search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
311 Research products, page 1 of 32

  • Canada
  • Other research products
  • 2017-2021
  • VIUSpace

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stewart Ryan, Sherry;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Berberis thunbergii. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25209/StewartRyan2.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada
    Project: SSHRC

    Helping families play: Development of a framework for family recreation programming / Sarah Taylor Agate, Joel Agate, & Dorothy Schmalz -- The social practice of care hotel vacations / Bertine Bargeman, Greg Richards, & Marleen van Charante-Stoffelen -- Creating a logical model of positive youth development through a multiple instrumental case study / Evan Webb & George Karlis -- Organizational revitalization: A case study of a leisure professional association creating an action plan for change - part 2 / Melissa Weddel & Jana Joy James -- Work integrated learning as a tool for therapeutic recreation students in the first year of their undergraduate degree / Charlise Bennett & Stewart Alford -- Journey to Churchill interpretive exhibit case study: Innovation in evaluation / Jill N.H. Bueddefeld, Christine M. Van Winkle, & Mary Benbow -- Edmonton's WinterCity strategy: Enhancing winter living through innovative leisure practice in a northern Canadian city / Elizabeth A. Halpenny & Nicole L. Vaugeois The World Leisure Centre of Excellence at Vancouver Island University is privileged to share its third volume of Case Studies, as part of the Innovative Leisure Practices series. Our intention, with the release of this volume, is to share examples of innovative practices in leisure and to provide a platform for the exchange of ideas and discussion around these varied examples. The cases presented in the 2018 edition of Innovative Leisure Practices are varied in nature, and represent a diverse range of relevant interests and practices. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/19902/Vol3-2018.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    Preface -- Leisure education for youth with a lived experience of mental illness, development of the FRESH [Fun Recreation Exercise and Skills for Health] program for a youth cohort in Western Sydney, Australia / Manali Hiteshkumar Shah, Stewart Alford, & Dafna Merom -- Kink as a form of leisure: Kinky events and the people who love them / Craig Webster & Stanislav Ivanov -- Measuring community engagement: A case study of Livingston (Calgary, Alberta) / Dwayne P. Sheehan & Diala F. Ammar -- Raising the Curtain: At the intersection of education, art, health care and lived experience of dementia / Ania Landy & Colleen Reid -- Improving communities through innovative financing: A case study of the Baileys Trail System / Danny Twilley, Dawn McCarthy, & Seth Brown It is the honour of the World Leisure Centre of Excellence at Vancouver Island University to share the fourth volume of case studies that comprise the Innovative Leisure Practices series. As with previous volumes in the series, the intent is to share examples of unique and innovative practice in leisure, and to encourage discussion around these varied examples. The cases presented herein are eclectic in nature, and represent a very diverse set of important interests, communities, and practices. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23389/wlce-case-volume-4-2020.pdf?sequence=3

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kipot, Nina;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Paeonia lactiflora. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25204/Kipot.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Keats, Beth;
    Country: Canada

    Impact assessment and resource management practices grapple with knowledge and research drawn across paradigms, disciplines, and cultures. In this lies the central challenge of managing developments, especially where Indigenous rights are concerned, and it is this aspect of impact assessment most widely regarded as a failure. The legitimacy of environmental impact assessment rests on the way in which research design and outcomes cope with disciplinary fault lines and different knowledge systems. This thesis explores community-based monitoring (CBM) as an emergent trans-disciplinary methodology for Indigenous knowledge inclusion in resource management. I ask: what are the key challenges of CBM as a pathway for meaningful inclusion of Indigenous knowledge into resource management decisions? I explore this question through a review of literature on the history of Indigenous knowledge and land use research methods and the inclusion of Indigenous knowledge in resource management. Through semi-directed interviews with practitioners, I explore two case studies: the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board Community Based Monitoring Network; and programs run by the Łutsel K’e Dene First Nation in the co-management setting of the Government of the Northwest Territories. Challenges to mobilizing knowledge from Indigenous research participants to co-management resource management decisions are fraught with issues of knowledge authority and epistemological differences, issues of reductionist representation of Indigenous knowledge, interdisciplinary tension, lack of clarity on information needs and research method design, and issues of information control and data autonomy. The CBM programs explored demonstrate active transformation of the legacies of extractive research through the use of technology and data sharing controls that adhere to the principles of Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession (OCAP ®), and by creating information that is gathered by and made legible to Indigenous harvesters. I show that decision-making structures must adapt to new kinds of information flowing from CBM. To do this, practitioners must step outside dominant science-based modes of knowledge production and evaluation to recognize evidence produced by integrated or interdisciplinary approaches. CBM can be a forum to re-imagine how evidence is made, what constitutes expertise, and how research can and should serve communities. It holds great potential for making and moving knowledge to better understand complex socio-ecological issues, inform decisions, and track their effectiveness.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gass, Rebecca Joelle;
    Country: Canada

