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  • Canada
  • 2021-2021
  • English
  • VIUSpace
  • Energy Research

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  • Publication . Article . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 12 Aug 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Susan Morrissey Wyse; Runa Das; Christina E. Hoicka; Yuxu Zhao; Maria-Louise McMaster;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media
    Country: Canada

    The diffusion of low-carbon innovations, including innovative products and services, is required to accelerate a low-carbon energy transition. These innovations also have the potential to alleviate and perpetuate existing social inequities, calling into question their “justness.” Energy justice is a useful analytical tool for framing justice questions related to energy. In this paper, we ask whether demand-side low-carbon energy innovations are meeting energy justice criteria. To address this question, this study develops four indicators from existing energy justice frameworks and applies them to a range of demand-side innovations offered to energy users in Ontario. The indicators are used to assess innovation availability, affordability, information, and involvement. Innovations were identified using surveys and desk research across Ontario's energy technology innovation system (ETIS). One hundred twenty-two innovations are analyzed for these four indicators, and according to intended innovation users and innovation providers. Findings suggest that three of the four indicators—availability, affordability and information are broadly being addressed, while involvement was more difficult to establish. However, the ETIS may be perpetuating inequities through an over emphasis of innovations for particular energy users, such as private businesses, alongside under-emphasis on potentially marginalized actors, such as low-income households and renters. Furthermore, government-delivered, publicly owned or regulated innovation providers place a greater emphasis on energy justice, including the provision of innovations for marginalized actors. This study aids our understanding of energy justice in low-carbon energy innovations and is critical given that in the context of funding cuts to public services, there may be an increased reliance on decentralized actors. The consideration of justice gaps that emerge through such decentralization should not be overlooked. Our findings suggest that within Ontario's ETIS, who provides innovations matters. Given the insights presented in this study, this research approach and the developed indicators could be applied to other contexts and socio-technical systems. The application of energy justice indicators, derived from existing scholarship, therefore presents an important opportunity to address current and understudied practical energy challenges. Citation: Wyse SM, Das RR, Hoicka CE, Zhao Y and McMaster M-L (2021) Investigating Energy Justice in Demand-Side Low-Carbon Innovations in Ontario. Front. Sustain. Cities 3:633122. doi: 10.3389/frsc.2021.633122 Copyright © 2021 Wyse, Das, Hoicka, Zhao and McMaster. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0). First publication by Frontiers Media. The definitive version of record is available at https://doi.org/10.3389/frsc.2021.633122

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tugaine, Annet;
    Country: Canada

    Energy is the dominant climate change contributor accounting for around 60% of total global gas emissions. Given the growing concerns and complexities associated with climate change, most countries worldwide have committed to delivering clean energy. One way to attain this is to invest in energy-efficient technologies such as efficient light bulb technologies. This study’s question was; what determines households’ energy efficiency light bulb adoption in Kiwatule? The main objective of this study was to investigate the behaviour and attitudes of households adopting energy-efficient light bulbs in Kiwatule. The research findings indicated financial motivation as the major determinant of efficient light bulb adoption. To facilitate this, the study suggested that the Ugandan government enacts the current energy light bulb bill and also extends efficient light bulb subsidies to all households. Keywords: Energy efficiency, efficient light bulbs, determinants, adoption, household

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vaugeois, Courtney; Hobkirk, Mandy; Vince, Brad; Gould, Victoria; Sakaki, Graham;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    This pilot project worked to review how the Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region (MABR) is contributing to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the local level. It is crucial that the SDGs are met locally, nationally, and internationally to achieve a sustainable future for all. Through a qualitative approach, this study explored the how groups within the region are contributing to each Goal. Results found that each of the 17 SDGs are being contributed to in the MABR, though some Goals, including Goal 15, receive more support than others. Colleges & Institutes Canada https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24064/1-GettingToKnowTheSDGs.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christina E. Hoicka; Runa Das; Yuxu Zhao; Maria-Louise McMaster; Jenny Lieu; Susan Morrissey Wyse;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Countries: United Kingdom, Netherlands, Canada
    Project: SSHRC

