Université de Montréal
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/K00008X/2
    Funder Contribution: 42,744 GBP
    Partners: Durham University, INGV (Nat Inst Volcanology and Geophys), University of London, SFU, UNSW, NOC, University of Bergen, Fugro (United Kingdom), UCD, FLE...

    Submarine landslides can be far larger than terrestrial landslides, and many generate destructive tsunamis. The Storegga Slide offshore Norway covers an area larger than Scotland and contains enough sediment to cover all of Scotland to a depth of 80 m. This huge slide occurred 8,200 years ago and extends for 800 km down slope. It produced a tsunami with a run up >20 m around the Norwegian Sea and 3-8 m on the Scottish mainland. The UK faces few other natural hazards that could cause damage on the scale of a repeat of the Storegga Slide tsunami. The Storegga Slide is not the only huge submarine slide in the Norwegian Sea. Published data suggest that there have been at least six such slides in the last 20,000 years. For instance, the Traenadjupet Slide occurred 4,000 years ago and involved ~900 km3 of sediment. Based on a recurrence interval of 4,000 years (2 events in the last 8,000 years, or 6 events in 20,000 years), there is a 5% probability of a major submarine slide, and possible tsunami, occurring in the next 200 years. Sedimentary deposits in Shetland dated at 1500 and 5500 years, in addition to the 8200 year Storegga deposit, are thought to indicate tsunami impacts and provide evidence that the Arctic tsunami hazard is still poorly understood. Given the potential impact of tsunamis generated by Arctic landslides, we need a rigorous assessment of the hazard they pose to the UK over the next 100-200 years, their potential cost to society, degree to which existing sea defences protect the UK, and how tsunami hazards could be incorporated into multi-hazard flood risk management. This project is timely because rapid climatic change in the Arctic could increase the risk posed by landslide-tsunamis. Crustal rebound associated with future ice melting may produce larger and more frequent earthquakes, such as probably triggered the Storegga Slide 8200 years ago. The Arctic is also predicted to undergo particularly rapid warming in the next few decades that could lead to dissociation of gas hydrates (ice-like compounds of methane and water) in marine sediments, weakening the sediment and potentially increasing the landsliding risk. Our objectives will be achieved through an integrated series of work blocks that examine the frequency of landslides in the Norwegian Sea preserved in the recent geological record, associated tsunami deposits in Shetland, future trends in frequency and size of earthquakes due to ice melting, slope stability and tsunami generation by landslides, tsunami inundation of the UK and potential societal costs. This forms a work flow that starts with observations of past landslides and evolves through modelling of their consequences to predicting and costing the consequences of potential future landslides and associated tsunamis. Particular attention will be paid to societal impacts and mitigation strategies, including examination of the effectiveness of current sea defences. This will be achieved through engagement of stakeholders from the start of the project, including government agencies that manage UK flood risk, international bodies responsible for tsunami warning systems, and the re-insurance sector. The main deliverables will be: (i) better understanding of frequency of past Arctic landslides and resulting tsunami impact on the UK (ii) improved models for submarine landslides and associated tsunamis that help to understand why certain landslides cause tsunamis, and others don't. (iii) a single modelling strategy that starts with a coupled landslide-tsunami source, tracks propagation of the tsunami across the Norwegian Sea, and ends with inundation of the UK coast. Tsunami sources of various sizes and origins will be tested (iv) a detailed evaluation of the consequences and societal cost to the UK of tsunami flooding , including the effectiveness of existing flood defences (v) an assessment of how climate change may alter landslide frequency and thus tsunami risk to the UK.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 164667
    Funder Contribution: 58,882
    Partners: University of Toronto, Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Boone Lab
search
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
79 Projects, page 1 of 8
  • Funder: CHIST-ERA Project Code: M2CR
    Partners: Université du Mans / LIUM, Computer Vision Center, Université de Montréal / LISA

