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2,510 Research products, page 1 of 251

  • Canada
  • Research data
  • 2012-2021
  • Dataset
  • figshare

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mehdi, Ali; Cheishvili, David; Arakelian, Ani; Bismar, Tarek A.; Szyf, Moshe; Rabbani, Shafaat A.;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Supplementary Table 2. List of the primers used for pyrosequencing and amplicon sequencing (Illumina MiSeq system).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Donaldson, Michael E.; Davy, Christina M.; Vanderwolf, Karen J.; Willis, Craig K. R.; Saville, Barry J.; Kyle, Christopher J.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: NSERC

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causal agent of bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), which is devastating some North American bat populations. Previous transcriptome studies provided insight regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in WNS; however, it is unclear how different environmental parameters could influence pathogenicity. This information could be useful in developing management strategies to mitigate the negative impacts of P. destructans on bats. We cultured three P. destructans isolates from Atlantic Canada on two growth media (potato dextrose agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar) that differ in their nitrogen source, and at two separate incubation temperatures (4 C and 15 C) that approximate the temperature range of bat hibernacula during the winter and a temperature within its optimal mycelial growth range. We conducted RNA sequencing to determine transcript levels in each sample and performed differential gene expression (DGE) analyses to test the influence of growth medium and incubation temperature on gene expression. We also compared our in vitro results with previous RNA-sequencing data sets generated from P. destructans growing on the wings of a susceptible host, Myotis lucifugus. Our findings point to a critical role for substrate and incubation temperature in influencing the P. destructans transcriptome. DGE analyses suggested that growth medium plays a larger role than temperature in determining P. destructans gene expression and that although the psychrophilic fungus responds to different nitrogen sources, it may have evolved for continued growth at a broad range of low temperatures. Further, our data suggest that down-regulation of the RNA-interference pathway and increased fatty acid metabolism are involved in the P. destructans–bat interaction. Finally, we speculate that to reduce the activation of host defense responses, P. destructans minimizes changes in the expression of genes encoding secreted proteins during bat colonization.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Guanxiang Liang; Nilusha Malmuthuge; Bao, Hua; Stothard, Paul; Griebel, Philip; Guan, Le;
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR , NSERC

    Regionally DE genes list. (XLSX 282Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Doucet, Jennifer; Lee, Hyun; Nethangi Udugama; Jianfeng Xu; Baoxiu Qi; Goring, Daphne;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: NSERC

    Additional file 4 Table S3. Primers Used

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Schmidtke, Daniel; Gagné, Christina L.; Kuperman, Victor; Spalding, Thomas L.; Tucker, Benjamin V.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: SSHRC , NSERC

    Previous research has shown that compound word recognition involves selecting a relational meaning (e.g. “box for letters” for letterbox) out of a set of competing relational meanings for the same compound. We conducted five experiments to investigate the role of competition between relational meanings across visual and auditory compound word processing. In Experiment 1 conceptual relations judgments were collected for 604 English compound words. From this database we computed an information-theoretic measure of competition between conceptual relations – entropy of conceptual relations. Experiments 2 and 3 report that greater entropy (i.e. increased competition) among a set of conceptual relations leads to longer latencies for compounds in auditory lexical decision. Experiments 4 and 5 demonstrate the same result in two visual lexical decision studies. These findings provide evidence that relational meanings are constructed and evaluated during compound recognition, regardless of whether compounds are recognised via auditory or visual input.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hyshka, Elaine; Jalene Anderson-Baron; Kamagaju Karekezi; Belle-Isle, Lynne; Elliott, Richard; Pauly, Bernie; Strike, Carol; Asbridge, Mark; Dell, Colleen; McBride, Keely; +2 more
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Provincial and territorial policy documents and indicator scores; table contains all CHARPP indicator scores from 13 provincial and territorial harm reduction policy report cards. (XLSX 57Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nadeau, Rachel; Byvsheva, Anastasiia; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: NSERC

    Additional File 17: File S2. Ontologizer results of significantly dysregulated proteins from t-test results in Tyanova et al.’s dataset

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Liu, Feng; Cai, Ping; Imir Metushi; Jinze Li; Nakayawa, Tetsuya; Libia Vega; Uetrecht, Jack;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: CIHR

