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419 Research products, page 1 of 42

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meixiu Yu; Daqing Yang; Xiaolong Liu; Qiongfang Li; Guoqing Wang;
    Publisher: MDPI AG
    Country: Netherlands

    Dam building and reservoir operations alter the downstream hydrological regime, and as a result, affect the health of the river aquatic ecosystem, particularly for large-scale cascade reservoirs. This study investigated the impact of the Gezhouba Reservoir (GR) and the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) on the spawning conditions of two critical taxa, i.e., the endemic four major carps and the endangered Chinese sturgeon in the Yangtze River. We analyzed the flow, sediment, and thermal regime in these two taxa spawning seasons and compared their features between the predam and postdam periods. Our results revealed that the GR and the TGR had altered the frequency distributions of flow, sediment, and water temperature to different degrees, with the impact by the GR on the carps and Chinese sturgeon ranked as water temperature > water temperature. For the GR, the satisfying degree of the suitable flow and water temperature of the carps increased, whilst the suitable flow, sediment, and water temperature for the Chinese sturgeon decreased. These changes in TGR showed a significant ascending (descending) trend in the suitable flow (water temperature) for the carps, and a clear decreasing trend in the flow, sediment, and temperature for Chinese sturgeon. Both the TGR and the GR had negative impacts on the spawning of these two taxa in terms of the rising/falling flow characteristics. flow, and the effect of the TGR on these two taxa were ordered as flow > water temperature, sediment > water temperature > flow, sediment > flow >

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ben Vandermeer; Ingeborg van der Tweel; Marijke C. Jansen-van der Weide; Stephanie S. Weinreich; Despina G. Contopoulos-Ioannidis; Dirk Bassler; Ricardo M. Fernandes; Lisa M. Askie; Haroon Saloojee; Paola Baiardi; +2 more
    Countries: Switzerland, Netherlands, Netherlands, Netherlands
    Project: EC | GRIP (261060), NWO | Blue Action (32188)

    Background: We wished to compare the nuisance parameters of pediatric vs. adult randomized-trials (RCTs) and determine if the latter can be used in sample size computations of the former.Methods: In this meta-epidemiologic empirical evaluation we examined meta-analyses from the Cochrane Database of Systematic-Reviews, with at least one pediatric-RCT and at least one adult-RCT. Within each meta-analysis of binary efficacy-outcomes, we calculated the pooled-control-group event-rate (CER) across separately all pediatric and adult-trials, using random-effect models and subsequently calculated the control-group event-rate risk-ratio (CER-RR) of the pooled-pediatric-CERs vs. adult-CERs. Within each meta-analysis with continuous outcomes we calculated the pooled-control-group effect standard deviation (CE-SD) across separately all pediatric and adult-trials and subsequently calculated the CE-SD-ratio of the pooled-pediatric-CE-SDs vs. adult-CE-SDs. We then calculated across all meta-analyses the pooled-CER-RRs and pooled-CE-SD-ratios (primary endpoints) and the pooled-magnitude of effect-sizes of CER-RRs and CE-SD-ratios using REMs. A ratio < 1 indicates that pediatric trials have smaller nuisance parameters than adult trials.Results: We analyzed 208 meta-analyses (135 for binary-outcomes, 73 for continuous-outcomes). For binary outcomes, pediatric-RCTs had on average 10% smaller CERs than adult-RCTs (summary-CE-RR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.98). For mortality outcomes the summary-CE-RR was 0.48 (95% CIs: 0.31, 0.74). For continuous outcomes, pediatric-RCTs had on average 26% smaller CE-SDs than adult-RCTs (summary-CE-SD-ratio: 0.74).Conclusions: Clinically relevant differences in nuisance parameters between pediatric and adult trials were detected. These differences have implications for design of future studies. Extrapolation of nuisance parameters for sample-sizes calculations from adult-trials to pediatric-trials should be cautiously done.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2016
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Edeline Gagnon; Anne Bruneau; Colin E. Hughes; Luciano Paganucci de Queiroz; Gwilym P. Lewis;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: NSERC

