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334 Research products, page 1 of 34

  • Canada
  • Research data
  • 2012-2021
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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ignace, Marianne; Ignace, Ron;
    Country: Canada

    This presentation discusses the path of re-claiming stories that were recorded from Secwepemc knowledge keepers in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Unfortunately, these stories survive in English renditions only. Through collaborative story-writing with elders in her home community, Skeetchestn and other Secwepemc communities, Marianne Ignace and Chief Ron Ignace re-translated and re-claimed them in the Secwepemc language by re-thinking their meaning, style and message, and the places and environments they connect to. The group then turned them into digital media, accompanied by vibrant illustrations which also involved collaboration between a young artist and elders. Making these available, celebrating them on the land and reconnecting to the places of the stories, but then also making them available as an app to enable digital learning allows new generations of Secwepemc to access them and learn to tell them. SPEAKER BIO Marianne Ignace is the director of the First Nations Language Centre at Simon Fraser University, and is a professor in the departments of Linguistics and First Nations Studies. She currently directs a seven-year SSHRC Partnership Grant on First Nations language revitalization in BC and Yukon, working with 12 diverse language groups. Her own research has focused on Secwepemc, Sm’algyax and Haida language documentation, and she continues to work with elders and language learners in her home community, Skeetchestn, in her adopted community, Old Massett in Haida Gwaii and with Sm’algyax speakers and learners in Prince Rupert. Her other interests are ethnobotany and Indigenous language story-work.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Khelsilem; Am Johal; Melissa Roach; Paige Smith; Kathy Feng; Alyha Bardi;
    Country: Canada

    Squamish Nation Councillor and community leader Khelsilem joins Am Johal on this first episode of Below the Radar’s Climate Justice & Inequality series. In this episode, they discuss the climate crisis as a result of the colonial project, how climate change hits hardest for those already at a disadvantage, and the spaces where colonialism has existed within climate movements. Khelsilem speaks to his critique of fossil fuel infrastructure, the false narrative of individual responsibility, and the role governments play in worsening the crisis through policy decisions that favour oil and gas. We also hear about innovative affordable housing projects, such as Squamish Nation’s Sen̓áḵw Development, and how to build climate-friendly design into new housing models.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Boutang, Davin; Godefroy, Anna; Johal, Am;
    Country: Canada

    The Binners’ Project is a Vancouver-based initiative dedicated to advocating for waste-pickers in the city. Am Johal interviews Binners’ Project staff members Davin Boutang and Anna Godefroy about their beginnings and evolution as an organization. They discuss their Universal Carts Initiative, the Coffee Cup Revolution and how the project has grown in its capacity to create opportunities for binners, destigmatizing the work they do in diverting waste from landfills.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Interviewee: LaFrance, Jenna; Interviewer: Virk, Arminder; Oral Testimony Archivist(s): Weasel Bear, Robyn; Principle Investigator: ross, Dr. annie;
    Country: Canada

    Jenna La France talks about traditional aboriginal approach to environment and the land, compared to consumerist mentality that does not have a relationship with the land. She also speaks about multinational corporations destroying the land for profit, or relocation people for mega hydro electric projects, and how little control citizens have over it. Discusses Enbridge’s ‘clean and green’ motto and how the oil sands project promotes jobs, but the reality is these projects only pollute the land and create disease, and when people protest, they are put in jail.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johal, Am; Coulthard,Glen;
    Country: Canada

    Glen Coulthard is Yellowknives Dene and is an associate professor in the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. He is also the author of the acclaimed book Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition from University of Minnesota Press. On this special episode live from the Vancouver Podcast Festival, host Am Johal sits down with Glen to talk about who and what influences his work and research, the different projects he’s been involved in over the years, and what continues to inspire him to do the work he does.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sangra, Baljit; Johal, Am; Saba, Maria Cecilia;
    Country: Canada

    Episode 18 features Baljit Sangra, a Vancouver-based documentarian and filmmaker. Baljit's latest documentary, "Because We Are Girls", is a powerful film that follows three Indo-Canadian sisters from Williams Lake, BC, who experienced sexual abuse by an older relative in their childhood years. Through an empathetic lens, Baljit shows the sisters’ laughs and struggles, as they seek to break the cycle of abuse and redress the wrongs within their family. Am Johal and Maria Cecilia Saba talk to Baljit about her approach to a complex story in a way that highlights her heroines’ humanity and the power of true sisterhood. Read more about "Because We Are Girls" here: vivamantra.ca/

  • Research data . Sound . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johal, Am; Adleman, Dan;
    Country: Canada

    On this episode of Below the Radar, our host Am Johal sits down with Dan Adleman, an Assistant Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Toronto. He has also previously taught at the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia Institute of Technology, and Emily Carr Institute of Art + Design. Dan received his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2016, in his dissertation he explores new-rhetorical approaches to American fiction grappling with the emergence of a new media environment at the turn of the millennium. Alongside Am Johal, he is the co-founder of Vancouver Institute for Social Research, a non-profit graduate-level critical theory free school run out of the Or Gallery since 2013.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement;
    Country: Canada

