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18 Research products, page 1 of 2

  • Canada
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  • 2012-2021
  • Transport Research

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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thibault, Jenna;
    Country: Canada

    Overview: There is a growing need to develop age-friendly communities to meet the challenges seniors face as they age (Cerda and Bernier, 2013). By the year 2050, the population will be comprised of a greater proportion of older people (aged 60 and over) than children (aged 0 to 14) for the first time in human history (Plouffe and Kalache, 2010). The World Health Organization (WHO) is trying to encourage cities to become more age-friendly and has identified eight key themes, relating to a city’s structures, environment, services and policies, which are conducive to a community that promotes active aging (WHO, 2007a). Although active aging is a complex concept and extends beyond solely ensuring that seniors remain physically active, designing neighbourhoods that promote mobility is critical since many seniors want to “age in place” (Smith, 2009). Seniors that experience fewer limitations on their mobility maintain a stronger sense of independence and control over their lives (Hodge, 2008). Since 2012, the City of Kingston has been engaged in the process of becoming classified as an age-friendly city (City of Kingston, 2012). The City’s commitment to this initiative provided the rationale for conducting age-friendly research in Kingston. Specifically, this research sought to examine the age-friendly cities concept, with an explicit focus on those age-friendly features that influence mobility. According to Hodge (2008) the primary factor influencing mobility for seniors is the availability and accessibility of transportation, whether by foot, public transit, a personal vehicle or another mode of transportation. From the eight themes identified by the WHO, the topics of “Outdoor spaces and buildings” and “Transportation” are two topics closely linked to this idea that the physical environment influences an individual’s ease of mobility (WHO, 2007a). Report Objective: The objective of this report was to investigate how two suburban developments in Kingston, Ontario promote mobility for seniors by assessing and comparing the age-friendliness of the pedestrian environment and existing public transportation infrastructure and services. The two suburban developments selected were the recently developed Walnut Grove, an ‘adult-lifestyle community’, and Bayridge West, an older suburban development. These developments share the commonality of possessing a high proportion of older adults (aged 55+) compared to other areas in the City, and differ in terms of their built form. In addition to comparing the age-friendliness of these two suburban developments, this report also examined whether the weaknesses uncovered through the analyses of these sites were city-wide problems, or site-specific. Methods: This report used the comparative case study approach (Yin, 2014) to compare the age-friendliness of these two sites. The primary method of data collection involved conducting field observations using a comprehensive evaluation tool to assess different age-friendly attributes of the pedestrian environment and public transportation infrastructure and services. Field observations were conducted over four data collection periods in order to consider time-of-day and seasonal variations. Two rounds of document reviews were also conducted. Round One examined whether the shortfalls observed within the two suburban developments were city-wide challenges or site-specific problems, while Round Two examined the current commitments of the City to plan for age-friendly communities with respect to the built environment and public transportation. Key Findings and Recommendations: Bayridge West scored considerably better than Walnut Grove in terms of the public transportation theme, whereas the difference was much smaller in terms of the pedestrian environment. The first document review revealed considerable correspondence between the results of the field analyses and the problems identified by focus group participants for the City of Kingston in general. The second document review found that the City has various action-based and policy-based commitments, along with strategies and visions, for creating a more age-friendly city. However, these current commitments do not address all of the shortfalls identified through this research. As such, four recommendations are proposed for helping the City of Kingston achieve its goal of creating age-friendly communities: 1. Conduct an accessibility survey to address the observation of insufficient sidewalk widths. 2. Install bus shelters with benches, route information and lighting. 3. Investigate the feasibility of installing audible traffic signals at existing intersections. 4. Conduct age-friendly evaluation surveys throughout the city.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Stoyanovich, Sawyer; Zeyu Yang; Hanson, Mark; Hollebone, Bruce P; Orihel, Diane M; Palace, Vince; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose R; Faragher, Robert; Fatemah S Mirnaghi; Keval Shah; +1 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Project: NSERC

