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1,480 Research products, page 1 of 148

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Haas, Christian;
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Nanaimo Free Press
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/21933/Feb27-1878.pdf?sequence=2

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Nanaimo Free Press
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/11898/Apr03-1922.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Nanaimo Free Press
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/19845/Aug29-1894.pdf?sequence=2

  • English
    Authors: 
    Amegashie, J. Atsu;
    Country: Germany
    Project: SSHRC

    In the very popular FOX TV reality show, American Idol, the judges, who are presumably experts in evaluating singing effort, have no voting power when the field is narrowed to the top twenty-four contestants. It is only the votes of viewers that count. In the 2007 season of the show, Simon Cowell, a judge and the brainchild of the show, threatened to quit the show if a contestant, Sanjaya Malakar, who was clearly a low-ability contestant, won the competition. He was concerned that the show was becoming a popularity contest instead of a singing contest. Is this a problem? Not necessarily. I show that, under certain conditions, making success in the contest dependent on a contestant’s popularity and not solely on her singing ability or performance, could paradoxically increase aggregate singing effort. It may be optimal to give the entire voting power to the viewers whose evaluation of singing effort is noisier.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Chen, Dale Zhu Dong;
    Country: Canada

    Air pollution comprised of particulate matter 10μm (PM10), particulate matter 2.5μm (PM2.5), ground level ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) has documented impacts on public health, which led governments to establish standards and regulate the emission of these airborne contaminants. In Northern British Columbia where many communities experience periods of poor air quality thorough research on resulting health impacts has not been conducted. This project sought to examine relationships between poor air quality conditions and emergency room visits in Prince George, BC by using the limited data that could be accessed due to privacy concerns. No statistically significant relationships were found individually or when considered together. However, in follow-up stakeholder interviews, respondents confirmed poor air quality links to public health issues exist and need attention. Their comments and suggestions provided a basis for recommendations to support improving air quality conditions in the Prince George airshed.

  • Other research product . 1910
    Open Access English
    Publisher: The Cowichan Leader
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/7023/July07-1910.pdf?sequence=2

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Metcalfe, Quinn Marisa Rose;
    Country: Canada

    In an international context of increasing attention to maternal health and unacceptable rates of maternal death, disease and disability in many regions of the world, more resources will become available to address the issue. In the case of maternal mortality in Uganda,framing of the issue has implications for the effectiveness of attempted interventions. While women’s subordinate status in Ugandan society has been recognized as an important contributing factor in high maternal death rates, it is largely considered to be an intractable artefact of social and cultural beliefs and practices. Interventions informed by this framework can at best hope to mitigate the effects of an unfortunate reality. The root issue of women’s lack of empowerment is therefore not often addressed within large scale maternal health interventions, contributing to a continued need for mitigation, and potentially increasing women’s social disempowerment to reinforce the cycle of poor maternal health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tonin, Jason;
    Country: Canada

    This report provides a strategic analysis of a small sized engineering firm competing in the British Columbia, Canada region. The analysis focuses on how to increase the firm’s profitability by examining its internal structure and the external environment. The analysis considered the relative growth of the industry and reviewed potential opportunities and threats. It analysed the firm’s competitiveness in each of the market segments and reviewed means by which it could increase its competitiveness. The analysis showed that the firm competes well within the current segments it operates in and has the potential to be competitive in a new market segment. The analysis developed several strategic alternatives to meet the firm’s key goals. Based on the potential of each alternative to achieve the firm’s goals a preferred option of allocating non-billable time to expanding workload was recommend. The workload expansion included the First Nations and private development segments the firm currently competes in, as well as expanding into the municipal government segment where the firm showed potential to be competitive.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Edmonds, Jeff;
    Publisher: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings. 10071 - Scheduling
    Country: Germany
    Project: NSERC

    The goal is to prove a surprising lower bound for resource augmented nonclairvoyant algorithms for scheduling jobs with sublinear nondecreasing speed-up curves on multiple processors with the objective of average response time. Edmonds and Pruhs in SODA09 prove that for every $e > 0$, there is an algorithm $alg_{e}$ that is $(1!+!epsilon)$-speed $O({1 over e2})$-competitive. A problem, however, is that this algorithm $alg_{e}$ depends on $e$. The goal is to prove that every fixed deterministic nonclairvoyant algorithm has a suboptimal speed threshold, namely for every (graceful) algorithm $alg$, there is a threshold $1!+!beta_{alg}$ that is $beta_{alg} > 0$ away from being optimal such that the algorithm is $Omega({1 over e beta_{alg}})$ competitive with speed $(1 !+! beta_{alg}) !+! e$ and is $omega(1)$ competitive with speed $1 !+! beta_{alg}$. I have worked very hard on it and have felt that I was close. The proof technique is to use Brouwer's fixed point theorem to break the cycle of needing to know which input will be given before one can know what the algorithm will do and needing to know what the algorithm will do before one can know which input to give. Every thing I have can be found at

