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134 Research products, page 1 of 14

  • Canada
  • Other research products
  • 2021-2021
  • English
  • VIUSpace

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  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stewart Ryan, Sherry;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Berberis thunbergii. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25209/StewartRyan2.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Plante, Sylvie;
    Country: Canada

    This synthesis paper introduces a conceptual model which explains how boundary spanning practices use relational, cognitive and structural social capital to facilitate innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Social capital is a multidimensional concept used by scholars from different disciplines to demonstrate the benefits of accessing resources through relationships in social networks. Past research has shown that social capital can accelerate positive innovation outcomes for organizations facing complex challenges, including PPPs that seek to share costs, resources and risks across sectors to develop and sustain competitive advantage. In practice, many PPPs fail to achieve anticipated innovation outcomes, due in part to a breakdown of social relations between partners. The conceptual model is described and illustrated across three components of the dissertation by portfolio: Journal article, online course/learning module and instructional video. Based on results of a qualitative research study that investigated critical incidents on innovation projects in PPPs from the perspectives of public and private sector innovators, the model identifies practices that help leaders across sectors find ways to collaborate more effectively to manage innovation. Three modes of inference were used to analyse interview data, which referenced different industries and types of innovation, producing a holistic understanding of the interaction of social capital and innovation in PPPs. A critical realist, interdisciplinary approach combined theory and empirical data to identify generative mechanisms of innovation outcomes on PPP projects. A knowledge dissemination section describes how the research findings are being made accessible to meet the needs of practitioners as well as academic researchers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ashton Wagner, Doreen;
    Country: Canada

    Purpose – This study draws from ecological systems theory (EST) as the conceptual basis to answer the question: what affects the entrepreneurial resilience of rural women business owners in a time of crisis? Design/methodology/approach – Evidence was gathered from two in-depth interviews with each of 13 participants, three months apart, during the 2020-2021 pandemic. Thematic analysis was applied, along with measures to ensure trustworthiness. Findings – Immediate social contexts challenged entrepreneurial resilience with family care obligations, homeschooling, and unsupportive close relationships. Certain institutional contexts such as enterprises’ industry and business models also demanded more resilience – with healthcare and in-person-only retail operations being most affected. Beyond contexts, entrepreneurial resilience ebbed and flowed with recursive ecosystem interactions especially with close, personal relationships. Business owners demonstrated agency with coping strategies to bolster resilience including focusing on community and collaboration, employing clarity around roles to navigate business and personal commitments, appropriate distancing from ecosystem relationships at critical times, and strategic application of new ways of doing business to accommodate COVID restrictions. Originality/value – This study is unique in that it was conducted as a significant health and economic crisis was unfolding, offering insight into the development of entrepreneurial resilience, over time, and focusing on a relatively unexplored field of rural women entrepreneurship. Keywords – Resilience, Entrepreneurial resilience, Women entrepreneurs, Rural entrepreneurs, Ecological systems theory Paper Type – Research paper

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kipot, Nina;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Paeonia lactiflora. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25204/Kipot.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atleo, Tyson;
    Country: Canada

    Clayoquot Sound is a remarkable and rare coastal temperate rainforest ecosystem on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. It is home to the Indigenous Ahousaht Nation and a place where chinook salmon and people are interdependent. The health and well-being of the Ahousaht community have been reliant on the Nation’s relationship to salmon for many generations. The Ahousaht stewarded the chinook salmon in the Megin River successfully and sustainably for generations through their complex traditional Indigenous legal system. Now, the genetically diverse population of chinook salmon in the Megin River is on the verge of extinction as the salmon face several human-caused ecological and socio-political threats. In this paper, I specifically explored the relationship between the decline of Megin River chinook salmon and the decline of Ahousaht traditional law as a wicked problem. I used a qualitative approach that combines Indigenous and Western methodologies, such as: systems thinking; describing the biophysical and socio-cultural attributes of the Megin River; ethnographic interviews with knowledge holders; developing a framework for articulating the traditional Ahousaht legal system; and, making recommendations to address the problem. I concluded that the timeline of replacing the traditional Ahousaht legal system (a legal system of spiritual and natural characteristics derived from the Ahousaht relationship to life-giving forces in the region) with that of Canadian law (a legal system of economic and social policy foreign to the natural cycles of the region) corresponds directly with the decline of the Megin River chinook and should be considered as one of the causes of decline. I recommend that additional research be conducted using a systems thinking approach to identify where systemic interventions are required to build new relationships, structures, and institutions that uphold Indigenous knowledge and legal frameworks to address conservation challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hoffe, Samuel;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Winning essay - English Department Competition 2021-2022 Winning essay - English Department Competition ENGL 115 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26017/Hoffe.pdf?sequence=4&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Millward, Steve;
    Country: Canada