    The main petroleum product transported through pipelines in Canada is diluted bitumen (dilbit), a semi-liquid form of heavy crude oil mixed with natural gas condensates to facilitate transport. The weathering, fate, behaviour, and environmental effects of dilbit are crucial to consider when responding to a spill, however few environmental studies on dilbit have been completed. Here we report on 11-day long experimental spills of dilbit (Cold Lake Winter Blend) in outdoor micro-cosms meant to simulate a low-energy aquatic system containing natural lake water and sedi-ments treated with a low (1:8,000 oil:water) and high (1:800 oil:water) volume of dilbit. In the first 24 hours of the experiment, volatile hydrocarbons quickly evaporated from the dilbit, result-ing in increased dilbit density and viscosity. These changes in dilbit’s physical and chemical properties ultimately led to its submergence after 8 days. We also detected rapid accumulation of polycyclic aromatic compounds in the water column of the treated-microcosms following the spills. Our study provides new information on the environmental fate and behaviour of dilbit in a freshwater environment that will be critical to environmental risk assessments of proposed pipe-line projects. In particular, our study demonstrates the propensity for dilbit to sink under ambient environmental conditions in fresh waters typical of many boreal lakes.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Hadden, Trevor;
    Country: Canada
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McGowan, Ellen;
    Country: Canada

    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has radically impacted public transport ridership and service provision across the country. Since the outbreak of the virus, transit agencies have had to adapt to new and rapidly evolving conditions. Many agencies modified services to reflect lower ridership levels and to ensure the safety of both riders and operators. These changes in service were guided by public health agencies, as well as major transit associations like the Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) and International Association of Public Transport (UITP). Other agencies implemented precautionary measures like rear door boarding, temporary fare suspension, and reduced capacity limits to enable the safe continuity of operations. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, transit agencies are having to strike a balance between providing enough transportation options for essential travel and reducing service offerings to match the declining overall demand for mobility services. Using a case study of Grand River Transit (GRT) in the Region of Waterloo, this report will document the impacts of COVID-19 on transit agencies and their responses, with a focus on modifications to services. By analyzing the challenges that transit agencies faced in modifying transit services, this report will offer guidance on the protocols and procedures that should be established for an effective pandemic response. Further, the findings of this report will help to inform discussions and guide decisions on the role and operation of public transit in future pandemic events. 

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Grande, Giuseppe;
    Country: Canada

    This research presents a series of projects that contribute to the understanding of how traffic variability affects the measurement and application of annual average daily traffic (AADT). AADT is the most fundamental traffic statistic in transportation engineering. It is defined as the number of vehicles expected to use a facility on an average day. However, traffic is known to experience periodical fluctuations over time; these periodicities are location-specific. This underlying variability in time and space can be lost when calculating and reporting AADT. This research comprises four research projects. The first evaluates the effectiveness of multiple AADT formulations using simulated data loss scenarios. It finds that a relatively new methodology, proposed by the Federal Highway Administration in the United States, removes a small, systematic bias (0.1%) from the existing calculation convention and reduces the width of the 95% confidence interval by 0.5%. The second project provides a method for measuring and reducing the error produced during the assignment step of the AADT estimation process. It applies this method to a case study, finding that the novel assignment method reduces errors by 2.5% on average. The third project explores the use of unconventional traffic data sources (passively-collected vehicle probe data) in tandem with conventional sources. The research finds that speed-based probe data are most closely correlated with truck-specific volume data, specifically around urban centres and along major trade routes. In the studied data, the Pearson correlation coefficient reached 0.9 at some sites. The final project tests the sensitivity of grade crossing design and regulation to predicted fluctuations in traffic. The results show that daily variations in traffic can cause sites to be apparently over- or under-designed for a day or group of days, when compared to regulatory standards. Moreover, they show that within-day variations can be used to express more detailed grade crossing exposure estimates than the daily averages that are used in current regulations. On aggregate, the research finds that, while AADT estimates are convenient to calculate and ubiquitously applied, there is a need to better disclose the source data and methodologies used to produce AADT estimates to avoid misuse and false assumptions about comparability. Further, AADT summarizes the traffic at a site into a single average volume, which fails to express the known periodical traffic variability at a site.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    George, Tyler;
    Country: Canada