    Abstract The Caesalpinia group is a large pantropical clade of ca. 205 species in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Leguminosae) in which generic delimitation has been in a state of considerable flux. Here we present new phylogenetic analyses based on five plastid and one nuclear ribosomal marker, with dense taxon sampling including 172 (84%) of the species and representatives of all previously described genera in the Caesalpinia group. These analyses show that the current classification of the Caesalpinia group into 21 genera needs to be revised. Several genera (Poincianella, Erythrostemon, Cenostigma and Caesalpinia sensu Lewis, 2005) are non-monophyletic and several previously unclassified Asian species segregate into clades that merit recognition at generic rank. In addition, the near-completeness of our taxon sampling identifies three species that do not belong in any of the main clades and these are recognised as new monospecific genera. A new generic classification of the Caesalpinia group is presented including a key for the identification of genera, full generic descriptions, illustrations (drawings and photo plates of all genera), and (for most genera) the nomenclatural transfer of species to their correct genus. We recognise 26 genera, with reinstatement of two previously described genera (Biancaea Tod., Denisophytum R. Vig.), re-delimitation and expansion of several others (Moullava, Cenostigma, Libidibia and Erythrostemon), contraction of Caesalpinia s.s. and description of four new ones (Gelrebia, Paubrasilia, Hererolandia and Hultholia), and make 75 new nomenclatural combinations in this new generic system.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Maxime Lobry; Médéric Loyez; Karima Chah; Eman M. Hassan; Erik Goormaghtigh; Maria C. DeRosa; Ruddy Wattiez; Christophe Caucheteur;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: Belgium, Canada

    In the biomedical detection context, plasmonic tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) have been demonstrated to be a very accurate and sensitive sensing tool, especially well-adapted for biochemical detection. In this work, we have developed an aptasensor following a triple strategy to improve the overall sensing performances and robustness. Single polarization fiber (SPF) is used as biosensor substrate while the demodulation is based on tracking a peculiar feature of the lower envelope of the cladding mode resonances spectrum. This method is highly sensitive and yields wavelength shifts several tens of times higher than the ones reported so far based on the tracking of individual modes of the spectrum. An amplification of the response is further performed through a sandwich assay by the use of specific antibodies. These improvements have been achieved on a biosensor developed for the detection of the HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2) protein, a relevant breast cancer biomarker. These advanced developments can be very interesting for point-of-care biomedical measurements in a convenient practical way.

  • Publication . Conference object . Presentation . Other literature type . 2005
    Open Access

    In order for middleware systems to be adaptive, their properties and services need to support a wide variety of application-specific policies. However, application developers and administrators should not be expected to cope with complex policy languages and evaluation engines or to develop custom engines from scratch. In this paper, we discuss the benefits of policy engines designed as component frameworks with a mix of parameterized pre-built and custom logic composed to implement complex policies. To provide an example of such a design approach, we present an authorization architecture for ASP.NET Web services that has been implemented in a real-world system.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mélanie Wary; Frédérique Eynaud; Didier Swingedouw; Valérie Masson-Delmotte; Jens Matthiessen; Catherine Kissel; Jena Zumaque; Linda Rossignol; Jean Jouzel;
    Countries: Germany, France
    Project: EC | PAST4FUTURE (243908), ANR | GREENLAND (ANR-10-CEPL-0008)

    Abstract. Dansgaard–Oeschger oscillations constitute one of the most enigmatic features of the last glacial cycle. Their cold atmospheric phases have been commonly associated with cold sea-surface temperatures and expansion of sea ice in the North Atlantic and adjacent seas. Here, based on dinocyst analyses from the 48–30 ka interval of four sediment cores from the northern Northeast Atlantic and southern Norwegian Sea, we provide direct and quantitative evidence of a regional paradoxical seesaw pattern: cold Greenland and North Atlantic phases coincide with warmer sea-surface conditions and shorter seasonal sea-ice cover durations in the Norwegian Sea as compared to warm phases. Combined with additional palaeorecords and multi-model hosing simulations, our results suggest that during cold Greenland phases, reduced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and cold North Atlantic sea-surface conditions were accompanied by the subsurface propagation of warm Atlantic waters that re-emerged in the Nordic Seas and provided moisture towards Greenland summit.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    H.E. James Hammond; Sergio García-Tejero; Greg R. Pohl; David W. Langor; John R. Spence;
    Publisher: Pensoft Publishers
    Country: United States