    This research study explores popular culture through visual music media, specifically Beyoncé’s 2016 visual album titled Lemonade. Through a social constructionist lens, a phenomenological approach, and by incorporating psychoanalytic film theory, critical theory, feminist theory, and Black feminist theory, this study aims to uncover what aspects of visual music media empower youth girls aged 15-19 years. Through film-elicited interviews and digital focus groups, this study engaged with 11 youth girls from across Canada about what makes and does not make them feel empowered while viewing music videos. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to produce results which included three sensitizing concepts named cloak of competence, cloak of incompetence and generational language along with five emerging themes, listed as voice, unity, persistence, compassion and relatability Thematic results outlined visual, auditory, and metaphorical phenomena that empower and disempower youth girls. Empowering aspects to visual music media included visual depictions of voice, unity, auditory depictions of compassion and persistence, and a sense of relatability between the artist, situation, emotion, or setting.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borrowman, Laurel;
    Country: Canada
    Project: SSHRC

    Digital media consumption of magazines is becoming increasingly ubiquitous, yet print remains significant in this genre. The purpose of this study is to determine a model of publishing in which an independent magazine’s printed form can be made more viable because of its digital components, not despite them. Using a strengths-based approach, the study is based in semi-structured interviews with the publishers of eight independent magazines that have used both print and digital media in their publishing practices, exploring themes like motivation, creative freedom, creative control, and career development. Then, the data was sorted through the lens of McLuhan’s “laws of media” tetrad model, allowing for analysis of what is enhanced, obsolesced, retrieved, and reversed in this hybrid publishing model, with the aim of showing what each component can effectively bring in order to support the print edition and to integrate the digital components. The results inform the design and framework of a magazine publishing model in which the print issue is the focus, with support from the digital components. Any independent magazine can apply the results to its current practices or use them to launch a new hybrid offering.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Plante, Sylvie;
    Country: Canada

    This synthesis paper introduces a conceptual model which explains how boundary spanning practices use relational, cognitive and structural social capital to facilitate innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Social capital is a multidimensional concept used by scholars from different disciplines to demonstrate the benefits of accessing resources through relationships in social networks. Past research has shown that social capital can accelerate positive innovation outcomes for organizations facing complex challenges, including PPPs that seek to share costs, resources and risks across sectors to develop and sustain competitive advantage. In practice, many PPPs fail to achieve anticipated innovation outcomes, due in part to a breakdown of social relations between partners. The conceptual model is described and illustrated across three components of the dissertation by portfolio: Journal article, online course/learning module and instructional video. Based on results of a qualitative research study that investigated critical incidents on innovation projects in PPPs from the perspectives of public and private sector innovators, the model identifies practices that help leaders across sectors find ways to collaborate more effectively to manage innovation. Three modes of inference were used to analyse interview data, which referenced different industries and types of innovation, producing a holistic understanding of the interaction of social capital and innovation in PPPs. A critical realist, interdisciplinary approach combined theory and empirical data to identify generative mechanisms of innovation outcomes on PPP projects. A knowledge dissemination section describes how the research findings are being made accessible to meet the needs of practitioners as well as academic researchers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botica, Tony;
    Country: Canada