    Communication is one of the necessary condition to develop intelligence in living beings. Humans use several modalities to exchange information: speech, written text, both in many languages, gestures, images, and many more. There is evidence that human learning is more effective when several modalities are used. There is a large body of research to make computers process these modalities, and ultimately, understand human language. These modalities have been, however, generally addressed independently or at most in pairs. However, merging information from multiple modalities is best done at the highest levels of abstraction, which deep learning models are trained to capture. The M2CR project aims at developing a revolutionary approach to combine all these modalities and their respective tasks in one unified architecture, based on deep neural networks, including both a discriminant and a generative component through multiple levels of representation. Our system will jointly learn from resources in several modalities, including but not limited to text of several languages (European languages, Chinese and Arabic), speech and images. In doing so, the system will learn one common semantic representation of the underlying information, both at a channel-specific level and at a higher channel-independent level. Pushing these ideas to the large scale, e.g. training on very large corpora, the M2CR project has the ambition to advance the state-of-the-art in human language understanding (HLU). M2CR will address all major tasks in HLU by one unified architecture: speech understanding and translation, multilingual image retrieval and description, etc. The M2CR project will collect existing multimodal and multilingual corpora, extend them as needed, and make them freely available to the community. M2CR will also define shared tasks to set up a common evaluation framework and ease research for other institutions, beyond the partners of this consortium. All developed software and tools will be open-source. By these means, we hope to help to advance the field of human language.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 165171
    Funder Contribution: 36,600
    Partners: Fondements de l'éducation Faculté des sciences de l'éducation Université de Montréal
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/N018958/1
    Funder Contribution: 507,674 GBP
    Partners: University of Sheffield, 3DS, Maplesoft, Wolfram Research Europe Ltd, The Mathworks Ltd, University of London, University of Edinburgh, MICROSOFT RESEARCH LIMITED, N8 Research Partnership, University of Salford...

    "Software is the most prevalent of all the instruments used in modern science" [Goble 2014]. Scientific software is not just widely used [SSI 2014] but also widely developed. Yet much of it is developed by researchers who have little understanding of even the basics of modern software development with the knock-on effects to their productivity, and the reliability, readability and reproducibility of their software [Nature Biotechnology]. Many are long-tail researchers working in small groups - even Big Science operations like the SKA are operationally undertaken by individuals collectively. Technological development in software is more like a cliff-face than a ladder - there are many routes to the top, to a solution. Further, the cliff face is dynamic - constantly and quickly changing as new technologies emerge and decline. Determining which technologies to deploy and how best to deploy them is in itself a specialist domain, with many features of traditional research. Researchers need empowerment and training to give them confidence with the available equipment and the challenges they face. This role, akin to that of an Alpine guide, involves support, guidance, and load carrying. When optimally performed it results in a researcher who knows what challenges they can attack alone, and where they need appropriate support. Guides can help decide whether to exploit well-trodden paths or explore new possibilities as they navigate through this dynamic environment. These guides are highly trained, technology-centric, research-aware individuals who have a curiosity driven nature dedicated to supporting researchers by forging a research software support career. Such Research Software Engineers (RSEs) guide researchers through the technological landscape and form a human interface between scientist and computer. A well-functioning RSE group will not just add to an organisation's effectiveness, it will have a multiplicative effect since it will make every individual researcher more effective. It has the potential to improve the quality of research done across all University departments and faculties. My work plan provides a bottom-up approach to providing RSE services that is distinctive from yet complements the top-down approach provided by the EPRSC-funded Software Sustainability Institute. The outcomes of this fellowship will be: Local and National RSE Capability: A RSE Group at Sheffield as a credible roadmap for others pump-priming a UK national research software capability; and a national Continuing Professional Development programme for RSEs. Scalable software support methods: A scalable approach based on "nudging", to providing research software support for scientific software efficiency, sustainability and reproducibility, with quality-guidelines for research software and for researchers on how best to incorporate research software engineering support within their grant proposals. HPC for long-tail researchers: 'HPC-software ramps' and a pathway for standardised integration of HPC resources into Desktop Applications fit for modern scientific computing; a network of HPC-centric RSEs based around shared resources; and a portfolio of new research software courses developed with partners. Communication and public understanding: A communication campaign to raise the profile of research software exploiting high profile social media and online resources, establishing an informal forum for research software debate. References [Goble 2014] Goble, C. "Better Software, Better Research". IEEE Internet Computing 18(5): 4-8 (2014) [SSI 2014] Hettrick, S. "It's impossible to conduct research without software, say 7 out of 10 UK researchers" http://www.software.ac.uk/blog/2014-12-04-its-impossible-conduct-research-without-software-say-7-out-10-uk-researchers (2014) [Nature 2015] Editorial "Rule rewrite aims to clean up scientific software", Nature Biotechnology 520(7547) April 2015

