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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Young, TK; Chatwood, S; Ford, J; Healey, G; Jong, M; Lavoie, J; White, M;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Canada
    Project: CIHR

    "An international conference titled 'Transforming Health Care in Remote Communities' was held at the Chateau Lacombe Hotel in Edmonton, Canada, April 28–30, 2016. The event was organized by the University of Alberta’s School of Public Health, in partnership with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, and the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, Nunavut. There were 150 registrants from 7 countries: Canada (7 provinces and 3 territories), United States, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Australia. They included representatives of academic institutions, health care agencies, government ministries, community organizations, and private industry. The Conference focused on developing solutions to address health care in remote regions. It enabled new networks to be established and existing ones consolidated." (as cited in abstract)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Croston, J.H.; Kraft, R.P.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D.M.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Penna, R.F.; Sivakoff, G.R.; Jordan, R.; Brassington, Nicola; +12 more
    Countries: Canada, United Kingdom

    We present new results on the shock around the south-west radio lobe of Centaurus A using data from the Chandra Very Large Programme observations (740 ks total observing time). The X-ray spectrum of the emission around the outer south-western edge of the lobe is well described by a single power-law model with Galactic absorption – thermal models are strongly disfavoured, except in the region closest to the nucleus. We conclude that a significant fraction of the X-ray emission around the south-west part of the lobe is synchrotron, not thermal. We infer that in the region where the shock is strongest and the ambient gas density lowest, the inflation of the lobe is accelerating particles to X-ray synchrotron emitting energies, similar to supernova remnants such as SN1006. This interpretation resolves a problem of our earlier, purely thermal, interpretation for this emission, namely that the density compression across the shock was required to be much larger than the theoretically expected factor of 4. We describe a self-consistent model for the lobe dynamics and shock properties using the shell of thermal emission to the north of the lobe to estimate the lobe pressure. Based on this model, we estimate that the lobe is expanding to the south-west with a velocity of ∼2600 km s−1 , roughly Mach 8 relative to the ambient medium. We discuss the spatial variation of spectral index across the shock region, concluding that our observations constrain γmax for the accelerated particles to be ∼108 at the strongest part of the shock, consistent with expectations from diffusive shock acceleration theory. Finally, we consider the implications of these results for the production of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and TeV emission from Centaurus A, concluding that the shock front region is unlikely to be a significant source of UHECRs, but that TeV emission from this region is expected at levels comparable to current limits at TeV energies, for plausible assumed magnetic field strengths. ‘The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com '. Copyright Blackwell Publishing / Royal Astronomical Society. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.14715.x Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhang, Z.; Gilfanov, M.; Voss, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Kraft, R. P.; Brassington, Nicola; Kundu, A.; Jordan, A.; Sarazin, C.;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Canada

    Aims. Based on the archival data from the Chandra observations of nearby galaxies, we study different sub populations of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) - dynamically formed systems in globular clusters (GCs) and in the nucleus of M 31 and (presumably primordial) X-ray binaries in the fields of galaxies. Our aim is to produce accurate luminosity distributions of X-ray binaries in different environments, suitable for quantitative comparison with each other and with the output of population synthesis calculations. Methods. Our sample includes seven nearby galaxies (M 31, Maffei 1, Centaurus A, M 81, NGC 3379, NGC 4697, and NGC 4278) and the Milky Way, which together provide relatively uniform coverage down to the luminosity limit of 10(35) erg s(-1). In total we have detected 185 LMXBs associated with GCs, 35 X-ray sources in the nucleus of M 31, and 998 field sources of which similar to 365 are expected to be background AGN. We combine these data, taking special care to accurately account for X-ray and optical incompleteness corrections and the removal of the contamination from the cosmic X-ray background sources, to produce luminosity distributions of X-ray binaries in different environments to far greater accuracy than has been obtained previously. Results. We found that luminosity distributions of GC and field LMXBs differ throughout the entire luminosity range, the fraction of faint (log(L-X) < 37) sources among the former being similar to 4 times less than in the field population. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of sources in the nucleus of M 31 is similar to that of GC sources at the faint end but differs at the bright end, with the M 31 nucleus hosting significantly fewer bright sources. We discuss the possible origin and potential implications of these results. Original article can be found at: http://www.aanda.org/ Copyright The European Southern Observatory Peer reviewed

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Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
3 Research products, page 1 of 1
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Young, TK; Chatwood, S; Ford, J; Healey, G; Jong, M; Lavoie, J; White, M;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Canada
    Project: CIHR