    This research is focused at the sites of Tumbo Island North and Tumbo Cliff (both on Tumbo Island within the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve [GINPR]), with supplemental data from Rocky Point Department of National Defense (DND) and Garry oak Preserve on Vancouver Island, and Waldron Island in Washington State. Field data is overlaid with a literature review of First Nations’ land management practices and acknowledges First Nations’ use of wildfire on traditional landscapes. Results comparing 2010 to 2018 vegetation data indicate an overall increase in exotic and native species and a net negative effect of fire application. Fuel loading levels are higher than expected and have a direct relationship to fire behaviour outputs. Canopy cover has a positive net effect on native species in grass strata and exotic species in forest strata and a negative net effect if found on exotic species in grass strata and native species in forest strata. An additional product of this research is a restoration plan for Tumbo Island North, which includes a comprehensive burn plan for reintroducing fire to Garry oak (Quercus garryana or p’hwulhp ) ecosystems with an aim to restoration, and with specific prescriptions for reducing conifer encroachment, reducing forest fuel loading, increasing oak sapling regeneration and survival, and increasing plant diversity of native plant species. This restoration plan can serve as a model that can be adapted and used at other Garry oak ecosystem sites. p’hwulhp is the Hul’qumi’num word for Garry oak (Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group, 2011,p.10).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Quian, Kellie;
    Country: Canada

    This thesis used an action research process to formulate actionable strategies that Clinical Knowledge and Content Management (CKCM) leaders could use to support their nonclinical staff through change. This study explored the following main inquiry question: How can Clinical Knowledge and Content Management staff in Alberta Health Services be effectively supported as they work toward the implementation of new roles and responsibilities? A sequential mixed-methods approach was applied using semistructured interviews, a survey, and a group interview. The three main themes emerged from the data: workplace flexibility, decision-making inclusion, and meetings with management. The project recommendations focus on distinguishing what flexibility means to CKCM staff and creating more opportunity for it in the workplace, adopting a catchball process to incorporate CKCM staff in workplace decisions and creating a structured schedule for staff to meet with management. This study adhered to the Royal Roads University (2019) Research Ethics Policy.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
311 Research products, page 1 of 32
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stewart Ryan, Sherry;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Berberis thunbergii. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25209/StewartRyan2.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada
    Project: SSHRC

    Helping families play: Development of a framework for family recreation programming / Sarah Taylor Agate, Joel Agate, & Dorothy Schmalz -- The social practice of care hotel vacations / Bertine Bargeman, Greg Richards, & Marleen van Charante-Stoffelen -- Creating a logical model of positive youth development through a multiple instrumental case study / Evan Webb & George Karlis -- Organizational revitalization: A case study of a leisure professional association creating an action plan for change - part 2 / Melissa Weddel & Jana Joy James -- Work integrated learning as a tool for therapeutic recreation students in the first year of their undergraduate degree / Charlise Bennett & Stewart Alford -- Journey to Churchill interpretive exhibit case study: Innovation in evaluation / Jill N.H. Bueddefeld, Christine M. Van Winkle, & Mary Benbow -- Edmonton's WinterCity strategy: Enhancing winter living through innovative leisure practice in a northern Canadian city / Elizabeth A. Halpenny & Nicole L. Vaugeois The World Leisure Centre of Excellence at Vancouver Island University is privileged to share its third volume of Case Studies, as part of the Innovative Leisure Practices series. Our intention, with the release of this volume, is to share examples of innovative practices in leisure and to provide a platform for the exchange of ideas and discussion around these varied examples. The cases presented in the 2018 edition of Innovative Leisure Practices are varied in nature, and represent a diverse range of relevant interests and practices. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/19902/Vol3-2018.pdf?sequence=3

