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The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
66 Projects, page 1 of 7

  • Canada
  • 2017-2021
  • 2018

10
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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/R012849/1
    Funder Contribution: 387,179 GBP
    Partners: University of Manitoba, Alfred Wegener Inst for Polar & Marine R, University of Bristol

    Following the polar amplification of global warming in recent decades, we have witnessed unprecedented changes in the coverage and seasonality of Arctic sea ice, enhanced freshwater storage within the Arctic seas, and greater nutrient demand from pelagic primary producers as the annual duration of open-ocean increases. These processes have the potential to change the phenology, species composition, productivity, and nutritional value of Arctic sea ice algal blooms, with far-reaching implications for trophic functioning and carbon cycling in the marine system. As the environmental conditions of the Arctic continue to change, the habitat for ice algae will become increasingly disrupted. Ice algal blooms, which are predominantly species of diatom, provide a concentrated food source for aquatic grazers while phytoplankton growth in the water column is limited, and can contribute up to half of annual Arctic marine primary production. Conventionally ice algae have been studied as a single community, without discriminating between individual species. However, the composition of species can vary widely between regions, and over the course of the spring, as a function of local environmental forcing. Consequently, current approaches for estimating Arctic-wide marine productivity and predicting the impact of climate warming on ice algal communities are likely inaccurate because they overlook the autecological (species-specific) responses of sea ice algae to changing ice habitat conditions. Diatom-ARCTIC will mark a new chapter in the study of sea ice algae and their production in the Arctic. Our project goes beyond others by integrating the results derived from field observations of community composition, and innovative laboratory experiments targeted at single-species of ice algae, directly into a predictive biogeochemical model. The use of a Remotely-Operated Vehicle during in situ field sampling gives us a unique opportunity to examine the spatio-temporal environmental controls on algal speciation in natural sea ice. Diatom-ARCTIC field observations will steer laboratory experiments to identify photophysiological responses of individual diatom species over a range of key growth conditions: light, salinity and nutrient availability. Additional experiments will characterise algal lipid composition as a function of growth conditions - quantifying food resource quality as a function of species composition. Furthermore, novel analytical tools, such as gas chromatography mass spectrometry and compound specific isotope analysis will be combined to better catalogue the types of lipid present in ice algae. Field and laboratory results will then be incorporated into the state-of-the-art BFM-SI biogeochemical model for ice algae, to enable accurate simulations of gross and net production in sea ice based on directly observed autecological responses. The model will be used to characterise algal productivity in different sea ice growth habitats present in the contemporary Arctic. By applying future climate scenarios to the model, we will also forecast ice algal productivity over the coming decades as sea ice habitats transform in an evolving Arctic. Our project targets a major research gap in Phase I of the CAO programme: the specific contribution of sea ice habitats to ecosystem structure and biogeochemical functioning within the Arctic Ocean. In doing so, Diatom-ARCTIC brings together and links the activities of ARCTIC-Prize and DIAPOD, while further building new collaborations between UK and German partners leading up to the 2019/20 MOSAiC campaign.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 175028
    Funder Contribution: 81,800
    Partners: University of British Columbia Centre for Biodiversity Research
  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 825903
    Overall Budget: 6,039,980 EURFunder Contribution: 5,395,290 EUR
    Partners: McGill University, ESC/ SEC, FUNDACIO CENTRE DE REGULACIO GENOMICA, UKE, McMaster University, Lynkeus (Italy), BSC, UB, KUL, NBD...