  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1F32CA203229-01A1X1
    Funder Contribution: 49,152 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 723770
    Overall Budget: 15,270,000 EURFunder Contribution: 5,039,100 EUR
    Partners: SFI, STW, BMBF, TÜBİTAK, ETAg, Ministry of Education, SAV, FRS FNRS, THE RESEARCH COUNCIL OF NORWAY, FCT...

    Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine and healthcare. The field takes advantage of the physical, chemical and biological properties of materials at the nanometer scale to be used for a better understanding of the biological mechanisms of diseases at the molecular level, leading to new targets for earlier and more precise diagnostics and therapeutics. Nanomedicine, rated among the six most promising Key Enabling Technologies, is one of the most important emerging areas of health research expected to contribute to one of the strategic challenges that Europe has to face in the future: Provide effective and affordable health care and assure the wellbeing of an increasingly aged population. EuroNanoMed III (ENM III) builds on the foundations of ENM I & II, which launched 7 successful joint calls for proposals since 2009, funded 51 transnational research projects involving 269 partners from 25 countries/regions, and allocated € 45,5 million to research projects from ENM funding agencies. ENM III consortium, reinforced with 12 new partners from Europe, Canada and Taiwan, is committed to fostering the competiveness of European nanomedicine actors taking into account recent changes in the landscape and new stakeholders and challenges, as identified in the SRIA in nanomedicine. The first joint call for proposals will be co-funded by ENM III partners and the EC. After the co-funded call, three additional joint transnational calls will be organized and strategic activities will be accomplished in collaboration with key initiatives in the field. ENM III actions focus on translatability of project results to clinical and industry needs.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 164760
    Funder Contribution: 59,000
    Partners: Faculté de Médecine Université Laval
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 696295
    Overall Budget: 14,403,800 EURFunder Contribution: 4,753,240 EUR
    Partners: DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, FOOD AND THE MARINE, SFI, DLR, STATE RESEARCH AGENCY OF SPAIN, MIUR, MCI, NCBR, SPW, ANR, Ministry of Education...

    ERA-HDHL is a proposal of ERA-NET Cofund in the field of nutrition and health to support the Joint Programme Initiative Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life (JPI HDHL). Nowadays, there is a high burden of non-communicable diseases due to unhealthy diet and lifestyle patterns. The 24 members of the JPI HDHL are working together to develop means to (1) motivate people to adopt healthier lifestyles including dietary choices and physical activity, (2) develop and produce healthy, high-quality, safe and sustainable foods and (3) prevent diet-related diseases. Between 2012 and 2015, JPI HDHL had implemented 7 JFAs with 40 M€ funds from national funding. The JPI HDHL is now set for further enhancement in tight coordination with the EC through the ERA-NET Cofund instrument. ERA-HDHL will provide a robust platform for implementing joint funding actions (JFAs) that address the needs identified in the JPI HDHL strategic research agenda and strengthen the research funding activities of JPI HDHL. An EC cofunded call on the identification and validation of biomarkers in nutrition and health will be implemented. For this foreseen action, the member countries of the JPI HDHL have doubled their financial commitment comparing to previous JFA implemented on a similar topic. Moreover, ERA-HDHL will launch at least 3 additional JFAs in line to fulfil the JPI HDHL objectives.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 158507
    Funder Contribution: 62,196
    Partners: Département de biochimie Faculté de Médecine Université de Montréal
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/K00008X/2
    Funder Contribution: 42,744 GBP
    Partners: Durham University, INGV (Nat Inst Volcanology and Geophys), University of London, SFU, UNSW, NOC, University of Bergen, Fugro (United Kingdom), UCD, FLE...