  • Open Access English
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    Preface -- Leisure education for youth with a lived experience of mental illness, development of the FRESH [Fun Recreation Exercise and Skills for Health] program for a youth cohort in Western Sydney, Australia / Manali Hiteshkumar Shah, Stewart Alford, & Dafna Merom -- Kink as a form of leisure: Kinky events and the people who love them / Craig Webster & Stanislav Ivanov -- Measuring community engagement: A case study of Livingston (Calgary, Alberta) / Dwayne P. Sheehan & Diala F. Ammar -- Raising the Curtain: At the intersection of education, art, health care and lived experience of dementia / Ania Landy & Colleen Reid -- Improving communities through innovative financing: A case study of the Baileys Trail System / Danny Twilley, Dawn McCarthy, & Seth Brown It is the honour of the World Leisure Centre of Excellence at Vancouver Island University to share the fourth volume of case studies that comprise the Innovative Leisure Practices series. As with previous volumes in the series, the intent is to share examples of unique and innovative practice in leisure, and to encourage discussion around these varied examples. The cases presented herein are eclectic in nature, and represent a very diverse set of important interests, communities, and practices. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/23389/wlce-case-volume-4-2020.pdf?sequence=3

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kipot, Nina;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Paeonia lactiflora. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25204/Kipot.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Keats, Beth;
    Country: Canada

    Impact assessment and resource management practices grapple with knowledge and research drawn across paradigms, disciplines, and cultures. In this lies the central challenge of managing developments, especially where Indigenous rights are concerned, and it is this aspect of impact assessment most widely regarded as a failure. The legitimacy of environmental impact assessment rests on the way in which research design and outcomes cope with disciplinary fault lines and different knowledge systems. This thesis explores community-based monitoring (CBM) as an emergent trans-disciplinary methodology for Indigenous knowledge inclusion in resource management. I ask: what are the key challenges of CBM as a pathway for meaningful inclusion of Indigenous knowledge into resource management decisions? I explore this question through a review of literature on the history of Indigenous knowledge and land use research methods and the inclusion of Indigenous knowledge in resource management. Through semi-directed interviews with practitioners, I explore two case studies: the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board Community Based Monitoring Network; and programs run by the Łutsel K’e Dene First Nation in the co-management setting of the Government of the Northwest Territories. Challenges to mobilizing knowledge from Indigenous research participants to co-management resource management decisions are fraught with issues of knowledge authority and epistemological differences, issues of reductionist representation of Indigenous knowledge, interdisciplinary tension, lack of clarity on information needs and research method design, and issues of information control and data autonomy. The CBM programs explored demonstrate active transformation of the legacies of extractive research through the use of technology and data sharing controls that adhere to the principles of Ownership, Control, Access, and Possession (OCAP ®), and by creating information that is gathered by and made legible to Indigenous harvesters. I show that decision-making structures must adapt to new kinds of information flowing from CBM. To do this, practitioners must step outside dominant science-based modes of knowledge production and evaluation to recognize evidence produced by integrated or interdisciplinary approaches. CBM can be a forum to re-imagine how evidence is made, what constitutes expertise, and how research can and should serve communities. It holds great potential for making and moving knowledge to better understand complex socio-ecological issues, inform decisions, and track their effectiveness.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Gass, Rebecca Joelle;
    Country: Canada

    This research study explores popular culture through visual music media, specifically Beyoncé’s 2016 visual album titled Lemonade. Through a social constructionist lens, a phenomenological approach, and by incorporating psychoanalytic film theory, critical theory, feminist theory, and Black feminist theory, this study aims to uncover what aspects of visual music media empower youth girls aged 15-19 years. Through film-elicited interviews and digital focus groups, this study engaged with 11 youth girls from across Canada about what makes and does not make them feel empowered while viewing music videos. Qualitative thematic analysis was used to produce results which included three sensitizing concepts named cloak of competence, cloak of incompetence and generational language along with five emerging themes, listed as voice, unity, persistence, compassion and relatability Thematic results outlined visual, auditory, and metaphorical phenomena that empower and disempower youth girls. Empowering aspects to visual music media included visual depictions of voice, unity, auditory depictions of compassion and persistence, and a sense of relatability between the artist, situation, emotion, or setting.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Borrowman, Laurel;
    Country: Canada
    Project: SSHRC