    Front-line maintenance supervisors play a key role at BC Transit, as this role directly interacts with and oversees front-line staff. These front-line leaders are responsible for overseeing most of the organization’s communications and change initiatives. This research investigates the front-line leadership role that organizations rely on as their main conduit for communication of organizational goals and change management initiatives to front-line staff. Front-line leadership roles are the roles in an organization that deal directly with the front-line staff daily. This research investigated the challenges a front-line leader can face while working in this role. This research study engaged BC Transit’s front-line maintenance supervisors and the front-line staff from two different sites within the greater Victoria, British Columbia area. The main research question asked was, “how can BC Transit assist in the development of front-line maintenance supervisors so that they develop the capabilities and skills to lead front-line staff effectively?” Based on this overarching research question, data was collected from a focus group and an online survey that revealed five themes: define and document roles and responsibilities, strengthen hiring processes, develop formal training, focus on team-building and resolve communication barriers. Recommendations offer strategies for the development of front-line leaders, including enhancing overall support for front-line leaders and relationships between front-line leaders and the front-line staff. Keywords: front-line leadership, communication, development, relationships, roles and responsibilities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sorensen, Melina Rose;
    Country: Canada

    Microplastics are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and have negatively impacted marine biota and ecosystem health. The Salish Sea, an inland sea ranging from Vancouver to Puget Sound, is an ecologically significant ecosystem. This study determined the areas in the Northern Salish Sea in which microplastics are likely to accumulate and subsequently where they are likely to cause ecological harm. Modelling and weighted raster analysis was performed using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Areas of highest risk were identified, four key ecological areas of concern in relation to the results were investigated, and the potential impacts of microplastics on two key sensitive species (southern resident killer whales and Chinook salmon) were discussed. By identifying vulnerable areas and where microplastics are likely to accumulate, the results could be helpful for conservation managers, fisheries management, and natural resource managers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Coulthard, Chris James Wilson;
    Country: Canada

    The city of Toronto is experiencing rapid growth in vertical settlement patterns with the construction of very tall high-rise residential buildings that are classified as super high-rise’s by the Ontario Building Code. Due to their height and complexity, SHR buildings present challenges for firefighters during firefighting operations. This research study was conducted to explore the preparedness of firefighters to these vulnerabilities which can impact life-safety and what limits or support preparedness. Using a mixed methods sequential design, a survey questionnaire was distributed to Toronto Fire Service firefighters, and this was followed by interviews; the survey and interviews explored firefighter risk perception, technical and environmental knowledge, training, and preparedness capacities. The findings suggested there were differences in commands and districts with respect to these measurable properties, and firefighters were also split in their perception of risk. In conclusion, the influencing factors that support or limit preparedness are leadership, technical and environmental knowledge, training, and budgetary and organizational priorities. Optimism bias and technical and environmental knowledge were found to influence firefighters’ risk perception and their ability to accurately assess risk. Keywords: Super high-rise, preparedness, risk perception, vulnerabilities, training, technical and environmental knowledge, capacity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Niroo, Farnoosh; Van Winkle, Christine;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In recent years, novel and innovative ways to accommodate diners and visitors’ desire for new experiences have emerged (Warnaby & Shi, 2018). Pop-up restaurants are indicative of this growing trend to provide an appealing combination of experiences and food. Considering the temporary nature of pop-up restaurants, it is important to understand diners’ perceptions regarding the multiple dimensions of the pop-up dining experience compared to traditional dining-in restaurants. By taking a qualitative approach, this study explored diners’ perspectives of their experiences at pop-up restaurants. Semi-structured interviews were used to get a deep understanding of diners’ perceptions about various aspects of their pop-up dining experiences. An interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006) was conducted to answer two main research questions: 1) Is pop-up dining a memorable and meaningful experience compared to a traditional dining experience? 2) What are the qualities that create a memorable and meaningful pop-up restaurant experience? The findings demonstrate that the qualities which create a meaningful pop-up dining experience relate not only to the values offered by pop-up restaurants, but also to the personal values of the diners themselves. The connection between the value offered by the restaurant and the value perceived by diners is co-created and results in achieving experiential benefits for the diners. A model was proposed, based on the Service-Dominant Logic framework (Vargo & Lusch, 2008), to represent the co-creation of the experience at pop-up restaurants. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25241/Niroo&VanWinkle.pdf?sequence=3