    Submarine landslides can be far larger than terrestrial landslides, and many generate destructive tsunamis. The Storegga Slide offshore Norway covers an area larger than Scotland and contains enough sediment to cover all of Scotland to a depth of 80 m. This huge slide occurred 8,200 years ago and extends for 800 km down slope. It produced a tsunami with a run up >20 m around the Norwegian Sea and 3-8 m on the Scottish mainland. The UK faces few other natural hazards that could cause damage on the scale of a repeat of the Storegga Slide tsunami. The Storegga Slide is not the only huge submarine slide in the Norwegian Sea. Published data suggest that there have been at least six such slides in the last 20,000 years. For instance, the Traenadjupet Slide occurred 4,000 years ago and involved ~900 km3 of sediment. Based on a recurrence interval of 4,000 years (2 events in the last 8,000 years, or 6 events in 20,000 years), there is a 5% probability of a major submarine slide, and possible tsunami, occurring in the next 200 years. Sedimentary deposits in Shetland dated at 1500 and 5500 years, in addition to the 8200 year Storegga deposit, are thought to indicate tsunami impacts and provide evidence that the Arctic tsunami hazard is still poorly understood. Given the potential impact of tsunamis generated by Arctic landslides, we need a rigorous assessment of the hazard they pose to the UK over the next 100-200 years, their potential cost to society, degree to which existing sea defences protect the UK, and how tsunami hazards could be incorporated into multi-hazard flood risk management. This project is timely because rapid climatic change in the Arctic could increase the risk posed by landslide-tsunamis. Crustal rebound associated with future ice melting may produce larger and more frequent earthquakes, such as probably triggered the Storegga Slide 8200 years ago. The Arctic is also predicted to undergo particularly rapid warming in the next few decades that could lead to dissociation of gas hydrates (ice-like compounds of methane and water) in marine sediments, weakening the sediment and potentially increasing the landsliding risk. Our objectives will be achieved through an integrated series of work blocks that examine the frequency of landslides in the Norwegian Sea preserved in the recent geological record, associated tsunami deposits in Shetland, future trends in frequency and size of earthquakes due to ice melting, slope stability and tsunami generation by landslides, tsunami inundation of the UK and potential societal costs. This forms a work flow that starts with observations of past landslides and evolves through modelling of their consequences to predicting and costing the consequences of potential future landslides and associated tsunamis. Particular attention will be paid to societal impacts and mitigation strategies, including examination of the effectiveness of current sea defences. This will be achieved through engagement of stakeholders from the start of the project, including government agencies that manage UK flood risk, international bodies responsible for tsunami warning systems, and the re-insurance sector. The main deliverables will be: (i) better understanding of frequency of past Arctic landslides and resulting tsunami impact on the UK (ii) improved models for submarine landslides and associated tsunamis that help to understand why certain landslides cause tsunamis, and others don't. (iii) a single modelling strategy that starts with a coupled landslide-tsunami source, tracks propagation of the tsunami across the Norwegian Sea, and ends with inundation of the UK coast. Tsunami sources of various sizes and origins will be tested (iv) a detailed evaluation of the consequences and societal cost to the UK of tsunami flooding , including the effectiveness of existing flood defences (v) an assessment of how climate change may alter landslide frequency and thus tsunami risk to the UK.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 164667
    Funder Contribution: 58,882
    Partners: University of Toronto, Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research, Boone Lab