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
1,480 Research products, page 1 of 148
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Haas, Christian;
    Country: Germany
  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Nanaimo Free Press
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/21933/Feb27-1878.pdf?sequence=2

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Nanaimo Free Press
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/11898/Apr03-1922.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: Nanaimo Free Press
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/19845/Aug29-1894.pdf?sequence=2

  • English
    Authors: 
    Amegashie, J. Atsu;
    Country: Germany
    Project: SSHRC

    In the very popular FOX TV reality show, American Idol, the judges, who are presumably experts in evaluating singing effort, have no voting power when the field is narrowed to the top twenty-four contestants. It is only the votes of viewers that count. In the 2007 season of the show, Simon Cowell, a judge and the brainchild of the show, threatened to quit the show if a contestant, Sanjaya Malakar, who was clearly a low-ability contestant, won the competition. He was concerned that the show was becoming a popularity contest instead of a singing contest. Is this a problem? Not necessarily. I show that, under certain conditions, making success in the contest dependent on a contestant’s popularity and not solely on her singing ability or performance, could paradoxically increase aggregate singing effort. It may be optimal to give the entire voting power to the viewers whose evaluation of singing effort is noisier.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Chen, Dale Zhu Dong;
    Country: Canada

    Air pollution comprised of particulate matter 10μm (PM10), particulate matter 2.5μm (PM2.5), ground level ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) has documented impacts on public health, which led governments to establish standards and regulate the emission of these airborne contaminants. In Northern British Columbia where many communities experience periods of poor air quality thorough research on resulting health impacts has not been conducted. This project sought to examine relationships between poor air quality conditions and emergency room visits in Prince George, BC by using the limited data that could be accessed due to privacy concerns. No statistically significant relationships were found individually or when considered together. However, in follow-up stakeholder interviews, respondents confirmed poor air quality links to public health issues exist and need attention. Their comments and suggestions provided a basis for recommendations to support improving air quality conditions in the Prince George airshed.

  • Other research product . 1910
    Open Access English
    Publisher: The Cowichan Leader
    Country: Canada

    https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/7023/July07-1910.pdf?sequence=2

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Metcalfe, Quinn Marisa Rose;
    Country: Canada

    In an international context of increasing attention to maternal health and unacceptable rates of maternal death, disease and disability in many regions of the world, more resources will become available to address the issue. In the case of maternal mortality in Uganda,framing of the issue has implications for the effectiveness of attempted interventions. While women’s subordinate status in Ugandan society has been recognized as an important contributing factor in high maternal death rates, it is largely considered to be an intractable artefact of social and cultural beliefs and practices. Interventions informed by this framework can at best hope to mitigate the effects of an unfortunate reality. The root issue of women’s lack of empowerment is therefore not often addressed within large scale maternal health interventions, contributing to a continued need for mitigation, and potentially increasing women’s social disempowerment to reinforce the cycle of poor maternal health.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Tonin, Jason;
    Country: Canada

    This report provides a strategic analysis of a small sized engineering firm competing in the British Columbia, Canada region. The analysis focuses on how to increase the firm’s profitability by examining its internal structure and the external environment. The analysis considered the relative growth of the industry and reviewed potential opportunities and threats. It analysed the firm’s competitiveness in each of the market segments and reviewed means by which it could increase its competitiveness. The analysis showed that the firm competes well within the current segments it operates in and has the potential to be competitive in a new market segment. The analysis developed several strategic alternatives to meet the firm’s key goals. Based on the potential of each alternative to achieve the firm’s goals a preferred option of allocating non-billable time to expanding workload was recommend. The workload expansion included the First Nations and private development segments the firm currently competes in, as well as expanding into the municipal government segment where the firm showed potential to be competitive.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Edmonds, Jeff;
    Publisher: Dagstuhl Seminar Proceedings. 10071 - Scheduling
    Country: Germany
    Project: NSERC

    The goal is to prove a surprising lower bound for resource augmented nonclairvoyant algorithms for scheduling jobs with sublinear nondecreasing speed-up curves on multiple processors with the objective of average response time. Edmonds and Pruhs in SODA09 prove that for every $e > 0$, there is an algorithm $alg_{e}$ that is $(1!+!epsilon)$-speed $O({1 over e2})$-competitive. A problem, however, is that this algorithm $alg_{e}$ depends on $e$. The goal is to prove that every fixed deterministic nonclairvoyant algorithm has a suboptimal speed threshold, namely for every (graceful) algorithm $alg$, there is a threshold $1!+!beta_{alg}$ that is $beta_{alg} > 0$ away from being optimal such that the algorithm is $Omega({1 over e beta_{alg}})$ competitive with speed $(1 !+! beta_{alg}) !+! e$ and is $omega(1)$ competitive with speed $1 !+! beta_{alg}$. I have worked very hard on it and have felt that I was close. The proof technique is to use Brouwer's fixed point theorem to break the cycle of needing to know which input will be given before one can know what the algorithm will do and needing to know what the algorithm will do before one can know which input to give. Every thing I have can be found at