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
134 Research products, page 1 of 14
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stewart Ryan, Sherry;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Berberis thunbergii. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25209/StewartRyan2.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Plante, Sylvie;
    Country: Canada

    This synthesis paper introduces a conceptual model which explains how boundary spanning practices use relational, cognitive and structural social capital to facilitate innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Social capital is a multidimensional concept used by scholars from different disciplines to demonstrate the benefits of accessing resources through relationships in social networks. Past research has shown that social capital can accelerate positive innovation outcomes for organizations facing complex challenges, including PPPs that seek to share costs, resources and risks across sectors to develop and sustain competitive advantage. In practice, many PPPs fail to achieve anticipated innovation outcomes, due in part to a breakdown of social relations between partners. The conceptual model is described and illustrated across three components of the dissertation by portfolio: Journal article, online course/learning module and instructional video. Based on results of a qualitative research study that investigated critical incidents on innovation projects in PPPs from the perspectives of public and private sector innovators, the model identifies practices that help leaders across sectors find ways to collaborate more effectively to manage innovation. Three modes of inference were used to analyse interview data, which referenced different industries and types of innovation, producing a holistic understanding of the interaction of social capital and innovation in PPPs. A critical realist, interdisciplinary approach combined theory and empirical data to identify generative mechanisms of innovation outcomes on PPP projects. A knowledge dissemination section describes how the research findings are being made accessible to meet the needs of practitioners as well as academic researchers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ashton Wagner, Doreen;
    Country: Canada

    Purpose – This study draws from ecological systems theory (EST) as the conceptual basis to answer the question: what affects the entrepreneurial resilience of rural women business owners in a time of crisis? Design/methodology/approach – Evidence was gathered from two in-depth interviews with each of 13 participants, three months apart, during the 2020-2021 pandemic. Thematic analysis was applied, along with measures to ensure trustworthiness. Findings – Immediate social contexts challenged entrepreneurial resilience with family care obligations, homeschooling, and unsupportive close relationships. Certain institutional contexts such as enterprises’ industry and business models also demanded more resilience – with healthcare and in-person-only retail operations being most affected. Beyond contexts, entrepreneurial resilience ebbed and flowed with recursive ecosystem interactions especially with close, personal relationships. Business owners demonstrated agency with coping strategies to bolster resilience including focusing on community and collaboration, employing clarity around roles to navigate business and personal commitments, appropriate distancing from ecosystem relationships at critical times, and strategic application of new ways of doing business to accommodate COVID restrictions. Originality/value – This study is unique in that it was conducted as a significant health and economic crisis was unfolding, offering insight into the development of entrepreneurial resilience, over time, and focusing on a relatively unexplored field of rural women entrepreneurship. Keywords – Resilience, Entrepreneurial resilience, Women entrepreneurs, Rural entrepreneurs, Ecological systems theory Paper Type – Research paper

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kipot, Nina;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Paeonia lactiflora. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25204/Kipot.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atleo, Tyson;
    Country: Canada

    Clayoquot Sound is a remarkable and rare coastal temperate rainforest ecosystem on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. It is home to the Indigenous Ahousaht Nation and a place where chinook salmon and people are interdependent. The health and well-being of the Ahousaht community have been reliant on the Nation’s relationship to salmon for many generations. The Ahousaht stewarded the chinook salmon in the Megin River successfully and sustainably for generations through their complex traditional Indigenous legal system. Now, the genetically diverse population of chinook salmon in the Megin River is on the verge of extinction as the salmon face several human-caused ecological and socio-political threats. In this paper, I specifically explored the relationship between the decline of Megin River chinook salmon and the decline of Ahousaht traditional law as a wicked problem. I used a qualitative approach that combines Indigenous and Western methodologies, such as: systems thinking; describing the biophysical and socio-cultural attributes of the Megin River; ethnographic interviews with knowledge holders; developing a framework for articulating the traditional Ahousaht legal system; and, making recommendations to address the problem. I concluded that the timeline of replacing the traditional Ahousaht legal system (a legal system of spiritual and natural characteristics derived from the Ahousaht relationship to life-giving forces in the region) with that of Canadian law (a legal system of economic and social policy foreign to the natural cycles of the region) corresponds directly with the decline of the Megin River chinook and should be considered as one of the causes of decline. I recommend that additional research be conducted using a systems thinking approach to identify where systemic interventions are required to build new relationships, structures, and institutions that uphold Indigenous knowledge and legal frameworks to address conservation challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hoffe, Samuel;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Winning essay - English Department Competition 2021-2022 Winning essay - English Department Competition ENGL 115 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26017/Hoffe.pdf?sequence=4&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Millward, Steve;
    Country: Canada

