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2,966 Research products, page 1 of 297

  • Canada
  • 2021-2021
  • Open Access
  • Scholarship@Western

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brett Plouffe; Tamara Van Hooren; Michelle Barton; Michelle Barton; Nancy Nashid; Erkan Demirkaya; Erkan Demirkaya; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; +8 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Canada

    Renal infarction is a rare finding in children. Associations between SARS-CoV-2 infections and thromboembolic events including renal infarcts have been described in adults. Although a similar association in children has not yet been described with this pandemic, the pediatric literature is still evolving with the recognition of new manifestations including the post-infectious Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). We report the rare event of multiple renal infarcts in a 6-year-old boy manifesting several features of MIS-C 9 weeks following a self-limiting febrile illness characteristic of COVID-19. An underlying Factor V Leiden mutation was identified in this child but felt to be insufficient on its own to explain his clinical presentation. As SARS-CoV-2 testing was delayed, the failure to identify viral RNA or antibodies may not exclude the virus' potential role in precipitating the infarct in this host. Given that renal infarcts have been described in adult patients with COVID-19, reporting this perplexing case where SARS-CoV-2 may have played a role, may help identify this potential complication.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arsenault, Andrew;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    This study examined the connection between social status and mummification in post-New Kingdom Egypt using a sample of sixty-one (n=61) adult non-royal Egyptian human mummies archived in the IMPACT radiological database. The purpose of this research was two-fold. First, as they have been uncritically accepted by both the academic community and popular literature, the validity of Classical mummification accounts offered by Herodotus and Diodorus Siculus was assessed. Second, four features of mummification with status connotations (arm position, amulets, cranial resin, estimated stature) were tested using exploratory data analysis in search of any potential connections with each other or specific time periods. The results of this study not only challenge the accuracy of Classical accounts discussing ancient Egyptian mummification but demonstrate that arm positioning and cranial resin have potential associations with specific time periods, geographic regions, and each other. Ultimately, following the democratization of mummification in the New Kingdom, this research highlights the inevitable variability of the mummification program in post-New Kingdom Egypt.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Goswami, Ketan;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Entrepreneurial actions, i.e., activities like hiring, marketing, financing, hustling (even bribing!), etc., requisite for building small businesses are less studied than antecedent opportunity recognition processes. The two most common form of contexts in which entrepreneurial actions are studied are opportunity-driven (Silicon-Valley type) and necessity-driven (poverty contexts). While there is a fair amount of research on community-based and band-driven Indigenous entrepreneurship, less is known about entrepreneurial actions by individual self-employed Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs in Canada/ Turtle Island. Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs face a differential set of obstacles in their pursuit for economic self-determination compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. This dissertation endeavours to understand entrepreneurial actions undertaken by individual Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs and their similarities and differences with dominant notions, more specifically the extant notions of opportunity-driven and necessity-driven entrepreneurial actions. I do so abductively by leveraging qualitative methods, in the context of Métis and First Nations self-employed entrepreneurs in the Canadian Prairies (more specifically, Saskatchewan). Findings highlight that the entrepreneurial actions of Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs differ compared to dominant notions along three dimensions, namely – motivation, liabilities, and the actions themselves. I submit that this has both theoretical and practical implications as my findings make a case for explicitly accounting for a role of self-regulatory coping and volition as foundational micro-components of entrepreneurial action, in addition to knowledge and motivation already prescribed in extant literature.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cheong, Ian;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada
  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sandwell, Rachel; Carline, Katie; Whitelaw, Diane;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Chair: Rachel Sandwell, McGill University Rachel Sandwell, McGill University (rachel.sandwell@gmail.com). “As powerful as an atom bomb”: Women’s Militant Politics in 1950s South Africa Katie Carline, Michigan State University (carlinek@msu.edu). Mothers on the move: women's organizations and the history of mobility in a South African township Diane Whitelaw, Queens University (16dew1@queensu.ca). Gender and Decolonization in Zambia

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lilian Maureen Nyatichi Kebaya; Dalton Wamalwa; Nyambura Kariuki; Bashir Admani; Philip Ayieko; Ruth Nduati;
    Publisher: BioMed Central
    Country: Canada