    Within the transit industry it is well known that transit buses have the potential to operate at weights that exceed vehicle weight limits. However, few attempts have been made to date to determine how often this occurs and to what degree. This research characterizes the current transit industry with respect to the regulatory environment, factors that have affected the weight of modern day transit buses, and methods for accommodating transit buses in pavement design. This research then develops and applies a methodology for calculating the in-service weights of standard 40-ft. transit buses using a combination of passenger characteristic data, transit bus curb weight data, and transit ridership data. The findings of this research suggest that the transit bus industry is in a state of competing interests. Weight estimates developed in this research identify that current transit bus models are unable to comply with vehicle weight limits in most jurisdictions even with no passengers on board. Further, these estimates indicate that transit buses have a significant impact on pavements – comparable to those of fully-loaded, five-axle semi-trucks on a per vehicle basis. To date this issue has been addressed in the Canadian Prairie Region by indefinitely granting transit buses overweight permits. However, based on the current state of the transit industry there is little incentive for transit agencies to operate lightweight transit buses and little incentive for transit bus manufacturers to produce lightweight transit buses in order to address pavement and regulatory concerns. Consequently, transit bus axle weight issues in the Canadian Prairie Region are expected to continue in the foreseeable future.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pariyarath, Anand Maniyam;
    Country: Canada

    Increased penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) and renewable energy sources (RESs) in power systems can directly affect the system reliability and impose additional complexities to planning and operation due to their uncertainties. The traditional planning methods based on deterministic analysis fail to accurately capture the impact of the aforementioned uncertainty on the system reliability. In this thesis, a reliability-oriented distribution system analysis methodology that captures the complex interactions between EVs, photovoltaic (PV) power production, and energy storage is proposed. Firstly, a two-layer stochastic EV charging demand estimation model is proposed. The model comprises of a traffic layer representing the spatial-temporal distributions of EVs and an electrical network layer describing the impact of EV charging demand on electrical network. A Dynamic Hidden Markov model is used to capture the EV movements in the traffic layer. The ability of the traffic layer model to faithfully represent the random travel pattern of actual vehicles used by different types of drivers is examined. Secondly, a novel stochastic solar radiation model based on probability distributions of the first-order differences of hourly global solar horizontal radiation is proposed to calculate the stochastic power output of the PV system. Measured solar radiation data from four different locations with varying climate characteristics were used to evaluate the proposed model in comparison to two previously reported models. Additionally, various computational models such as the EV charging station model, reliability evaluation model, and economic evaluation model are developed to support the reliability and economic evaluation with necessary inputs. Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) is used to analyze a range of best to worst-case scenarios for more optimal outcomes. A range of sensitivity analysis is performed to illustrate the reliability and economic impact due to EV charging, PV power production and various operating strategies. Several new reliability indices are proposed to quantify the impact of EV charging characteristics, RES penetration, and energy storage system (ESS) on the reliability performance of distribution systems. Finally, an optimization algorithm along with developed stochastic models and MCS framework is used for the optimization of the resource sizes considering EV charging stations (EVCSs) life-cycle costs, reliability and emissions.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhao, Nan;
    Country: Canada
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Tu, Chia-Hao;
    Country: Canada
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Du, Q.; Kim, A. M.; Zheng, Y.;
    Country: Canada

    In Canada’s Northwest Territories, goods are delivered to remote communities and natural resource extraction sites by inland barge, trucks, and for some goods, air. Combinations of all-weather and winter roads are used in the winter months, while river barge transport and all-weather roads are used in the summer. However, Northern Canada is disproportionately impacted by climate change, which results in greater variability in water level conditions on the Mackenzie River from year to year. This in turn critically affects tug-and-barge operations on the river. This paper investigates Mackenzie River Corridor freight delivery performance – with a focus on the river route – considering how variations in river water conditions can impact network operations and operational costs. We investigate the impacts of water level variation on shippers’ route choice decisions, waterway supply capacity and the resulting overall performance of the freight transport system. Model outcomes provide insights into how the multimodal transportation network may be utilized and perform (quantified by delays and generalized costs) under different water level scenarios. The overarching purpose of the analysis is to provide guidance for infrastructure investment decision-making and business case development, to maintain an effective freight transportation network in the face of on-going climate change impacts.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
18 Research products, page 1 of 2
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Thibault, Jenna;
    Country: Canada