    Front-line maintenance supervisors play a key role at BC Transit, as this role directly interacts with and oversees front-line staff. These front-line leaders are responsible for overseeing most of the organization’s communications and change initiatives. This research investigates the front-line leadership role that organizations rely on as their main conduit for communication of organizational goals and change management initiatives to front-line staff. Front-line leadership roles are the roles in an organization that deal directly with the front-line staff daily. This research investigated the challenges a front-line leader can face while working in this role. This research study engaged BC Transit’s front-line maintenance supervisors and the front-line staff from two different sites within the greater Victoria, British Columbia area. The main research question asked was, “how can BC Transit assist in the development of front-line maintenance supervisors so that they develop the capabilities and skills to lead front-line staff effectively?” Based on this overarching research question, data was collected from a focus group and an online survey that revealed five themes: define and document roles and responsibilities, strengthen hiring processes, develop formal training, focus on team-building and resolve communication barriers. Recommendations offer strategies for the development of front-line leaders, including enhancing overall support for front-line leaders and relationships between front-line leaders and the front-line staff. Keywords: front-line leadership, communication, development, relationships, roles and responsibilities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sorensen, Melina Rose;
    Country: Canada

    Microplastics are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and have negatively impacted marine biota and ecosystem health. The Salish Sea, an inland sea ranging from Vancouver to Puget Sound, is an ecologically significant ecosystem. This study determined the areas in the Northern Salish Sea in which microplastics are likely to accumulate and subsequently where they are likely to cause ecological harm. Modelling and weighted raster analysis was performed using Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Areas of highest risk were identified, four key ecological areas of concern in relation to the results were investigated, and the potential impacts of microplastics on two key sensitive species (southern resident killer whales and Chinook salmon) were discussed. By identifying vulnerable areas and where microplastics are likely to accumulate, the results could be helpful for conservation managers, fisheries management, and natural resource managers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Coulthard, Chris James Wilson;
    Country: Canada

    The city of Toronto is experiencing rapid growth in vertical settlement patterns with the construction of very tall high-rise residential buildings that are classified as super high-rise’s by the Ontario Building Code. Due to their height and complexity, SHR buildings present challenges for firefighters during firefighting operations. This research study was conducted to explore the preparedness of firefighters to these vulnerabilities which can impact life-safety and what limits or support preparedness. Using a mixed methods sequential design, a survey questionnaire was distributed to Toronto Fire Service firefighters, and this was followed by interviews; the survey and interviews explored firefighter risk perception, technical and environmental knowledge, training, and preparedness capacities. The findings suggested there were differences in commands and districts with respect to these measurable properties, and firefighters were also split in their perception of risk. In conclusion, the influencing factors that support or limit preparedness are leadership, technical and environmental knowledge, training, and budgetary and organizational priorities. Optimism bias and technical and environmental knowledge were found to influence firefighters’ risk perception and their ability to accurately assess risk. Keywords: Super high-rise, preparedness, risk perception, vulnerabilities, training, technical and environmental knowledge, capacity.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Niroo, Farnoosh; Van Winkle, Christine;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In recent years, novel and innovative ways to accommodate diners and visitors’ desire for new experiences have emerged (Warnaby & Shi, 2018). Pop-up restaurants are indicative of this growing trend to provide an appealing combination of experiences and food. Considering the temporary nature of pop-up restaurants, it is important to understand diners’ perceptions regarding the multiple dimensions of the pop-up dining experience compared to traditional dining-in restaurants. By taking a qualitative approach, this study explored diners’ perspectives of their experiences at pop-up restaurants. Semi-structured interviews were used to get a deep understanding of diners’ perceptions about various aspects of their pop-up dining experiences. An interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006) was conducted to answer two main research questions: 1) Is pop-up dining a memorable and meaningful experience compared to a traditional dining experience? 2) What are the qualities that create a memorable and meaningful pop-up restaurant experience? The findings demonstrate that the qualities which create a meaningful pop-up dining experience relate not only to the values offered by pop-up restaurants, but also to the personal values of the diners themselves. The connection between the value offered by the restaurant and the value perceived by diners is co-created and results in achieving experiential benefits for the diners. A model was proposed, based on the Service-Dominant Logic framework (Vargo & Lusch, 2008), to represent the co-creation of the experience at pop-up restaurants. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25241/Niroo&VanWinkle.pdf?sequence=3