    Digital media consumption of magazines is becoming increasingly ubiquitous, yet print remains significant in this genre. The purpose of this study is to determine a model of publishing in which an independent magazine’s printed form can be made more viable because of its digital components, not despite them. Using a strengths-based approach, the study is based in semi-structured interviews with the publishers of eight independent magazines that have used both print and digital media in their publishing practices, exploring themes like motivation, creative freedom, creative control, and career development. Then, the data was sorted through the lens of McLuhan’s “laws of media” tetrad model, allowing for analysis of what is enhanced, obsolesced, retrieved, and reversed in this hybrid publishing model, with the aim of showing what each component can effectively bring in order to support the print edition and to integrate the digital components. The results inform the design and framework of a magazine publishing model in which the print issue is the focus, with support from the digital components. Any independent magazine can apply the results to its current practices or use them to launch a new hybrid offering.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Plante, Sylvie;
    Country: Canada

    This synthesis paper introduces a conceptual model which explains how boundary spanning practices use relational, cognitive and structural social capital to facilitate innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Social capital is a multidimensional concept used by scholars from different disciplines to demonstrate the benefits of accessing resources through relationships in social networks. Past research has shown that social capital can accelerate positive innovation outcomes for organizations facing complex challenges, including PPPs that seek to share costs, resources and risks across sectors to develop and sustain competitive advantage. In practice, many PPPs fail to achieve anticipated innovation outcomes, due in part to a breakdown of social relations between partners. The conceptual model is described and illustrated across three components of the dissertation by portfolio: Journal article, online course/learning module and instructional video. Based on results of a qualitative research study that investigated critical incidents on innovation projects in PPPs from the perspectives of public and private sector innovators, the model identifies practices that help leaders across sectors find ways to collaborate more effectively to manage innovation. Three modes of inference were used to analyse interview data, which referenced different industries and types of innovation, producing a holistic understanding of the interaction of social capital and innovation in PPPs. A critical realist, interdisciplinary approach combined theory and empirical data to identify generative mechanisms of innovation outcomes on PPP projects. A knowledge dissemination section describes how the research findings are being made accessible to meet the needs of practitioners as well as academic researchers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Botica, Tony;
    Country: Canada

    This research is focused at the sites of Tumbo Island North and Tumbo Cliff (both on Tumbo Island within the Gulf Islands National Park Reserve [GINPR]), with supplemental data from Rocky Point Department of National Defense (DND) and Garry oak Preserve on Vancouver Island, and Waldron Island in Washington State. Field data is overlaid with a literature review of First Nations’ land management practices and acknowledges First Nations’ use of wildfire on traditional landscapes. Results comparing 2010 to 2018 vegetation data indicate an overall increase in exotic and native species and a net negative effect of fire application. Fuel loading levels are higher than expected and have a direct relationship to fire behaviour outputs. Canopy cover has a positive net effect on native species in grass strata and exotic species in forest strata and a negative net effect if found on exotic species in grass strata and native species in forest strata. An additional product of this research is a restoration plan for Tumbo Island North, which includes a comprehensive burn plan for reintroducing fire to Garry oak (Quercus garryana or p’hwulhp ) ecosystems with an aim to restoration, and with specific prescriptions for reducing conifer encroachment, reducing forest fuel loading, increasing oak sapling regeneration and survival, and increasing plant diversity of native plant species. This restoration plan can serve as a model that can be adapted and used at other Garry oak ecosystem sites. p’hwulhp is the Hul’qumi’num word for Garry oak (Hul’qumi’num Treaty Group, 2011,p.10).

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Quian, Kellie;
    Country: Canada

    This thesis used an action research process to formulate actionable strategies that Clinical Knowledge and Content Management (CKCM) leaders could use to support their nonclinical staff through change. This study explored the following main inquiry question: How can Clinical Knowledge and Content Management staff in Alberta Health Services be effectively supported as they work toward the implementation of new roles and responsibilities? A sequential mixed-methods approach was applied using semistructured interviews, a survey, and a group interview. The three main themes emerged from the data: workplace flexibility, decision-making inclusion, and meetings with management. The project recommendations focus on distinguishing what flexibility means to CKCM staff and creating more opportunity for it in the workplace, adopting a catchball process to incorporate CKCM staff in workplace decisions and creating a structured schedule for staff to meet with management. This study adhered to the Royal Roads University (2019) Research Ethics Policy.