    euCanSHare will develop the first centralised, secure and sustainable platform for enhanced cross-border data sharing and multi-cohort personalised medicine research in cardiology. At its heart, the platform will contain the most comprehensive cardiovascular data catalogue ever assembled, which will facilitate data discoverability and exploitation in full alignment with the FAIR principles. The project will implement the interoperability of currently fragmented yet mature IT solutions developed by the consortium members for generating a comprehensive multi-functionality platform. It will also integrate major cardiovascular data sources from Europe and Canada, including the renowned MORGAM, BiomarCaRE and CAHHM initiatives. euCanSHare’s legal framework will be built through detailed ethical and legal interoperability analysis, while investigating innovative solutions for promoting responsible Open Science based on the emerging blockchain technology. Initially populated with 35 European and Canadian cohorts (corresponding to about one million records), the platform will provide extensive functionalities, including for data deposition, data harmonisation and quality control, which will support the integration of new cohorts beyond the duration of the project, thus ensuring its scalability. Moreover, sustainability will be targeted by leveraging through our multi-disciplinary partners the most established data infrastructures, namely ELIXIR, EGA, BBMRI and euro-BioImaging in Europe, as well as Maelstrom from Canada. The unique features of the platform will be demonstrated and adjusted through several use cases, including for biomarker validation, knowledge discovery, cardiovascular risk assessment, public health research and industry-driven studies. Furthermore, intensive outreach campaigns and hands-on workshops will be organised to attract a range of stakeholders, data providers and end-users from the academic, public health and industrial sectors.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 181778
    Funder Contribution: 73,600
    Partners: Département de Génie Electrique Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 818116
    Overall Budget: 3,590,470 EURFunder Contribution: 3,520,470 EUR
    Partners: UW, EUFIC, MCTeIP, AUA, UNICAMP, Pondicherry University, UNITO, BIOECONOMY, RESEARCH AND ADVISORY, VL O, Tallinn University of Technology...

    The proposed Coordination and Support Action (CSA) has the overall objective to establish an international network of experts and stakeholders in the field of microbiome food system research, elaborating microbiomes from various environments such as terrestrial, plant, aquatic, food and human/animal and assess their applicability and impact on the food system. MICROBIOMESUPPORT will follow the approach of food system and integrate actors and experts from all stages in this circular economy of food. The food system approach is part of the FOOD 2030 concept to promote a systems approach to research and innovation (R&I). MICROBIOMESUPPORT will be one of the key drivers to implement FOOD 2030 strategies, will facilitate multi-actor engagement to align, structure and boost R&I in microbiome and will support the European Commission by coordinating the activities, meetings, workshops and results from the International Bioeconomy Forum (IBF) working group ‘Food Systems Microbiome’. The main concept behind MICROBIOMESUPPORT IS to boost the bioeconomy and the FOOD 2030 strategy, by focusing on the new avenues generated by microbiome R&I efforts. MICROBIOMESUPPORT WILL have a main impact on the coordination of commonly defined R&I agendas which will be incorporated into regional, national, European but also global funding programmes related to microbiomes in food systems. MICROBIOMESUPPORT will create a collaborative international network and integrate know-how in plant, terrestrial, animal, human and aquatic microbiome R&I as well as expertise in bioeconomy applications. MICROBIOMESUPPORT has integrated international partners form Brazil, Canada, South Africa, China, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, India and USA in order to improve the international cooperation and coordination of common bioeconomy research programmes and set a basis for common microbiome R&I agendas.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 181411
    Funder Contribution: 44,600
    Partners: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS) University of Toronto
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R01CA221918-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 411,369 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1RF1MH117805-01
    Funder Contribution: 534,296 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 181575
    Funder Contribution: 77,667
    Partners: Strategy and International Business Cambridge Judge Business School University of Cambridge, Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation Gustavson School of Business University of Victoria
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/R034567/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,579,790 GBP
    Partners: Google Inc, University of Cambridge, AU, GCHQ, KAIST, University of Toronto, Advanced Risc Machines (Arm), Max Planck, Imperial College London, INRIA...