    "An international conference titled 'Transforming Health Care in Remote Communities' was held at the Chateau Lacombe Hotel in Edmonton, Canada, April 28–30, 2016. The event was organized by the University of Alberta’s School of Public Health, in partnership with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, and the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, Nunavut. There were 150 registrants from 7 countries: Canada (7 provinces and 3 territories), United States, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Australia. They included representatives of academic institutions, health care agencies, government ministries, community organizations, and private industry. The Conference focused on developing solutions to address health care in remote regions. It enabled new networks to be established and existing ones consolidated." (as cited in abstract)

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Croston, J.H.; Kraft, R.P.; Hardcastle, M.J.; Birkinshaw, M.; Worrall, D.M.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Penna, R.F.; Sivakoff, G.R.; Jordan, R.; Brassington, Nicola; +12 more
    Countries: Canada, United Kingdom

    We present new results on the shock around the south-west radio lobe of Centaurus A using data from the Chandra Very Large Programme observations (740 ks total observing time). The X-ray spectrum of the emission around the outer south-western edge of the lobe is well described by a single power-law model with Galactic absorption – thermal models are strongly disfavoured, except in the region closest to the nucleus. We conclude that a significant fraction of the X-ray emission around the south-west part of the lobe is synchrotron, not thermal. We infer that in the region where the shock is strongest and the ambient gas density lowest, the inflation of the lobe is accelerating particles to X-ray synchrotron emitting energies, similar to supernova remnants such as SN1006. This interpretation resolves a problem of our earlier, purely thermal, interpretation for this emission, namely that the density compression across the shock was required to be much larger than the theoretically expected factor of 4. We describe a self-consistent model for the lobe dynamics and shock properties using the shell of thermal emission to the north of the lobe to estimate the lobe pressure. Based on this model, we estimate that the lobe is expanding to the south-west with a velocity of ∼2600 km s−1 , roughly Mach 8 relative to the ambient medium. We discuss the spatial variation of spectral index across the shock region, concluding that our observations constrain γmax for the accelerated particles to be ∼108 at the strongest part of the shock, consistent with expectations from diffusive shock acceleration theory. Finally, we consider the implications of these results for the production of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and TeV emission from Centaurus A, concluding that the shock front region is unlikely to be a significant source of UHECRs, but that TeV emission from this region is expected at levels comparable to current limits at TeV energies, for plausible assumed magnetic field strengths. ‘The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com '. Copyright Blackwell Publishing / Royal Astronomical Society. DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.14715.x Peer reviewed

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Zhang, Z.; Gilfanov, M.; Voss, R.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Kraft, R. P.; Brassington, Nicola; Kundu, A.; Jordan, A.; Sarazin, C.;
    Countries: United Kingdom, Canada

    Aims. Based on the archival data from the Chandra observations of nearby galaxies, we study different sub populations of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) - dynamically formed systems in globular clusters (GCs) and in the nucleus of M 31 and (presumably primordial) X-ray binaries in the fields of galaxies. Our aim is to produce accurate luminosity distributions of X-ray binaries in different environments, suitable for quantitative comparison with each other and with the output of population synthesis calculations. Methods. Our sample includes seven nearby galaxies (M 31, Maffei 1, Centaurus A, M 81, NGC 3379, NGC 4697, and NGC 4278) and the Milky Way, which together provide relatively uniform coverage down to the luminosity limit of 10(35) erg s(-1). In total we have detected 185 LMXBs associated with GCs, 35 X-ray sources in the nucleus of M 31, and 998 field sources of which similar to 365 are expected to be background AGN. We combine these data, taking special care to accurately account for X-ray and optical incompleteness corrections and the removal of the contamination from the cosmic X-ray background sources, to produce luminosity distributions of X-ray binaries in different environments to far greater accuracy than has been obtained previously. Results. We found that luminosity distributions of GC and field LMXBs differ throughout the entire luminosity range, the fraction of faint (log(L-X) < 37) sources among the former being similar to 4 times less than in the field population. The X-ray luminosity function (XLF) of sources in the nucleus of M 31 is similar to that of GC sources at the faint end but differs at the bright end, with the M 31 nucleus hosting significantly fewer bright sources. We discuss the possible origin and potential implications of these results. Original article can be found at: http://www.aanda.org/ Copyright The European Southern Observatory Peer reviewed