    Epigaeic beetle assemblages were surveyed using continuous pitfall trapping during the summers of 1992 and 1993 in six widely geographically distributed locations in Alberta’s aspen-mixedwood forests prior to initial forest harvest. Species composition and turnover (β-diversity) were evaluated on several spatial scales ranging from Natural Regions (distance between samples 120–420 km) to pitfall traps (40–60 m). A total of 19,885 ground beetles (Carabidae) representing 40 species and 12,669 rove beetles (non-AleocharinaeStaphylinidae) representing 78 species was collected. Beetle catch, species richness, and diversity differed significantly among the six locations, as did the identity of dominant species. Beetle species composition differed significantly between the Boreal Forest and Foothills Natural Regions for both taxa. Staphylinidae β-diversity differed significantly between Natural Regions, whereas Carabidae β-diversity differed among locations. Climate variables such as number of frost-free days, dry periods, and mean summer temperatures were identified as significant factors influencing beetle assemblages at coarse spatial scales, whereas over- and understory vegetation cover, litter depth, shade, slope, and stand age influenced beetle assemblages at finer spatial scales. Significant interannual variation in assemblage structure was noted for both taxa. Because composition of epigaeic beetle assemblages differed across spatial scales, forest management strategies based only on generalized understanding of a single location will be ineffective as conservation measures. In addition, site history and geographic variation significantly affect species distributions of these two beetle families across the landscape. Thus, we underscore Terry Erwin’s suggestion that biodiversity assessments focused on species assemblages at different spatial scales provide a sound approach for understanding biodiversity change and enhancing conservation of arthropod biodiversity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frédéric Louis François Babonneau; Olivier Bahn; Alain Haurie; Marc Vielle;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: NSERC , EC | PARIS REINFORCE (820846)

    In this paper, we propose a simple oligopoly game model to represent the interactions between coalitions of countries in deploying carbon dioxide removal (CDR) strategies in a steady-state net-zero emission climate regime that could take place by the end of the twenty-first century. The emission quotas and CDR activities obtained in the solution of this steady-state model could then be used as a target for end-of-period conditions in a dynamic integrated assessment analysis studying the transition to 2100. More precisely, we analyze a steady-state situation where m coalitions exist and behave as m players in a game of supplying emission rights on an international emission trading system. The quotas supplied by a coalition must correspond to the amount of CO2 captured through CDR activities in the corresponding world region. We use an extension of the computable general equilibrium model GEMINI-E3 to calibrate the payoff functions and compute an equilibrium solution in the noncooperative game.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lesley Ann Saketkoo; Reuben Escorpizo; Kevin J. Keen; Kim Fligelstone; Oliver Distler;
    Country: Switzerland

    Objectives. To outline rationale and potential strategies for rheumatology experts to be able to develop disease-specific Core Sets under the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). ICF is a universal framework introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO) to describe and quantify the impact and burden on functioning of health conditions associated with impairment/disability. Methods. A combined effort of the EULAR Scleroderma Clinical Trial and Research and the ICF Research Branch was initiated to develop an ICF language for scleroderma. From our Medline literature review, using the abbreviation and spelled out version of ICF, we assembled approaches and methodological reasoning for steps of core set development. Results. The ICF can be used for patient care and policy-making, as well as the provision of resources, services and funding. The ICF is used on institutional, regional, national and global levels. Several diseases now have ICF Core Sets. Patients with complex rheumatologic diseases will benefit from a disease-specific ICF Core Set and should be included in all stages of development. ICF Core Set development for rheumatic diseases can be conducted from a number of feasible strategies. Conclusion. This overview should help to clarify useful processes leading to development of an ICF Core Set, and also provide a platform for expert groups considering such an endeavour.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Esling, Philippe; Bazin, Theis; Bitton, Adrien; Carsault, Tristan; Devis, Ninon;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: France
    Project: SSHRC

    Current state-of-the-art results in Music Information Retrieval are largely dominated by deep learning approaches. These provide unprecedented accuracy across all tasks. However, the consistently overlooked downside of these models is their stunningly massive complexity, which seems concomitantly crucial to their success. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a model pruning method based on the lottery ticket hypothesis. We modify the original approach to allow for explicitly removing parameters, through structured trimming of entire units, instead of simply masking individual weights. This leads to models which are effectively lighter in terms of size, memory and number of operations. We show that our proposal can remove up to 90% of the model parameters without loss of accuracy, leading to ultra-light deep MIR models. We confirm the surprising result that, at smaller compression ratios (removing up to 85% of a network), lighter models consistently outperform their heavier counterparts. We exhibit these results on a large array of MIR tasks including audio classification, pitch recognition, chord extraction, drum transcription and onset estimation. The resulting ultra-light deep learning models for MIR can run on CPU, and can even fit on embedded devices with minimal degradation of accuracy. 8 pages, 2 figures. 21st International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference 11-15 October 2020, Montreal, Canada