    Modern society faces a fundamental problem: the reliability of complex, evolving software systems on which it critically depends cannot be guaranteed by the established, non-mathematical techniques, such as informal prose specification and ad-hoc testing. Modern companies are moving fast, leaving little time for code analysis and testing; concurrent and distributed programs cannot be adequately assessed via traditional testing methods; users of mobile applications neglect to apply software fixes; and malicious users increasingly exploit programming errors, causing major security disruptions. Trustworthy, reliable software is becoming harder to achieve, whilst new business and cyber-security challenges make it of escalating importance. Developers cope with complexity using abstraction: the breaking up of systems into components and layers connected via software interfaces. These interfaces are described using specifications: for example, documentation in English; test suites with varying degrees of rigour; static typing embedded in programming languages; and formal specifications written in various logics. In computer science, despite widespread agreement on the importance of abstraction, specifications are often seen as an afterthought and a hindrance to software development, and are rarely justified. Formal specification as part of the industrial software design process is in its infancy. My over-arching research vision is to bring scientific, mathematical method to the specification and verification of modern software systems. A fundamental unifying theme of my current work is my unique emphasis on what it means for a formal specification to be appropriate for the task in hand, properly evaluated and useful for real-world applications. Specifications should be validated, with proper evidence that they describe what they should. This validation can come in many forms, from formal verification through systematic testing to precise argumentation that a formal specification accurately captures an English standard. Specifications should be useful, identifying compositional building blocks that are intuitive and helpful to clients both now and in future. Specifications should be just right, providing a clear logical boundary between implementations and client programs. VeTSpec has four related objectives, exploring different strengths of program specification, real-world program library specification and mechanised language specification, in each case determining what it means for the specification to be appropriate, properly evaluated and useful for real-world applications. Objective A: Tractable reasoning about concurrency and distribution is a long-standing, difficult problem. I will develop the fundamental theory for the verified specification of concurrent programs and distributed systems, focussing on safety properties for programs based on primitive atomic commands, safety properties for programs based on more complex atomic transactions used in software transactional memory and distributed databases, and progress properties. Objective B: JavaScript is the most widespread dynamic language, used by 94.8% of websites. Its dynamic nature and complex semantics make it a difficult target for verified specification. I will develop logic-based analysis tools for the specification, verification and testing of JavaScript programs, intertwining theoretical results with properly engineered tool development. Objective C: The mechanised specification of real-world programming languages is well-established. Such specifications are difficult to maintain and their use is not fully explored. I will provide a maintainable mechanised specification of Javascript, together with systematic test generation from this specification. Objective D: I will explore fundamental, conceptual questions associated with the ambitious VeTSpec goal to bring scientific, mathematical method to the specification of modern software systems.

search
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
66 Projects, page 1 of 7
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/R012849/1
    Funder Contribution: 387,179 GBP
    Partners: University of Manitoba, Alfred Wegener Inst for Polar & Marine R, University of Bristol

    Following the polar amplification of global warming in recent decades, we have witnessed unprecedented changes in the coverage and seasonality of Arctic sea ice, enhanced freshwater storage within the Arctic seas, and greater nutrient demand from pelagic primary producers as the annual duration of open-ocean increases. These processes have the potential to change the phenology, species composition, productivity, and nutritional value of Arctic sea ice algal blooms, with far-reaching implications for trophic functioning and carbon cycling in the marine system. As the environmental conditions of the Arctic continue to change, the habitat for ice algae will become increasingly disrupted. Ice algal blooms, which are predominantly species of diatom, provide a concentrated food source for aquatic grazers while phytoplankton growth in the water column is limited, and can contribute up to half of annual Arctic marine primary production. Conventionally ice algae have been studied as a single community, without discriminating between individual species. However, the composition of species can vary widely between regions, and over the course of the spring, as a function of local environmental forcing. Consequently, current approaches for estimating Arctic-wide marine productivity and predicting the impact of climate warming on ice algal communities are likely inaccurate because they overlook the autecological (species-specific) responses of sea ice algae to changing ice habitat conditions. Diatom-ARCTIC will mark a new chapter in the study of sea ice algae and their production in the Arctic. Our project goes beyond others by integrating the results derived from field observations of community composition, and innovative laboratory experiments targeted at single-species of ice algae, directly into a predictive biogeochemical model. The use of a Remotely-Operated Vehicle during in situ field sampling gives us a unique opportunity to examine the spatio-temporal environmental controls on algal speciation in natural sea ice. Diatom-ARCTIC field observations will steer laboratory experiments to identify photophysiological responses of individual diatom species over a range of key growth conditions: light, salinity and nutrient availability. Additional experiments will characterise algal lipid composition as a function of growth conditions - quantifying food resource quality as a function of species composition. Furthermore, novel analytical tools, such as gas chromatography mass spectrometry and compound specific isotope analysis will be combined to better catalogue the types of lipid present in ice algae. Field and laboratory results will then be incorporated into the state-of-the-art BFM-SI biogeochemical model for ice algae, to enable accurate simulations of gross and net production in sea ice based on directly observed autecological responses. The model will be used to characterise algal productivity in different sea ice growth habitats present in the contemporary Arctic. By applying future climate scenarios to the model, we will also forecast ice algal productivity over the coming decades as sea ice habitats transform in an evolving Arctic. Our project targets a major research gap in Phase I of the CAO programme: the specific contribution of sea ice habitats to ecosystem structure and biogeochemical functioning within the Arctic Ocean. In doing so, Diatom-ARCTIC brings together and links the activities of ARCTIC-Prize and DIAPOD, while further building new collaborations between UK and German partners leading up to the 2019/20 MOSAiC campaign.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 175028
    Funder Contribution: 81,800
    Partners: University of British Columbia Centre for Biodiversity Research
  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 825903
    Overall Budget: 6,039,980 EURFunder Contribution: 5,395,290 EUR
    Partners: McGill University, ESC/ SEC, FUNDACIO CENTRE DE REGULACIO GENOMICA, UKE, McMaster University, Lynkeus (Italy), BSC, UB, KUL, NBD...