    The rapid diffusion of demand-side low-carbon innovations has been identified as a key strategy for maintaining average global temperature rise at or below 1.5 °C. Diffusion research tends to focus on a single sector, or single technology case study, and on a small scope of factors that influence innovation diffusion. This paper describes a novel methodology for identifying multiple demand-side innovations within a specific energy system context and for characterizing their impact on socio-technical energy systems. This research employs several theoretical frameworks that include the Energy Technology Innovation System (ETIS) framework to develop a sample of innovations; the Sustainability Transitions framework to code innovations for their potential to impact the socio-technical system; the energy justice framework to identify the potential of innovations to address aspects of justice; and how characteristics of innovations are relevant to Innovation Adoption. This coding and conceptualization creates the foundation for the future development of quantitative models to empirically assess and quantify the rate of low-carbon innovation diffusion as well as understanding the broader relationship between the diffusion of innovations and socio-technical system change. The three stages of research are: •Contextualization: surveys and desk research to identify low-carbon innovations across the ETIS; •Decontextualization: the development of a codebook of variables •Recontextualization: coding the innovations and analysis. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license. The version of record is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mex.2021.101295.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barraclough, Alicia Donnellan; Måren, Ingel Elisabeth; MAB Youth Consortia;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    Sustainable development has at his heart the mission to make our planet a life-sustaining place for future generations. Young stakeholders are key to sustainability transformations, both as active participants that push them forward but also as actors vulnerable to being left behind. As testing sites for sustainable development, Biosphere Reserves (BRs) are home to millions of young people in over 124 countries. Very little research or knowledge exists on how young people experience living in BRs, how they contribute towards BRs’ goals, or how they see BRs moving forward under global change. To increase young stakeholder’s visibility and inclusion in the MAB programme, UNESCO-MAB has organized two MAB Youth Forums attended by over 300 youth, one in Italy in 2017 and one in China in 2019. Here we present a short commentary on what we believe were the main take-away’s generated during these events and the research that followed them. Firstly, we present a research note of the first global-level study on young stakeholder’s perspectives of BR implementation, discussing a thematic analysis of the results generated during the MAB-Youth Forum workshops and surveys. Secondly, we present an overview of the “MAB Youth Declaration”, a collaborative text which was generated over the course of four days and which distils the main messages young people living in BRs wish to convey to the MAB community and beyond. Our paper highlights the important role young stakeholders play in BRs, whose understandings reflect the social, economic and ecological complexity in which BRs are embedded. Their concerns span a diversity of topics, from the relevance of fair conservation practices and respect for biocultural diversity, to the importance of sustainable livelihood opportunities and fair youth representation in decisionmaking bodies. Thus, we highlight research findings on the need to increase young stakeholder integration and participation within environmental governance. Finally, we urge the BR research community to practice youth-inclusive research that helps generate knowledge to support evidence-based decision making in BRs. The main author’s (ADB) travel to the MAB Youth Forum 2019 was funded by UNESCO Office Beijing and her position at the UiB UNESCO Chair is funded by the University of Bergen. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24067/4-SpotlightOnYouth.pdf?sequence=3

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The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
5 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Publication . Article . 2021 . Embargo End Date: 12 Aug 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Susan Morrissey Wyse; Runa Das; Christina E. Hoicka; Yuxu Zhao; Maria-Louise McMaster;
    Publisher: Frontiers Media
    Country: Canada

    The diffusion of low-carbon innovations, including innovative products and services, is required to accelerate a low-carbon energy transition. These innovations also have the potential to alleviate and perpetuate existing social inequities, calling into question their “justness.” Energy justice is a useful analytical tool for framing justice questions related to energy. In this paper, we ask whether demand-side low-carbon energy innovations are meeting energy justice criteria. To address this question, this study develops four indicators from existing energy justice frameworks and applies them to a range of demand-side innovations offered to energy users in Ontario. The indicators are used to assess innovation availability, affordability, information, and involvement. Innovations were identified using surveys and desk research across Ontario's energy technology innovation system (ETIS). One hundred twenty-two innovations are analyzed for these four indicators, and according to intended innovation users and innovation providers. Findings suggest that three of the four indicators—availability, affordability and information are broadly being addressed, while involvement was more difficult to establish. However, the ETIS may be perpetuating inequities through an over emphasis of innovations for particular energy users, such as private businesses, alongside under-emphasis on potentially marginalized actors, such as low-income households and renters. Furthermore, government-delivered, publicly owned or regulated innovation providers place a greater emphasis on energy justice, including the provision of innovations for marginalized actors. This study aids our understanding of energy justice in low-carbon energy innovations and is critical given that in the context of funding cuts to public services, there may be an increased reliance on decentralized actors. The consideration of justice gaps that emerge through such decentralization should not be overlooked. Our findings suggest that within Ontario's ETIS, who provides innovations matters. Given the insights presented in this study, this research approach and the developed indicators could be applied to other contexts and socio-technical systems. The application of energy justice indicators, derived from existing scholarship, therefore presents an important opportunity to address current and understudied practical energy challenges. Citation: Wyse SM, Das RR, Hoicka CE, Zhao Y and McMaster M-L (2021) Investigating Energy Justice in Demand-Side Low-Carbon Innovations in Ontario. Front. Sustain. Cities 3:633122. doi: 10.3389/frsc.2021.633122 Copyright © 2021 Wyse, Das, Hoicka, Zhao and McMaster. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0). First publication by Frontiers Media. The definitive version of record is available at https://doi.org/10.3389/frsc.2021.633122