    In July 2017 members of the DTES community started meeting as a collective at the Hives for Humanity Bee Space to have conversation about how to ensure that community ethics are a respected part of the process of cultural production. We define cultural production as being: any time an entity comes into a community to make a product from its culture. ie. individuals and/or organisations of journalists, film makers, photographers, students, researchers, tourists or volunteers. We define community ethics as being: a set of principles to guide behaviour, based in lived experience, acknowledging the interconnectedness of our humanity, fostering relationships of respect, responsibility, reciprocity and return. We have produced a resource card and a manifesto out of these meetings which we are launching at our event on March 7th 2019, 7pm-9pm at SFU Woodwards. Copies of the card and manifesto will be available for all to take out into the community, and will be open sourced after the event. The evening included a short panel discussion with members of the collective sharing their experiences of cultural production – the good, the bad and the ugly! For more info visit: hivesforhumanity.com/communityethics/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    David Eby; Am Johal; Fiorella Pinillos; Melissa Roach; Paige Smith; Kathy Feng; Alex Abahmed;
    Country: Canada

    David Eby is the provincial government representative (MLA) for Vancouver-Point Grey, first elected in 2013. A proud local resident, David was re-elected in 2020 to serve a third term in the B.C. Legislature and in November 2020 was appointed to his current role as Attorney General and Minister of Housing by Premier John Horgan. Before he was elected, David was the Executive Director of the BC Civil Liberties Association, an adjunct professor of law at the University of British Columbia, president of the HIV/AIDS Legal Network, and served on the Vancouver Foundation’s Health and Social Development Committee. An award-winning human rights lawyer, he has been repeatedly recognized in local media as one of British Columbia’s most effective advocates and has appeared at all levels of court in BC. His years of legal advocacy at Pivot Legal Society to protect the human rights and dignity of homeless and under-housed residents of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside were recognized in 2011 by the UN Association in Canada and the B.C. Human Rights Coalition with their annual award. David is the author of several books and articles on legal rights. His handbook on arrest rights is now in its third printing, with more than 10,000 copies in circulation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johal, Am; Bernstein, Scott;
    Country: Canada

    On this episode of Below the Radar, our host Am Johal is joined by Scott Bernstein, the Director of Policy at Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, a project based at the Faculty of Health Sciences at SFU. He has also done work with Pivot Legal Society in Vancouver and internationally with Open Society Foundations in New York. Together, Am and Scott talk about his work involving harm reduction, decriminalization and drug regulation policies, and discuss potential regulation models with studies such as North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) and Study to Assess Longer-term Opioid Medication Effectiveness (SALOME).

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
334 Research products, page 1 of 34
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ignace, Marianne; Ignace, Ron;
    Country: Canada

    This presentation discusses the path of re-claiming stories that were recorded from Secwepemc knowledge keepers in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Unfortunately, these stories survive in English renditions only. Through collaborative story-writing with elders in her home community, Skeetchestn and other Secwepemc communities, Marianne Ignace and Chief Ron Ignace re-translated and re-claimed them in the Secwepemc language by re-thinking their meaning, style and message, and the places and environments they connect to. The group then turned them into digital media, accompanied by vibrant illustrations which also involved collaboration between a young artist and elders. Making these available, celebrating them on the land and reconnecting to the places of the stories, but then also making them available as an app to enable digital learning allows new generations of Secwepemc to access them and learn to tell them. SPEAKER BIO Marianne Ignace is the director of the First Nations Language Centre at Simon Fraser University, and is a professor in the departments of Linguistics and First Nations Studies. She currently directs a seven-year SSHRC Partnership Grant on First Nations language revitalization in BC and Yukon, working with 12 diverse language groups. Her own research has focused on Secwepemc, Sm’algyax and Haida language documentation, and she continues to work with elders and language learners in her home community, Skeetchestn, in her adopted community, Old Massett in Haida Gwaii and with Sm’algyax speakers and learners in Prince Rupert. Her other interests are ethnobotany and Indigenous language story-work.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Khelsilem; Am Johal; Melissa Roach; Paige Smith; Kathy Feng; Alyha Bardi;
    Country: Canada

    Squamish Nation Councillor and community leader Khelsilem joins Am Johal on this first episode of Below the Radar’s Climate Justice & Inequality series. In this episode, they discuss the climate crisis as a result of the colonial project, how climate change hits hardest for those already at a disadvantage, and the spaces where colonialism has existed within climate movements. Khelsilem speaks to his critique of fossil fuel infrastructure, the false narrative of individual responsibility, and the role governments play in worsening the crisis through policy decisions that favour oil and gas. We also hear about innovative affordable housing projects, such as Squamish Nation’s Sen̓áḵw Development, and how to build climate-friendly design into new housing models.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Boutang, Davin; Godefroy, Anna; Johal, Am;
    Country: Canada

    The Binners’ Project is a Vancouver-based initiative dedicated to advocating for waste-pickers in the city. Am Johal interviews Binners’ Project staff members Davin Boutang and Anna Godefroy about their beginnings and evolution as an organization. They discuss their Universal Carts Initiative, the Coffee Cup Revolution and how the project has grown in its capacity to create opportunities for binners, destigmatizing the work they do in diverting waste from landfills.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Interviewee: LaFrance, Jenna; Interviewer: Virk, Arminder; Oral Testimony Archivist(s): Weasel Bear, Robyn; Principle Investigator: ross, Dr. annie;
    Country: Canada