    euCanSHare will develop the first centralised, secure and sustainable platform for enhanced cross-border data sharing and multi-cohort personalised medicine research in cardiology. At its heart, the platform will contain the most comprehensive cardiovascular data catalogue ever assembled, which will facilitate data discoverability and exploitation in full alignment with the FAIR principles. The project will implement the interoperability of currently fragmented yet mature IT solutions developed by the consortium members for generating a comprehensive multi-functionality platform. It will also integrate major cardiovascular data sources from Europe and Canada, including the renowned MORGAM, BiomarCaRE and CAHHM initiatives. euCanSHare’s legal framework will be built through detailed ethical and legal interoperability analysis, while investigating innovative solutions for promoting responsible Open Science based on the emerging blockchain technology. Initially populated with 35 European and Canadian cohorts (corresponding to about one million records), the platform will provide extensive functionalities, including for data deposition, data harmonisation and quality control, which will support the integration of new cohorts beyond the duration of the project, thus ensuring its scalability. Moreover, sustainability will be targeted by leveraging through our multi-disciplinary partners the most established data infrastructures, namely ELIXIR, EGA, BBMRI and euro-BioImaging in Europe, as well as Maelstrom from Canada. The unique features of the platform will be demonstrated and adjusted through several use cases, including for biomarker validation, knowledge discovery, cardiovascular risk assessment, public health research and industry-driven studies. Furthermore, intensive outreach campaigns and hands-on workshops will be organised to attract a range of stakeholders, data providers and end-users from the academic, public health and industrial sectors.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 181778
    Funder Contribution: 73,600
    Partners: Département de Génie Electrique Ecole Polytechnique de Montréal
  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 818116
    Overall Budget: 3,590,470 EURFunder Contribution: 3,520,470 EUR
    Partners: UW, EUFIC, MCTeIP, AUA, UNICAMP, Pondicherry University, UNITO, BIOECONOMY, RESEARCH AND ADVISORY, VL O, Tallinn University of Technology...

    The proposed Coordination and Support Action (CSA) has the overall objective to establish an international network of experts and stakeholders in the field of microbiome food system research, elaborating microbiomes from various environments such as terrestrial, plant, aquatic, food and human/animal and assess their applicability and impact on the food system. MICROBIOMESUPPORT will follow the approach of food system and integrate actors and experts from all stages in this circular economy of food. The food system approach is part of the FOOD 2030 concept to promote a systems approach to research and innovation (R&I). MICROBIOMESUPPORT will be one of the key drivers to implement FOOD 2030 strategies, will facilitate multi-actor engagement to align, structure and boost R&I in microbiome and will support the European Commission by coordinating the activities, meetings, workshops and results from the International Bioeconomy Forum (IBF) working group ‘Food Systems Microbiome’. The main concept behind MICROBIOMESUPPORT IS to boost the bioeconomy and the FOOD 2030 strategy, by focusing on the new avenues generated by microbiome R&I efforts. MICROBIOMESUPPORT WILL have a main impact on the coordination of commonly defined R&I agendas which will be incorporated into regional, national, European but also global funding programmes related to microbiomes in food systems. MICROBIOMESUPPORT will create a collaborative international network and integrate know-how in plant, terrestrial, animal, human and aquatic microbiome R&I as well as expertise in bioeconomy applications. MICROBIOMESUPPORT has integrated international partners form Brazil, Canada, South Africa, China, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, India and USA in order to improve the international cooperation and coordination of common bioeconomy research programmes and set a basis for common microbiome R&I agendas.