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Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
419 Research products, page 1 of 42
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Meixiu Yu; Daqing Yang; Xiaolong Liu; Qiongfang Li; Guoqing Wang;
    Publisher: MDPI AG
    Country: Netherlands

    Dam building and reservoir operations alter the downstream hydrological regime, and as a result, affect the health of the river aquatic ecosystem, particularly for large-scale cascade reservoirs. This study investigated the impact of the Gezhouba Reservoir (GR) and the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) on the spawning conditions of two critical taxa, i.e., the endemic four major carps and the endangered Chinese sturgeon in the Yangtze River. We analyzed the flow, sediment, and thermal regime in these two taxa spawning seasons and compared their features between the predam and postdam periods. Our results revealed that the GR and the TGR had altered the frequency distributions of flow, sediment, and water temperature to different degrees, with the impact by the GR on the carps and Chinese sturgeon ranked as water temperature > water temperature. For the GR, the satisfying degree of the suitable flow and water temperature of the carps increased, whilst the suitable flow, sediment, and water temperature for the Chinese sturgeon decreased. These changes in TGR showed a significant ascending (descending) trend in the suitable flow (water temperature) for the carps, and a clear decreasing trend in the flow, sediment, and temperature for Chinese sturgeon. Both the TGR and the GR had negative impacts on the spawning of these two taxa in terms of the rising/falling flow characteristics. flow, and the effect of the TGR on these two taxa were ordered as flow > water temperature, sediment > water temperature > flow, sediment > flow >

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ben Vandermeer; Ingeborg van der Tweel; Marijke C. Jansen-van der Weide; Stephanie S. Weinreich; Despina G. Contopoulos-Ioannidis; Dirk Bassler; Ricardo M. Fernandes; Lisa M. Askie; Haroon Saloojee; Paola Baiardi; +2 more
    Countries: Switzerland, Netherlands, Netherlands, Netherlands
    Project: EC | GRIP (261060), NWO | Blue Action (32188)

    Background: We wished to compare the nuisance parameters of pediatric vs. adult randomized-trials (RCTs) and determine if the latter can be used in sample size computations of the former.Methods: In this meta-epidemiologic empirical evaluation we examined meta-analyses from the Cochrane Database of Systematic-Reviews, with at least one pediatric-RCT and at least one adult-RCT. Within each meta-analysis of binary efficacy-outcomes, we calculated the pooled-control-group event-rate (CER) across separately all pediatric and adult-trials, using random-effect models and subsequently calculated the control-group event-rate risk-ratio (CER-RR) of the pooled-pediatric-CERs vs. adult-CERs. Within each meta-analysis with continuous outcomes we calculated the pooled-control-group effect standard deviation (CE-SD) across separately all pediatric and adult-trials and subsequently calculated the CE-SD-ratio of the pooled-pediatric-CE-SDs vs. adult-CE-SDs. We then calculated across all meta-analyses the pooled-CER-RRs and pooled-CE-SD-ratios (primary endpoints) and the pooled-magnitude of effect-sizes of CER-RRs and CE-SD-ratios using REMs. A ratio < 1 indicates that pediatric trials have smaller nuisance parameters than adult trials.Results: We analyzed 208 meta-analyses (135 for binary-outcomes, 73 for continuous-outcomes). For binary outcomes, pediatric-RCTs had on average 10% smaller CERs than adult-RCTs (summary-CE-RR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.98). For mortality outcomes the summary-CE-RR was 0.48 (95% CIs: 0.31, 0.74). For continuous outcomes, pediatric-RCTs had on average 26% smaller CE-SDs than adult-RCTs (summary-CE-SD-ratio: 0.74).Conclusions: Clinically relevant differences in nuisance parameters between pediatric and adult trials were detected. These differences have implications for design of future studies. Extrapolation of nuisance parameters for sample-sizes calculations from adult-trials to pediatric-trials should be cautiously done.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2016
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Edeline Gagnon; Anne Bruneau; Colin E. Hughes; Luciano Paganucci de Queiroz; Gwilym P. Lewis;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: NSERC