    Amodiaquine (AQ) is associated with a relatively high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. A previous study reported that a combination of high dose AQ and glutathione (GSH) depletion led to liver injury. However, the characteristics of this toxicity were very different from AQ-induced liver injury in humans. We developed a model of AQ-induced liver injury with characteristics similar to the injury in humans by treating mice with lower doses of AQ for several weeks. In this study we found that not only did GSH depletion not increase AQ covalent binding to hepatic proteins at this lower dose, but also it paradoxically prevented the liver injury. We extended the model to rats and found AQ treatment led to a mild delayed onset liver injury that resolved despite continued treatment with AQ. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of Kupffer cell activation, apoptosis and hepatocyte proliferation in the liver. There was also an increase in serum IL-2, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, MCP-1 and TGFβ, but a decrease in leptin. Coincident with the elevated serum ALT, the number of liver CD4+ T-cells, IL-17 secreting cells and TH17/Treg cells increased at Week 3 and decreased during continued treatment. Increases in NK1.1+ cells and activated M2 macrophages were also observed during liver injury. These results suggest that the outcome of the liver injury was determined by the balance between effector and regulatory cells. Co-treatment with cyclosporin prevented AQ-induced liver injury, which supports an immune mechanism. Retinoic acid (RA), which has been reported to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity, exacerbated AQ-induced liver injury. These results suggest that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated and the subsequent adaptation appears to represent immune tolerance.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bassel, Laura L.; Carmon Co; Macdonald, Alaina; Sly, Laurel; McCandless, Erin E.; Hewson, Joanne; Raksha Tiwari; Shayan Sharif; Siracusa, Laura; Clark, Mary Ellen; +1 more
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: NSERC

    Additional file 13. Data.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Brink, Kirstin S.; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Ya-Na Wu; Liu, Wei-Min; Dar-Bin Shieh; Huang, Timothy D.; Chi-Kuang Sun; Reisz, Robert R.;
    Publisher: The Royal Society
    Project: NSERC

    Teeth are key to understanding the feeding ecology of both extant and extinct vertebrates. Recent studies have highlighted the previously unrecognized complexity of dinosaur dentitions and how specific tooth tissues and tooth shapes differ between taxa with different diets. However, it is unknown how the ultrastructure of these tooth tissues contributes to the differences in feeding style between taxa. In this study, we use third harmonic generation microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to examine the ultrastructure of the dentine in herbivorous and carnivorous dinosaurs to understand how the structure of this tissue contributes to the overall utility of the tooth. Morphometric analyses of dentinal tubule diameter, density and branching rates reveal a strong signal for dietary preferences, with herbivorous saurischian and ornithischian dinosaurs consistently having higher dentinal tubule density than their carnivorous relatives. We hypothesize that this relates to the hardness of the dentine, where herbivorous taxa have dentine that is more resistant to breakage and wear at the dentine–enamel junction than carnivorous taxa. This study advocates the detailed study of dentine and the use of advanced microscopy techniques to understand the evolution of dentition and feeding ecology in extinct vertebrates.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,510 Research products, page 1 of 251
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Mehdi, Ali; Cheishvili, David; Arakelian, Ani; Bismar, Tarek A.; Szyf, Moshe; Rabbani, Shafaat A.;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Additional file 3: Supplementary Table 2. List of the primers used for pyrosequencing and amplicon sequencing (Illumina MiSeq system).

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Donaldson, Michael E.; Davy, Christina M.; Vanderwolf, Karen J.; Willis, Craig K. R.; Saville, Barry J.; Kyle, Christopher J.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: NSERC

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causal agent of bat white-nose syndrome (WNS), which is devastating some North American bat populations. Previous transcriptome studies provided insight regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in WNS; however, it is unclear how different environmental parameters could influence pathogenicity. This information could be useful in developing management strategies to mitigate the negative impacts of P. destructans on bats. We cultured three P. destructans isolates from Atlantic Canada on two growth media (potato dextrose agar and Sabouraud dextrose agar) that differ in their nitrogen source, and at two separate incubation temperatures (4 C and 15 C) that approximate the temperature range of bat hibernacula during the winter and a temperature within its optimal mycelial growth range. We conducted RNA sequencing to determine transcript levels in each sample and performed differential gene expression (DGE) analyses to test the influence of growth medium and incubation temperature on gene expression. We also compared our in vitro results with previous RNA-sequencing data sets generated from P. destructans growing on the wings of a susceptible host, Myotis lucifugus. Our findings point to a critical role for substrate and incubation temperature in influencing the P. destructans transcriptome. DGE analyses suggested that growth medium plays a larger role than temperature in determining P. destructans gene expression and that although the psychrophilic fungus responds to different nitrogen sources, it may have evolved for continued growth at a broad range of low temperatures. Further, our data suggest that down-regulation of the RNA-interference pathway and increased fatty acid metabolism are involved in the P. destructans–bat interaction. Finally, we speculate that to reduce the activation of host defense responses, P. destructans minimizes changes in the expression of genes encoding secreted proteins during bat colonization.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Guanxiang Liang; Nilusha Malmuthuge; Bao, Hua; Stothard, Paul; Griebel, Philip; Guan, Le;
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR , NSERC

    Regionally DE genes list. (XLSX 282Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Doucet, Jennifer; Lee, Hyun; Nethangi Udugama; Jianfeng Xu; Baoxiu Qi; Goring, Daphne;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: NSERC

    Additional file 4 Table S3. Primers Used

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Schmidtke, Daniel; Gagné, Christina L.; Kuperman, Victor; Spalding, Thomas L.; Tucker, Benjamin V.;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: SSHRC , NSERC