    Abstract Background HIV is a major contributor to infant mortality. A significant gap remains between the uptake of infant and maternal antiretroviral regimens and only a minority of HIV-exposed infants receives prophylaxis and safe infant feeding. Losses to follow-up of HIV-exposed infants are associated with shortcomings of facility-based PMTCT models with weak community support of linkages. Use of mobile phones offers an opportunity for improving care and promoting retention assessed by timely attendance of scheduled appointments for the mother-baby pairs and achievement of an HIV-free generation. The objective of this study was to compare self-reported adherence to infant Nevirapine (NVP) prophylaxis and retention in care assessed by timely attendance of scheduled appointments over 10 weeks in HIV exposed infants randomized to 2-weekly mobile phone calls (intervention) versus no phone calls (control). Methods In this open label randomized controlled study, one hundred and fifty HIV infected women drawn from 3 health facilities in Western Kenya and their infants were randomly assigned to receive either phone-based reminders on PMTCT messages or standard health care messages (no calls) within 24 h of delivery. Women in the intervention arm continued to receive fortnightly phone calls. At 6- and 10-weeks following randomization we collected data on infant adherence to Nevirapine, mode of infant feeding, early HIV testing and retention in care in both study arms. All analyses were intention to treat. Results At 6 weeks follow-up, 90.7% (n = 68) of participants receiving phone calls reported adherence to infant NVP prophylaxis, compared with 72% (n = 54) of participants in the control group (p = 0.005). Participants in the intervention arm were also significantly more likely to remain in care than participants in the control group [78.7% (n = 59) vs. 58.7% (n = 44), p = 0.009 at 6 weeks and 69.3% (n = 52) vs. 37.3% (n = 28), p < 0.001 at 10 weeks]. Conclusions These results suggest that phone calls are potentially an important tool to improve adherence to infant NVP prophylaxis and retention in care for HIV-exposed infants. Trial registration PACTR202007654729602. Registered 6 June 2018 - Retrospectively registered, https://pactr.samrc.ac.za/TrialDisplay.aspx?TrialID=3449

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Testing biceps (C5, C6 musculocutaneous nerve) reflex in the arm sitting with neurologist and medical student trainee present-no sound https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/neuro_reflexes/1005/thumbnail.jpg

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cui, QingXiao;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    This presentation covers two internships I undertook from July to September 2020 and October 2020 to February 2021: respectively, a website design internship with MikonoYetu and Western Heads East, and a promotional internship with the Single Women in Motherhood Training Program, or S.W.I.M. It discusses the duties I undertook on a team of other interns, the hard and soft skills I developed by branching out into fields I would not have on my own, the implications for my future career path, and the relevance of my SASAH education. It also discusses the remote nature of the internships and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as recommendations to other students and prospective interns.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fuya-Duenas, Sandra Rocio;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Coloquio entre dos Perros (Dialogue between two Dogs) is a comic chamber opera for four solo voices (one mezzo-soprano, one tenor and two baritones) and mixed ensemble (oboe, viola, guitar and percussion). The libretto, written in modern American Spanish, is based on the novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra entitled Coloquio que pasó entre Cipión y Berganza, perros del Hospital de la Resurrección, que está en la ciudad de Valladolid fuera de la puerta del campo, a quien comúnmente llaman los perros de Mahudes. The opera is divided into nine scenes, which relate the stories from the life of Berganza, a dog from Seville, who tells those stories to his friend and female dog, Scipiona. The music of the opera explores Messiaen's sixth mode of limited transpositions and its derived modes. Likewise, the music uses rhythmic techniques from traditional Colombian music and scales used in traditional Spanish music.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yamuragiye, Assumpta;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) is a care model in which different healthcare providers work together to achieve optimum patient outcomes. Ineffective IPC may lead to up to 70% of adverse events in obstetric care. In Rwanda, the need to reinforce effective IPC to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes was revealed following a maternal death audit conducted between 2009 and 2013. Also, in 2017, it was reported that 84% of maternal deaths were due to preventable causes, and 36% were due to delays within health facilities. To improve maternal and newborn care quality in Rwanda, the ‘Training Support Access Model for Maternal Newborn and Child Health’ (TSAM-MNCH) project initiated mentorship programs in 2017. The purpose of this study was to explore IPC experiences among obstetric and neonatal care team members who participated in mentorship to explore the barriers and benefits in implementing IPC. A qualitative descriptive case study design underpinned by a constructivism paradigm was used, semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-five healthcare provider mentees and five director generals of the five hospitals where mentorship was implemented. The findings suggest that in general participants were not satisfied with the current IPC practice, they mentioned several challenges dominated by power relation issues affecting communication. Another challenge was a stressful work environment characterized by insufficient staff, lack of necessary equipment, and lack of motivation. Participants suggested training on IPC and the availability of protocols and guidelines to guide the clinical practice. The participant reported benefits of the TSAM mentorship program, included an increase in self-confidence and awareness of their own responsibilities, which also contributed to an improved working relationship. The results from this study contribute to evidence for improvement in IPC practice. There is a need for policymakers, hospital managers, researchers, and health professional educators to create more systematic ways to improve IPC, including training on IPC and ensuring IPC remains on the health priority agenda. Future studies should identify the number of maternal and neonatal deaths caused by a failure in effective collaboration and strategies to sustain the improvements in practice as a result of mentorship programs.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,966 Research products, page 1 of 297
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brett Plouffe; Tamara Van Hooren; Michelle Barton; Michelle Barton; Nancy Nashid; Erkan Demirkaya; Erkan Demirkaya; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; +8 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Canada