    Abstract The Caesalpinia group is a large pantropical clade of ca. 205 species in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Leguminosae) in which generic delimitation has been in a state of considerable flux. Here we present new phylogenetic analyses based on five plastid and one nuclear ribosomal marker, with dense taxon sampling including 172 (84%) of the species and representatives of all previously described genera in the Caesalpinia group. These analyses show that the current classification of the Caesalpinia group into 21 genera needs to be revised. Several genera (Poincianella, Erythrostemon, Cenostigma and Caesalpinia sensu Lewis, 2005) are non-monophyletic and several previously unclassified Asian species segregate into clades that merit recognition at generic rank. In addition, the near-completeness of our taxon sampling identifies three species that do not belong in any of the main clades and these are recognised as new monospecific genera. A new generic classification of the Caesalpinia group is presented including a key for the identification of genera, full generic descriptions, illustrations (drawings and photo plates of all genera), and (for most genera) the nomenclatural transfer of species to their correct genus. We recognise 26 genera, with reinstatement of two previously described genera (Biancaea Tod., Denisophytum R. Vig.), re-delimitation and expansion of several others (Moullava, Cenostigma, Libidibia and Erythrostemon), contraction of Caesalpinia s.s. and description of four new ones (Gelrebia, Paubrasilia, Hererolandia and Hultholia), and make 75 new nomenclatural combinations in this new generic system.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Maxime Lobry; Médéric Loyez; Karima Chah; Eman M. Hassan; Erik Goormaghtigh; Maria C. DeRosa; Ruddy Wattiez; Christophe Caucheteur;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Countries: Belgium, Canada

    In the biomedical detection context, plasmonic tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) have been demonstrated to be a very accurate and sensitive sensing tool, especially well-adapted for biochemical detection. In this work, we have developed an aptasensor following a triple strategy to improve the overall sensing performances and robustness. Single polarization fiber (SPF) is used as biosensor substrate while the demodulation is based on tracking a peculiar feature of the lower envelope of the cladding mode resonances spectrum. This method is highly sensitive and yields wavelength shifts several tens of times higher than the ones reported so far based on the tracking of individual modes of the spectrum. An amplification of the response is further performed through a sandwich assay by the use of specific antibodies. These improvements have been achieved on a biosensor developed for the detection of the HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-2) protein, a relevant breast cancer biomarker. These advanced developments can be very interesting for point-of-care biomedical measurements in a convenient practical way.

  • Publication . Conference object . Presentation . Other literature type . 2005
    Open Access

    In order for middleware systems to be adaptive, their properties and services need to support a wide variety of application-specific policies. However, application developers and administrators should not be expected to cope with complex policy languages and evaluation engines or to develop custom engines from scratch. In this paper, we discuss the benefits of policy engines designed as component frameworks with a mix of parameterized pre-built and custom logic composed to implement complex policies. To provide an example of such a design approach, we present an authorization architecture for ASP.NET Web services that has been implemented in a real-world system.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mélanie Wary; Frédérique Eynaud; Didier Swingedouw; Valérie Masson-Delmotte; Jens Matthiessen; Catherine Kissel; Jena Zumaque; Linda Rossignol; Jean Jouzel;
    Countries: Germany, France
    Project: EC | PAST4FUTURE (243908), ANR | GREENLAND (ANR-10-CEPL-0008)

    Abstract. Dansgaard–Oeschger oscillations constitute one of the most enigmatic features of the last glacial cycle. Their cold atmospheric phases have been commonly associated with cold sea-surface temperatures and expansion of sea ice in the North Atlantic and adjacent seas. Here, based on dinocyst analyses from the 48–30 ka interval of four sediment cores from the northern Northeast Atlantic and southern Norwegian Sea, we provide direct and quantitative evidence of a regional paradoxical seesaw pattern: cold Greenland and North Atlantic phases coincide with warmer sea-surface conditions and shorter seasonal sea-ice cover durations in the Norwegian Sea as compared to warm phases. Combined with additional palaeorecords and multi-model hosing simulations, our results suggest that during cold Greenland phases, reduced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and cold North Atlantic sea-surface conditions were accompanied by the subsurface propagation of warm Atlantic waters that re-emerged in the Nordic Seas and provided moisture towards Greenland summit.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    H.E. James Hammond; Sergio García-Tejero; Greg R. Pohl; David W. Langor; John R. Spence;
    Publisher: Pensoft Publishers
    Country: United States