    Overview: There is a growing need to develop age-friendly communities to meet the challenges seniors face as they age (Cerda and Bernier, 2013). By the year 2050, the population will be comprised of a greater proportion of older people (aged 60 and over) than children (aged 0 to 14) for the first time in human history (Plouffe and Kalache, 2010). The World Health Organization (WHO) is trying to encourage cities to become more age-friendly and has identified eight key themes, relating to a city’s structures, environment, services and policies, which are conducive to a community that promotes active aging (WHO, 2007a). Although active aging is a complex concept and extends beyond solely ensuring that seniors remain physically active, designing neighbourhoods that promote mobility is critical since many seniors want to “age in place” (Smith, 2009). Seniors that experience fewer limitations on their mobility maintain a stronger sense of independence and control over their lives (Hodge, 2008). Since 2012, the City of Kingston has been engaged in the process of becoming classified as an age-friendly city (City of Kingston, 2012). The City’s commitment to this initiative provided the rationale for conducting age-friendly research in Kingston. Specifically, this research sought to examine the age-friendly cities concept, with an explicit focus on those age-friendly features that influence mobility. According to Hodge (2008) the primary factor influencing mobility for seniors is the availability and accessibility of transportation, whether by foot, public transit, a personal vehicle or another mode of transportation. From the eight themes identified by the WHO, the topics of “Outdoor spaces and buildings” and “Transportation” are two topics closely linked to this idea that the physical environment influences an individual’s ease of mobility (WHO, 2007a). Report Objective: The objective of this report was to investigate how two suburban developments in Kingston, Ontario promote mobility for seniors by assessing and comparing the age-friendliness of the pedestrian environment and existing public transportation infrastructure and services. The two suburban developments selected were the recently developed Walnut Grove, an ‘adult-lifestyle community’, and Bayridge West, an older suburban development. These developments share the commonality of possessing a high proportion of older adults (aged 55+) compared to other areas in the City, and differ in terms of their built form. In addition to comparing the age-friendliness of these two suburban developments, this report also examined whether the weaknesses uncovered through the analyses of these sites were city-wide problems, or site-specific. Methods: This report used the comparative case study approach (Yin, 2014) to compare the age-friendliness of these two sites. The primary method of data collection involved conducting field observations using a comprehensive evaluation tool to assess different age-friendly attributes of the pedestrian environment and public transportation infrastructure and services. Field observations were conducted over four data collection periods in order to consider time-of-day and seasonal variations. Two rounds of document reviews were also conducted. Round One examined whether the shortfalls observed within the two suburban developments were city-wide challenges or site-specific problems, while Round Two examined the current commitments of the City to plan for age-friendly communities with respect to the built environment and public transportation. Key Findings and Recommendations: Bayridge West scored considerably better than Walnut Grove in terms of the public transportation theme, whereas the difference was much smaller in terms of the pedestrian environment. The first document review revealed considerable correspondence between the results of the field analyses and the problems identified by focus group participants for the City of Kingston in general. The second document review found that the City has various action-based and policy-based commitments, along with strategies and visions, for creating a more age-friendly city. However, these current commitments do not address all of the shortfalls identified through this research. As such, four recommendations are proposed for helping the City of Kingston achieve its goal of creating age-friendly communities: 1. Conduct an accessibility survey to address the observation of insufficient sidewalk widths. 2. Install bus shelters with benches, route information and lighting. 3. Investigate the feasibility of installing audible traffic signals at existing intersections. 4. Conduct age-friendly evaluation surveys throughout the city.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Stoyanovich, Sawyer; Zeyu Yang; Hanson, Mark; Hollebone, Bruce P; Orihel, Diane M; Palace, Vince; Rodriguez-Gil, Jose R; Faragher, Robert; Fatemah S Mirnaghi; Keval Shah; +1 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Project: NSERC