    Previous research has shown that compound word recognition involves selecting a relational meaning (e.g. “box for letters” for letterbox) out of a set of competing relational meanings for the same compound. We conducted five experiments to investigate the role of competition between relational meanings across visual and auditory compound word processing. In Experiment 1 conceptual relations judgments were collected for 604 English compound words. From this database we computed an information-theoretic measure of competition between conceptual relations – entropy of conceptual relations. Experiments 2 and 3 report that greater entropy (i.e. increased competition) among a set of conceptual relations leads to longer latencies for compounds in auditory lexical decision. Experiments 4 and 5 demonstrate the same result in two visual lexical decision studies. These findings provide evidence that relational meanings are constructed and evaluated during compound recognition, regardless of whether compounds are recognised via auditory or visual input.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Hyshka, Elaine; Jalene Anderson-Baron; Kamagaju Karekezi; Belle-Isle, Lynne; Elliott, Richard; Pauly, Bernie; Strike, Carol; Asbridge, Mark; Dell, Colleen; McBride, Keely; +2 more
    Publisher: Figshare
    Project: CIHR

    Provincial and territorial policy documents and indicator scores; table contains all CHARPP indicator scores from 13 provincial and territorial harm reduction policy report cards. (XLSX 57Â kb)

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Nadeau, Rachel; Byvsheva, Anastasiia; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu;
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: NSERC

    Additional File 17: File S2. Ontologizer results of significantly dysregulated proteins from t-test results in Tyanova et al.’s dataset

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Liu, Feng; Cai, Ping; Imir Metushi; Jinze Li; Nakayawa, Tetsuya; Libia Vega; Uetrecht, Jack;
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis
    Project: CIHR

    Amodiaquine (AQ) is associated with a relatively high incidence of idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI) and agranulocytosis. A previous study reported that a combination of high dose AQ and glutathione (GSH) depletion led to liver injury. However, the characteristics of this toxicity were very different from AQ-induced liver injury in humans. We developed a model of AQ-induced liver injury with characteristics similar to the injury in humans by treating mice with lower doses of AQ for several weeks. In this study we found that not only did GSH depletion not increase AQ covalent binding to hepatic proteins at this lower dose, but also it paradoxically prevented the liver injury. We extended the model to rats and found AQ treatment led to a mild delayed onset liver injury that resolved despite continued treatment with AQ. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of Kupffer cell activation, apoptosis and hepatocyte proliferation in the liver. There was also an increase in serum IL-2, IL-5, IL-9, IL-12, MCP-1 and TGFβ, but a decrease in leptin. Coincident with the elevated serum ALT, the number of liver CD4+ T-cells, IL-17 secreting cells and TH17/Treg cells increased at Week 3 and decreased during continued treatment. Increases in NK1.1+ cells and activated M2 macrophages were also observed during liver injury. These results suggest that the outcome of the liver injury was determined by the balance between effector and regulatory cells. Co-treatment with cyclosporin prevented AQ-induced liver injury, which supports an immune mechanism. Retinoic acid (RA), which has been reported to enhance natural killer (NK) cell activity, exacerbated AQ-induced liver injury. These results suggest that AQ-induced IDILI is immune mediated and the subsequent adaptation appears to represent immune tolerance.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Bassel, Laura L.; Carmon Co; Macdonald, Alaina; Sly, Laurel; McCandless, Erin E.; Hewson, Joanne; Raksha Tiwari; Shayan Sharif; Siracusa, Laura; Clark, Mary Ellen; +1 more
    Publisher: figshare
    Project: NSERC

    Additional file 13. Data.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Brink, Kirstin S.; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Ya-Na Wu; Liu, Wei-Min; Dar-Bin Shieh; Huang, Timothy D.; Chi-Kuang Sun; Reisz, Robert R.;
    Publisher: The Royal Society
    Project: NSERC

    Teeth are key to understanding the feeding ecology of both extant and extinct vertebrates. Recent studies have highlighted the previously unrecognized complexity of dinosaur dentitions and how specific tooth tissues and tooth shapes differ between taxa with different diets. However, it is unknown how the ultrastructure of these tooth tissues contributes to the differences in feeding style between taxa. In this study, we use third harmonic generation microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to examine the ultrastructure of the dentine in herbivorous and carnivorous dinosaurs to understand how the structure of this tissue contributes to the overall utility of the tooth. Morphometric analyses of dentinal tubule diameter, density and branching rates reveal a strong signal for dietary preferences, with herbivorous saurischian and ornithischian dinosaurs consistently having higher dentinal tubule density than their carnivorous relatives. We hypothesize that this relates to the hardness of the dentine, where herbivorous taxa have dentine that is more resistant to breakage and wear at the dentine–enamel junction than carnivorous taxa. This study advocates the detailed study of dentine and the use of advanced microscopy techniques to understand the evolution of dentition and feeding ecology in extinct vertebrates.