    Epigaeic beetle assemblages were surveyed using continuous pitfall trapping during the summers of 1992 and 1993 in six widely geographically distributed locations in Alberta’s aspen-mixedwood forests prior to initial forest harvest. Species composition and turnover (β-diversity) were evaluated on several spatial scales ranging from Natural Regions (distance between samples 120–420 km) to pitfall traps (40–60 m). A total of 19,885 ground beetles (Carabidae) representing 40 species and 12,669 rove beetles (non-AleocharinaeStaphylinidae) representing 78 species was collected. Beetle catch, species richness, and diversity differed significantly among the six locations, as did the identity of dominant species. Beetle species composition differed significantly between the Boreal Forest and Foothills Natural Regions for both taxa. Staphylinidae β-diversity differed significantly between Natural Regions, whereas Carabidae β-diversity differed among locations. Climate variables such as number of frost-free days, dry periods, and mean summer temperatures were identified as significant factors influencing beetle assemblages at coarse spatial scales, whereas over- and understory vegetation cover, litter depth, shade, slope, and stand age influenced beetle assemblages at finer spatial scales. Significant interannual variation in assemblage structure was noted for both taxa. Because composition of epigaeic beetle assemblages differed across spatial scales, forest management strategies based only on generalized understanding of a single location will be ineffective as conservation measures. In addition, site history and geographic variation significantly affect species distributions of these two beetle families across the landscape. Thus, we underscore Terry Erwin’s suggestion that biodiversity assessments focused on species assemblages at different spatial scales provide a sound approach for understanding biodiversity change and enhancing conservation of arthropod biodiversity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Frédéric Louis François Babonneau; Olivier Bahn; Alain Haurie; Marc Vielle;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: NSERC , EC | PARIS REINFORCE (820846)

    In this paper, we propose a simple oligopoly game model to represent the interactions between coalitions of countries in deploying carbon dioxide removal (CDR) strategies in a steady-state net-zero emission climate regime that could take place by the end of the twenty-first century. The emission quotas and CDR activities obtained in the solution of this steady-state model could then be used as a target for end-of-period conditions in a dynamic integrated assessment analysis studying the transition to 2100. More precisely, we analyze a steady-state situation where m coalitions exist and behave as m players in a game of supplying emission rights on an international emission trading system. The quotas supplied by a coalition must correspond to the amount of CO2 captured through CDR activities in the corresponding world region. We use an extension of the computable general equilibrium model GEMINI-E3 to calibrate the payoff functions and compute an equilibrium solution in the noncooperative game.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lesley Ann Saketkoo; Reuben Escorpizo; Kevin J. Keen; Kim Fligelstone; Oliver Distler;
    Country: Switzerland

    Objectives. To outline rationale and potential strategies for rheumatology experts to be able to develop disease-specific Core Sets under the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). ICF is a universal framework introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO) to describe and quantify the impact and burden on functioning of health conditions associated with impairment/disability. Methods. A combined effort of the EULAR Scleroderma Clinical Trial and Research and the ICF Research Branch was initiated to develop an ICF language for scleroderma. From our Medline literature review, using the abbreviation and spelled out version of ICF, we assembled approaches and methodological reasoning for steps of core set development. Results. The ICF can be used for patient care and policy-making, as well as the provision of resources, services and funding. The ICF is used on institutional, regional, national and global levels. Several diseases now have ICF Core Sets. Patients with complex rheumatologic diseases will benefit from a disease-specific ICF Core Set and should be included in all stages of development. ICF Core Set development for rheumatic diseases can be conducted from a number of feasible strategies. Conclusion. This overview should help to clarify useful processes leading to development of an ICF Core Set, and also provide a platform for expert groups considering such an endeavour.

  • Publication . Article . Conference object . Preprint . 2020
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Esling, Philippe; Bazin, Theis; Bitton, Adrien; Carsault, Tristan; Devis, Ninon;
    Publisher: Zenodo
    Country: France
    Project: SSHRC

    Current state-of-the-art results in Music Information Retrieval are largely dominated by deep learning approaches. These provide unprecedented accuracy across all tasks. However, the consistently overlooked downside of these models is their stunningly massive complexity, which seems concomitantly crucial to their success. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a model pruning method based on the lottery ticket hypothesis. We modify the original approach to allow for explicitly removing parameters, through structured trimming of entire units, instead of simply masking individual weights. This leads to models which are effectively lighter in terms of size, memory and number of operations. We show that our proposal can remove up to 90% of the model parameters without loss of accuracy, leading to ultra-light deep MIR models. We confirm the surprising result that, at smaller compression ratios (removing up to 85% of a network), lighter models consistently outperform their heavier counterparts. We exhibit these results on a large array of MIR tasks including audio classification, pitch recognition, chord extraction, drum transcription and onset estimation. The resulting ultra-light deep learning models for MIR can run on CPU, and can even fit on embedded devices with minimal degradation of accuracy. 8 pages, 2 figures. 21st International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference 11-15 October 2020, Montreal, Canada