    Jenna La France talks about traditional aboriginal approach to environment and the land, compared to consumerist mentality that does not have a relationship with the land. She also speaks about multinational corporations destroying the land for profit, or relocation people for mega hydro electric projects, and how little control citizens have over it. Discusses Enbridge’s ‘clean and green’ motto and how the oil sands project promotes jobs, but the reality is these projects only pollute the land and create disease, and when people protest, they are put in jail.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johal, Am; Coulthard,Glen;
    Country: Canada

    Glen Coulthard is Yellowknives Dene and is an associate professor in the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at the University of British Columbia. He is also the author of the acclaimed book Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition from University of Minnesota Press. On this special episode live from the Vancouver Podcast Festival, host Am Johal sits down with Glen to talk about who and what influences his work and research, the different projects he’s been involved in over the years, and what continues to inspire him to do the work he does.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sangra, Baljit; Johal, Am; Saba, Maria Cecilia;
    Country: Canada

    Episode 18 features Baljit Sangra, a Vancouver-based documentarian and filmmaker. Baljit's latest documentary, "Because We Are Girls", is a powerful film that follows three Indo-Canadian sisters from Williams Lake, BC, who experienced sexual abuse by an older relative in their childhood years. Through an empathetic lens, Baljit shows the sisters’ laughs and struggles, as they seek to break the cycle of abuse and redress the wrongs within their family. Am Johal and Maria Cecilia Saba talk to Baljit about her approach to a complex story in a way that highlights her heroines’ humanity and the power of true sisterhood. Read more about "Because We Are Girls" here: vivamantra.ca/

  • Research data . Sound . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johal, Am; Adleman, Dan;
    Country: Canada

    On this episode of Below the Radar, our host Am Johal sits down with Dan Adleman, an Assistant Professor of Writing and Rhetoric at the University of Toronto. He has also previously taught at the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia Institute of Technology, and Emily Carr Institute of Art + Design. Dan received his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2016, in his dissertation he explores new-rhetorical approaches to American fiction grappling with the emergence of a new media environment at the turn of the millennium. Alongside Am Johal, he is the co-founder of Vancouver Institute for Social Research, a non-profit graduate-level critical theory free school run out of the Or Gallery since 2013.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement;
    Country: Canada

    In July 2017 members of the DTES community started meeting as a collective at the Hives for Humanity Bee Space to have conversation about how to ensure that community ethics are a respected part of the process of cultural production. We define cultural production as being: any time an entity comes into a community to make a product from its culture. ie. individuals and/or organisations of journalists, film makers, photographers, students, researchers, tourists or volunteers. We define community ethics as being: a set of principles to guide behaviour, based in lived experience, acknowledging the interconnectedness of our humanity, fostering relationships of respect, responsibility, reciprocity and return. We have produced a resource card and a manifesto out of these meetings which we are launching at our event on March 7th 2019, 7pm-9pm at SFU Woodwards. Copies of the card and manifesto will be available for all to take out into the community, and will be open sourced after the event. The evening included a short panel discussion with members of the collective sharing their experiences of cultural production – the good, the bad and the ugly! For more info visit: hivesforhumanity.com/communityethics/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    David Eby; Am Johal; Fiorella Pinillos; Melissa Roach; Paige Smith; Kathy Feng; Alex Abahmed;
    Country: Canada

    David Eby is the provincial government representative (MLA) for Vancouver-Point Grey, first elected in 2013. A proud local resident, David was re-elected in 2020 to serve a third term in the B.C. Legislature and in November 2020 was appointed to his current role as Attorney General and Minister of Housing by Premier John Horgan. Before he was elected, David was the Executive Director of the BC Civil Liberties Association, an adjunct professor of law at the University of British Columbia, president of the HIV/AIDS Legal Network, and served on the Vancouver Foundation’s Health and Social Development Committee. An award-winning human rights lawyer, he has been repeatedly recognized in local media as one of British Columbia’s most effective advocates and has appeared at all levels of court in BC. His years of legal advocacy at Pivot Legal Society to protect the human rights and dignity of homeless and under-housed residents of Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside were recognized in 2011 by the UN Association in Canada and the B.C. Human Rights Coalition with their annual award. David is the author of several books and articles on legal rights. His handbook on arrest rights is now in its third printing, with more than 10,000 copies in circulation.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Johal, Am; Bernstein, Scott;
    Country: Canada

    On this episode of Below the Radar, our host Am Johal is joined by Scott Bernstein, the Director of Policy at Canadian Drug Policy Coalition, a project based at the Faculty of Health Sciences at SFU. He has also done work with Pivot Legal Society in Vancouver and internationally with Open Society Foundations in New York. Together, Am and Scott talk about his work involving harm reduction, decriminalization and drug regulation policies, and discuss potential regulation models with studies such as North American Opiate Medication Initiative (NAOMI) and Study to Assess Longer-term Opioid Medication Effectiveness (SALOME).