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tugaine, Annet;
    Country: Canada

    Energy is the dominant climate change contributor accounting for around 60% of total global gas emissions. Given the growing concerns and complexities associated with climate change, most countries worldwide have committed to delivering clean energy. One way to attain this is to invest in energy-efficient technologies such as efficient light bulb technologies. This study’s question was; what determines households’ energy efficiency light bulb adoption in Kiwatule? The main objective of this study was to investigate the behaviour and attitudes of households adopting energy-efficient light bulbs in Kiwatule. The research findings indicated financial motivation as the major determinant of efficient light bulb adoption. To facilitate this, the study suggested that the Ugandan government enacts the current energy light bulb bill and also extends efficient light bulb subsidies to all households. Keywords: Energy efficiency, efficient light bulbs, determinants, adoption, household

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Vaugeois, Courtney; Hobkirk, Mandy; Vince, Brad; Gould, Victoria; Sakaki, Graham;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    This pilot project worked to review how the Mount Arrowsmith Biosphere Region (MABR) is contributing to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the local level. It is crucial that the SDGs are met locally, nationally, and internationally to achieve a sustainable future for all. Through a qualitative approach, this study explored the how groups within the region are contributing to each Goal. Results found that each of the 17 SDGs are being contributed to in the MABR, though some Goals, including Goal 15, receive more support than others. Colleges & Institutes Canada https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24064/1-GettingToKnowTheSDGs.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Christina E. Hoicka; Runa Das; Yuxu Zhao; Maria-Louise McMaster; Jenny Lieu; Susan Morrissey Wyse;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Countries: United Kingdom, Netherlands, Canada
    Project: SSHRC

    The rapid diffusion of demand-side low-carbon innovations has been identified as a key strategy for maintaining average global temperature rise at or below 1.5 °C. Diffusion research tends to focus on a single sector, or single technology case study, and on a small scope of factors that influence innovation diffusion. This paper describes a novel methodology for identifying multiple demand-side innovations within a specific energy system context and for characterizing their impact on socio-technical energy systems. This research employs several theoretical frameworks that include the Energy Technology Innovation System (ETIS) framework to develop a sample of innovations; the Sustainability Transitions framework to code innovations for their potential to impact the socio-technical system; the energy justice framework to identify the potential of innovations to address aspects of justice; and how characteristics of innovations are relevant to Innovation Adoption. This coding and conceptualization creates the foundation for the future development of quantitative models to empirically assess and quantify the rate of low-carbon innovation diffusion as well as understanding the broader relationship between the diffusion of innovations and socio-technical system change. The three stages of research are: •Contextualization: surveys and desk research to identify low-carbon innovations across the ETIS; •Decontextualization: the development of a codebook of variables •Recontextualization: coding the innovations and analysis. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license. The version of record is available at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mex.2021.101295.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Barraclough, Alicia Donnellan; Måren, Ingel Elisabeth; MAB Youth Consortia;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    Sustainable development has at his heart the mission to make our planet a life-sustaining place for future generations. Young stakeholders are key to sustainability transformations, both as active participants that push them forward but also as actors vulnerable to being left behind. As testing sites for sustainable development, Biosphere Reserves (BRs) are home to millions of young people in over 124 countries. Very little research or knowledge exists on how young people experience living in BRs, how they contribute towards BRs’ goals, or how they see BRs moving forward under global change. To increase young stakeholder’s visibility and inclusion in the MAB programme, UNESCO-MAB has organized two MAB Youth Forums attended by over 300 youth, one in Italy in 2017 and one in China in 2019. Here we present a short commentary on what we believe were the main take-away’s generated during these events and the research that followed them. Firstly, we present a research note of the first global-level study on young stakeholder’s perspectives of BR implementation, discussing a thematic analysis of the results generated during the MAB-Youth Forum workshops and surveys. Secondly, we present an overview of the “MAB Youth Declaration”, a collaborative text which was generated over the course of four days and which distils the main messages young people living in BRs wish to convey to the MAB community and beyond. Our paper highlights the important role young stakeholders play in BRs, whose understandings reflect the social, economic and ecological complexity in which BRs are embedded. Their concerns span a diversity of topics, from the relevance of fair conservation practices and respect for biocultural diversity, to the importance of sustainable livelihood opportunities and fair youth representation in decisionmaking bodies. Thus, we highlight research findings on the need to increase young stakeholder integration and participation within environmental governance. Finally, we urge the BR research community to practice youth-inclusive research that helps generate knowledge to support evidence-based decision making in BRs. The main author’s (ADB) travel to the MAB Youth Forum 2019 was funded by UNESCO Office Beijing and her position at the UiB UNESCO Chair is funded by the University of Bergen. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/24067/4-SpotlightOnYouth.pdf?sequence=3