    Renal infarction is a rare finding in children. Associations between SARS-CoV-2 infections and thromboembolic events including renal infarcts have been described in adults. Although a similar association in children has not yet been described with this pandemic, the pediatric literature is still evolving with the recognition of new manifestations including the post-infectious Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). We report the rare event of multiple renal infarcts in a 6-year-old boy manifesting several features of MIS-C 9 weeks following a self-limiting febrile illness characteristic of COVID-19. An underlying Factor V Leiden mutation was identified in this child but felt to be insufficient on its own to explain his clinical presentation. As SARS-CoV-2 testing was delayed, the failure to identify viral RNA or antibodies may not exclude the virus' potential role in precipitating the infarct in this host. Given that renal infarcts have been described in adult patients with COVID-19, reporting this perplexing case where SARS-CoV-2 may have played a role, may help identify this potential complication.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Arsenault, Andrew;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    This study examined the connection between social status and mummification in post-New Kingdom Egypt using a sample of sixty-one (n=61) adult non-royal Egyptian human mummies archived in the IMPACT radiological database. The purpose of this research was two-fold. First, as they have been uncritically accepted by both the academic community and popular literature, the validity of Classical mummification accounts offered by Herodotus and Diodorus Siculus was assessed. Second, four features of mummification with status connotations (arm position, amulets, cranial resin, estimated stature) were tested using exploratory data analysis in search of any potential connections with each other or specific time periods. The results of this study not only challenge the accuracy of Classical accounts discussing ancient Egyptian mummification but demonstrate that arm positioning and cranial resin have potential associations with specific time periods, geographic regions, and each other. Ultimately, following the democratization of mummification in the New Kingdom, this research highlights the inevitable variability of the mummification program in post-New Kingdom Egypt.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Goswami, Ketan;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Entrepreneurial actions, i.e., activities like hiring, marketing, financing, hustling (even bribing!), etc., requisite for building small businesses are less studied than antecedent opportunity recognition processes. The two most common form of contexts in which entrepreneurial actions are studied are opportunity-driven (Silicon-Valley type) and necessity-driven (poverty contexts). While there is a fair amount of research on community-based and band-driven Indigenous entrepreneurship, less is known about entrepreneurial actions by individual self-employed Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs in Canada/ Turtle Island. Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs face a differential set of obstacles in their pursuit for economic self-determination compared to their non-Indigenous counterparts. This dissertation endeavours to understand entrepreneurial actions undertaken by individual Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs and their similarities and differences with dominant notions, more specifically the extant notions of opportunity-driven and necessity-driven entrepreneurial actions. I do so abductively by leveraging qualitative methods, in the context of Métis and First Nations self-employed entrepreneurs in the Canadian Prairies (more specifically, Saskatchewan). Findings highlight that the entrepreneurial actions of Métis and First Nations entrepreneurs differ compared to dominant notions along three dimensions, namely – motivation, liabilities, and the actions themselves. I submit that this has both theoretical and practical implications as my findings make a case for explicitly accounting for a role of self-regulatory coping and volition as foundational micro-components of entrepreneurial action, in addition to knowledge and motivation already prescribed in extant literature.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cheong, Ian;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada
  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Sandwell, Rachel; Carline, Katie; Whitelaw, Diane;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Chair: Rachel Sandwell, McGill University Rachel Sandwell, McGill University (rachel.sandwell@gmail.com). “As powerful as an atom bomb”: Women’s Militant Politics in 1950s South Africa Katie Carline, Michigan State University (carlinek@msu.edu). Mothers on the move: women's organizations and the history of mobility in a South African township Diane Whitelaw, Queens University (16dew1@queensu.ca). Gender and Decolonization in Zambia

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Lilian Maureen Nyatichi Kebaya; Dalton Wamalwa; Nyambura Kariuki; Bashir Admani; Philip Ayieko; Ruth Nduati;
    Publisher: BioMed Central
    Country: Canada