    The main petroleum product transported through pipelines in Canada is diluted bitumen (dilbit), a semi-liquid form of heavy crude oil mixed with natural gas condensates to facilitate transport. The weathering, fate, behaviour, and environmental effects of dilbit are crucial to consider when responding to a spill, however few environmental studies on dilbit have been completed. Here we report on 11-day long experimental spills of dilbit (Cold Lake Winter Blend) in outdoor micro-cosms meant to simulate a low-energy aquatic system containing natural lake water and sedi-ments treated with a low (1:8,000 oil:water) and high (1:800 oil:water) volume of dilbit. In the first 24 hours of the experiment, volatile hydrocarbons quickly evaporated from the dilbit, result-ing in increased dilbit density and viscosity. These changes in dilbit’s physical and chemical properties ultimately led to its submergence after 8 days. We also detected rapid accumulation of polycyclic aromatic compounds in the water column of the treated-microcosms following the spills. Our study provides new information on the environmental fate and behaviour of dilbit in a freshwater environment that will be critical to environmental risk assessments of proposed pipe-line projects. In particular, our study demonstrates the propensity for dilbit to sink under ambient environmental conditions in fresh waters typical of many boreal lakes.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Hadden, Trevor;
    Country: Canada
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    McGowan, Ellen;
    Country: Canada

    The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has radically impacted public transport ridership and service provision across the country. Since the outbreak of the virus, transit agencies have had to adapt to new and rapidly evolving conditions. Many agencies modified services to reflect lower ridership levels and to ensure the safety of both riders and operators. These changes in service were guided by public health agencies, as well as major transit associations like the Canadian Urban Transit Association (CUTA) and International Association of Public Transport (UITP). Other agencies implemented precautionary measures like rear door boarding, temporary fare suspension, and reduced capacity limits to enable the safe continuity of operations. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, transit agencies are having to strike a balance between providing enough transportation options for essential travel and reducing service offerings to match the declining overall demand for mobility services. Using a case study of Grand River Transit (GRT) in the Region of Waterloo, this report will document the impacts of COVID-19 on transit agencies and their responses, with a focus on modifications to services. By analyzing the challenges that transit agencies faced in modifying transit services, this report will offer guidance on the protocols and procedures that should be established for an effective pandemic response. Further, the findings of this report will help to inform discussions and guide decisions on the role and operation of public transit in future pandemic events. 

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Grande, Giuseppe;
    Country: Canada

    This research presents a series of projects that contribute to the understanding of how traffic variability affects the measurement and application of annual average daily traffic (AADT). AADT is the most fundamental traffic statistic in transportation engineering. It is defined as the number of vehicles expected to use a facility on an average day. However, traffic is known to experience periodical fluctuations over time; these periodicities are location-specific. This underlying variability in time and space can be lost when calculating and reporting AADT. This research comprises four research projects. The first evaluates the effectiveness of multiple AADT formulations using simulated data loss scenarios. It finds that a relatively new methodology, proposed by the Federal Highway Administration in the United States, removes a small, systematic bias (0.1%) from the existing calculation convention and reduces the width of the 95% confidence interval by 0.5%. The second project provides a method for measuring and reducing the error produced during the assignment step of the AADT estimation process. It applies this method to a case study, finding that the novel assignment method reduces errors by 2.5% on average. The third project explores the use of unconventional traffic data sources (passively-collected vehicle probe data) in tandem with conventional sources. The research finds that speed-based probe data are most closely correlated with truck-specific volume data, specifically around urban centres and along major trade routes. In the studied data, the Pearson correlation coefficient reached 0.9 at some sites. The final project tests the sensitivity of grade crossing design and regulation to predicted fluctuations in traffic. The results show that daily variations in traffic can cause sites to be apparently over- or under-designed for a day or group of days, when compared to regulatory standards. Moreover, they show that within-day variations can be used to express more detailed grade crossing exposure estimates than the daily averages that are used in current regulations. On aggregate, the research finds that, while AADT estimates are convenient to calculate and ubiquitously applied, there is a need to better disclose the source data and methodologies used to produce AADT estimates to avoid misuse and false assumptions about comparability. Further, AADT summarizes the traffic at a site into a single average volume, which fails to express the known periodical traffic variability at a site.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    George, Tyler;
    Country: Canada