  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 181411
    Funder Contribution: 44,600
    Partners: Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies (CRRS) University of Toronto
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1R01CA221918-01A1
    Funder Contribution: 411,369 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: NIH Project Code: 1RF1MH117805-01
    Funder Contribution: 534,296 USD
    Partners: UBC
  • Funder: SNSF Project Code: 181575
    Funder Contribution: 77,667
    Partners: Strategy and International Business Cambridge Judge Business School University of Cambridge, Centre for Social and Sustainable Innovation Gustavson School of Business University of Victoria
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/R034567/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,579,790 GBP
    Partners: Google Inc, University of Cambridge, AU, GCHQ, KAIST, University of Toronto, Advanced Risc Machines (Arm), Max Planck, Imperial College London, INRIA...

    Modern society faces a fundamental problem: the reliability of complex, evolving software systems on which it critically depends cannot be guaranteed by the established, non-mathematical techniques, such as informal prose specification and ad-hoc testing. Modern companies are moving fast, leaving little time for code analysis and testing; concurrent and distributed programs cannot be adequately assessed via traditional testing methods; users of mobile applications neglect to apply software fixes; and malicious users increasingly exploit programming errors, causing major security disruptions. Trustworthy, reliable software is becoming harder to achieve, whilst new business and cyber-security challenges make it of escalating importance. Developers cope with complexity using abstraction: the breaking up of systems into components and layers connected via software interfaces. These interfaces are described using specifications: for example, documentation in English; test suites with varying degrees of rigour; static typing embedded in programming languages; and formal specifications written in various logics. In computer science, despite widespread agreement on the importance of abstraction, specifications are often seen as an afterthought and a hindrance to software development, and are rarely justified. Formal specification as part of the industrial software design process is in its infancy. My over-arching research vision is to bring scientific, mathematical method to the specification and verification of modern software systems. A fundamental unifying theme of my current work is my unique emphasis on what it means for a formal specification to be appropriate for the task in hand, properly evaluated and useful for real-world applications. Specifications should be validated, with proper evidence that they describe what they should. This validation can come in many forms, from formal verification through systematic testing to precise argumentation that a formal specification accurately captures an English standard. Specifications should be useful, identifying compositional building blocks that are intuitive and helpful to clients both now and in future. Specifications should be just right, providing a clear logical boundary between implementations and client programs. VeTSpec has four related objectives, exploring different strengths of program specification, real-world program library specification and mechanised language specification, in each case determining what it means for the specification to be appropriate, properly evaluated and useful for real-world applications. Objective A: Tractable reasoning about concurrency and distribution is a long-standing, difficult problem. I will develop the fundamental theory for the verified specification of concurrent programs and distributed systems, focussing on safety properties for programs based on primitive atomic commands, safety properties for programs based on more complex atomic transactions used in software transactional memory and distributed databases, and progress properties. Objective B: JavaScript is the most widespread dynamic language, used by 94.8% of websites. Its dynamic nature and complex semantics make it a difficult target for verified specification. I will develop logic-based analysis tools for the specification, verification and testing of JavaScript programs, intertwining theoretical results with properly engineered tool development. Objective C: The mechanised specification of real-world programming languages is well-established. Such specifications are difficult to maintain and their use is not fully explored. I will provide a maintainable mechanised specification of Javascript, together with systematic test generation from this specification. Objective D: I will explore fundamental, conceptual questions associated with the ambitious VeTSpec goal to bring scientific, mathematical method to the specification of modern software systems.