    Abstract Background HIV is a major contributor to infant mortality. A significant gap remains between the uptake of infant and maternal antiretroviral regimens and only a minority of HIV-exposed infants receives prophylaxis and safe infant feeding. Losses to follow-up of HIV-exposed infants are associated with shortcomings of facility-based PMTCT models with weak community support of linkages. Use of mobile phones offers an opportunity for improving care and promoting retention assessed by timely attendance of scheduled appointments for the mother-baby pairs and achievement of an HIV-free generation. The objective of this study was to compare self-reported adherence to infant Nevirapine (NVP) prophylaxis and retention in care assessed by timely attendance of scheduled appointments over 10 weeks in HIV exposed infants randomized to 2-weekly mobile phone calls (intervention) versus no phone calls (control). Methods In this open label randomized controlled study, one hundred and fifty HIV infected women drawn from 3 health facilities in Western Kenya and their infants were randomly assigned to receive either phone-based reminders on PMTCT messages or standard health care messages (no calls) within 24 h of delivery. Women in the intervention arm continued to receive fortnightly phone calls. At 6- and 10-weeks following randomization we collected data on infant adherence to Nevirapine, mode of infant feeding, early HIV testing and retention in care in both study arms. All analyses were intention to treat. Results At 6 weeks follow-up, 90.7% (n = 68) of participants receiving phone calls reported adherence to infant NVP prophylaxis, compared with 72% (n = 54) of participants in the control group (p = 0.005). Participants in the intervention arm were also significantly more likely to remain in care than participants in the control group [78.7% (n = 59) vs. 58.7% (n = 44), p = 0.009 at 6 weeks and 69.3% (n = 52) vs. 37.3% (n = 28), p < 0.001 at 10 weeks]. Conclusions These results suggest that phone calls are potentially an important tool to improve adherence to infant NVP prophylaxis and retention in care for HIV-exposed infants. Trial registration PACTR202007654729602. Registered 6 June 2018 - Retrospectively registered, https://pactr.samrc.ac.za/TrialDisplay.aspx?TrialID=3449

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Clinical Neurological Sciences, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Testing biceps (C5, C6 musculocutaneous nerve) reflex in the arm sitting with neurologist and medical student trainee present-no sound https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/neuro_reflexes/1005/thumbnail.jpg

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cui, QingXiao;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    This presentation covers two internships I undertook from July to September 2020 and October 2020 to February 2021: respectively, a website design internship with MikonoYetu and Western Heads East, and a promotional internship with the Single Women in Motherhood Training Program, or S.W.I.M. It discusses the duties I undertook on a team of other interns, the hard and soft skills I developed by branching out into fields I would not have on my own, the implications for my future career path, and the relevance of my SASAH education. It also discusses the remote nature of the internships and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as recommendations to other students and prospective interns.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fuya-Duenas, Sandra Rocio;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Coloquio entre dos Perros (Dialogue between two Dogs) is a comic chamber opera for four solo voices (one mezzo-soprano, one tenor and two baritones) and mixed ensemble (oboe, viola, guitar and percussion). The libretto, written in modern American Spanish, is based on the novel by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra entitled Coloquio que pasó entre Cipión y Berganza, perros del Hospital de la Resurrección, que está en la ciudad de Valladolid fuera de la puerta del campo, a quien comúnmente llaman los perros de Mahudes. The opera is divided into nine scenes, which relate the stories from the life of Berganza, a dog from Seville, who tells those stories to his friend and female dog, Scipiona. The music of the opera explores Messiaen's sixth mode of limited transpositions and its derived modes. Likewise, the music uses rhythmic techniques from traditional Colombian music and scales used in traditional Spanish music.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Yamuragiye, Assumpta;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Interprofessional collaboration (IPC) is a care model in which different healthcare providers work together to achieve optimum patient outcomes. Ineffective IPC may lead to up to 70% of adverse events in obstetric care. In Rwanda, the need to reinforce effective IPC to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes was revealed following a maternal death audit conducted between 2009 and 2013. Also, in 2017, it was reported that 84% of maternal deaths were due to preventable causes, and 36% were due to delays within health facilities. To improve maternal and newborn care quality in Rwanda, the ‘Training Support Access Model for Maternal Newborn and Child Health’ (TSAM-MNCH) project initiated mentorship programs in 2017. The purpose of this study was to explore IPC experiences among obstetric and neonatal care team members who participated in mentorship to explore the barriers and benefits in implementing IPC. A qualitative descriptive case study design underpinned by a constructivism paradigm was used, semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-five healthcare provider mentees and five director generals of the five hospitals where mentorship was implemented. The findings suggest that in general participants were not satisfied with the current IPC practice, they mentioned several challenges dominated by power relation issues affecting communication. Another challenge was a stressful work environment characterized by insufficient staff, lack of necessary equipment, and lack of motivation. Participants suggested training on IPC and the availability of protocols and guidelines to guide the clinical practice. The participant reported benefits of the TSAM mentorship program, included an increase in self-confidence and awareness of their own responsibilities, which also contributed to an improved working relationship. The results from this study contribute to evidence for improvement in IPC practice. There is a need for policymakers, hospital managers, researchers, and health professional educators to create more systematic ways to improve IPC, including training on IPC and ensuring IPC remains on the health priority agenda. Future studies should identify the number of maternal and neonatal deaths caused by a failure in effective collaboration and strategies to sustain the improvements in practice as a result of mentorship programs.