    Within the transit industry it is well known that transit buses have the potential to operate at weights that exceed vehicle weight limits. However, few attempts have been made to date to determine how often this occurs and to what degree. This research characterizes the current transit industry with respect to the regulatory environment, factors that have affected the weight of modern day transit buses, and methods for accommodating transit buses in pavement design. This research then develops and applies a methodology for calculating the in-service weights of standard 40-ft. transit buses using a combination of passenger characteristic data, transit bus curb weight data, and transit ridership data. The findings of this research suggest that the transit bus industry is in a state of competing interests. Weight estimates developed in this research identify that current transit bus models are unable to comply with vehicle weight limits in most jurisdictions even with no passengers on board. Further, these estimates indicate that transit buses have a significant impact on pavements – comparable to those of fully-loaded, five-axle semi-trucks on a per vehicle basis. To date this issue has been addressed in the Canadian Prairie Region by indefinitely granting transit buses overweight permits. However, based on the current state of the transit industry there is little incentive for transit agencies to operate lightweight transit buses and little incentive for transit bus manufacturers to produce lightweight transit buses in order to address pavement and regulatory concerns. Consequently, transit bus axle weight issues in the Canadian Prairie Region are expected to continue in the foreseeable future.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Pariyarath, Anand Maniyam;
    Country: Canada

    Increased penetration of electric vehicles (EVs) and renewable energy sources (RESs) in power systems can directly affect the system reliability and impose additional complexities to planning and operation due to their uncertainties. The traditional planning methods based on deterministic analysis fail to accurately capture the impact of the aforementioned uncertainty on the system reliability. In this thesis, a reliability-oriented distribution system analysis methodology that captures the complex interactions between EVs, photovoltaic (PV) power production, and energy storage is proposed. Firstly, a two-layer stochastic EV charging demand estimation model is proposed. The model comprises of a traffic layer representing the spatial-temporal distributions of EVs and an electrical network layer describing the impact of EV charging demand on electrical network. A Dynamic Hidden Markov model is used to capture the EV movements in the traffic layer. The ability of the traffic layer model to faithfully represent the random travel pattern of actual vehicles used by different types of drivers is examined. Secondly, a novel stochastic solar radiation model based on probability distributions of the first-order differences of hourly global solar horizontal radiation is proposed to calculate the stochastic power output of the PV system. Measured solar radiation data from four different locations with varying climate characteristics were used to evaluate the proposed model in comparison to two previously reported models. Additionally, various computational models such as the EV charging station model, reliability evaluation model, and economic evaluation model are developed to support the reliability and economic evaluation with necessary inputs. Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) is used to analyze a range of best to worst-case scenarios for more optimal outcomes. A range of sensitivity analysis is performed to illustrate the reliability and economic impact due to EV charging, PV power production and various operating strategies. Several new reliability indices are proposed to quantify the impact of EV charging characteristics, RES penetration, and energy storage system (ESS) on the reliability performance of distribution systems. Finally, an optimization algorithm along with developed stochastic models and MCS framework is used for the optimization of the resource sizes considering EV charging stations (EVCSs) life-cycle costs, reliability and emissions.

  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhao, Nan;
    Country: Canada
  • Closed Access English
    Authors: 
    Tu, Chia-Hao;
    Country: Canada
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Du, Q.; Kim, A. M.; Zheng, Y.;
    Country: Canada

    In Canada’s Northwest Territories, goods are delivered to remote communities and natural resource extraction sites by inland barge, trucks, and for some goods, air. Combinations of all-weather and winter roads are used in the winter months, while river barge transport and all-weather roads are used in the summer. However, Northern Canada is disproportionately impacted by climate change, which results in greater variability in water level conditions on the Mackenzie River from year to year. This in turn critically affects tug-and-barge operations on the river. This paper investigates Mackenzie River Corridor freight delivery performance – with a focus on the river route – considering how variations in river water conditions can impact network operations and operational costs. We investigate the impacts of water level variation on shippers’ route choice decisions, waterway supply capacity and the resulting overall performance of the freight transport system. Model outcomes provide insights into how the multimodal transportation network may be utilized and perform (quantified by delays and generalized costs) under different water level scenarios. The overarching purpose of the analysis is to provide guidance for infrastructure investment decision-making and business case development, to maintain an effective freight transportation network in the face of on-going climate change impacts.