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171 Research products, page 1 of 18

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  • Scholarship@Western
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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marina Soroka;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Canada
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joy Parr; Jessica van Horssen; Jon van der Veen;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    In this essay, the three authors each discuss how the theme of sharing authority has emerged in their joint work on the Megaprojects New Media project. In part 1, Joy Parr recounts the discussions, dealings, acts of reciprocity, and public advocacy that have characterized her diverse and challenging encounters with communities affected by megaprojects. In part 2, Jessica Van Horssen discusses the particular case of Val Morton, a displaced rancher whose discontinued participation in the project rendered his considerable contributions to it, particularly an archive of documents, a challenge to notions of historical authority. In part 3, Jon van der Veen discusses how new media approaches to sharing such documents can take the form of a middle ground between a narrative and a database, productively drawing on the benefits and drawbacks of each to help others to tell stories with those documents. The authors conclude that it is this sharing of time, information, materials, claims, trust, and finally, public statements between different parties that accounts for the challenges inherent in sharing authority. © 2010 Project MUSE®.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 1980
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Window was dedicated on 20 March 1980. Inscription: To the Glory of God & in loving Memory of Archdeacon CLARENCE W. FOREMAN, RECTOR 1935-67. Given by his family. In discussing the window with the church historian at St. John’s in 1983, Wallis notes: “The symbols in the window speak to us of the ministry of Archdeacon Foreman in our midst. The crown at the top represents the risen Christ who still exercises his ministry of shepherding through those faithful to him. The open Bible and the chalice and host speak to us of the ‘tools of shepherding’ so faithfully used by the Archdeacon.” (The Evangel (St. John the Evangelist), March 1983). Foreman was canon of St. Paul’s Cathedral from 1946-1948; in 1948 he became Archdeacon of Middlesex. In 1956 he was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Huron College. Location: Interior tympanum. Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca) Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1002/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    One of three windows that creates the Symbols of Our Faith that were created in memory of Mrs.. E.C. "Frances" James 1882-1960. The windows were dedicated on June 16, 1963. Location: South Choir, Clerestory Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca) Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1007/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barry Ferguson; Robert Wardhaugh;
    Publisher: University of Toronto Press Inc. (UTPress)
    Country: Canada

    This article examines the Rowell-Sirois Royal Commission on DominionProvincial Relations, the comprehensive study of federal government in crisis undertaken between 1937 and 1940. Based on new theoretical insights into the study of federal government, it argues that scholarly interpretations of Rowell-Sirois and mid-twentieth-century Canadian federalism have tended to dismiss their originality and continuing relevance. Here, the authors focus on the way the commissioners, particularly senior commissioner John W. Dafoe, arrived at a fresh concept of federal government for Canada. They show that Dafoe and his colleagues did not aim at or recommend greater constitutional centralization of powers or greater cooperative programming. On the contrary, the commissioners wanted to strengthen the fiscal basis of the provinces, to more clearly distinguish between areas of provincial and federal responsibility, and, in Dafoe’s case, to rebuild the basis of Confederation so that the longstanding subordination of the Prairie provinces would be undone. Abstract: Cet article se penche sur la Commission royale d’enquete sur les relations entre le Dominion et les provinces, aussi connue sous le nom de Commission Rowell-Sirois, etude exhaustive menee par le gouvernement federal en periode de crise entre 1937 et 1940. S’appuyant sur de nouvelles perceptions theoriques concernant l’etude du gouvernement federal, l’article soutient que les interpretations de la Commission Rowell-Sirois et du federalisme canadien du milieu du XXe siecle par les erudits ont tendu, dans l’ensemble, a negliger leur originalite de meme que leur pertinence qui est toujours d’actualite. L’article se concentre sur la facon dont les membres de la Commission, en particulier son commissaire principal, John W. Dafoe, en sont arrives a un concept neuf de gouvernement federal pour le Canada. 11 revele que Dafoe et ses collegues ne visaient ni ne recommandaient une plus grande centralisation constitutionnelle des pouvoirs ou un niveau accru de programmes en collaboration. Bien au contraire, ils voulaient renforcer l’assise fiscale des provinces, mieux demarquer les domaines de competence provinciale de ceux de competence federale et, dans le cas de Dafoe, rebâtir l’assise de la Confederation afin de renverser la subordination traditionnelle des provinces des Prairies.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Trimble, Janet;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    A research report about the history and culture of the Beausoleil Band and Christian Island. In collaboration with the Museum of Indian Archaeology (now Museum of Ontario Archaeology) in a project funded by the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture. This a project of the MA Public History program.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 1969
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Williams, Yvonne; Nuttgens, Michael; Simon, Ellen; Barteet, C. Cody;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Dedicated September 28th, 1969 in memory of Eric Mark Walsh and Katherine May Walsh. Luke 22:14-19. Has correlation to the Jewish Passover celebration. Christ shared bread and wine with disciples. Williams notes that the design and cartoon were by Ellen Simon, while Williams chose the colouring, and Michael Nuttgens painted the glass. Location: South Nave Wall, 1st window (east to west). https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/y_williams_stainedglass_on_toronto_stmikesangels/1046/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    The image shows the torso of the Good Shepherd. Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca). Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1028/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Robert MacDougall;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    In Philadelphia in the 1870s, John Worrell Keely announced the invention of a fantastic new motor that could, he promised, drive locomotives, power factories, and even defy gravity without fuel or heat. The Keely Motor became the most notorious perpetual motion scheme of the nineteenth century, attracting believers and investors for nearly thirty years. This article explores the "work" the motor performed for Keely, his supporters, and his critics-not physical work, but financial, cultural, and psychological. To investors, the Keely Motor represented a dream of riches without effort. To Keely's critics, the motor offered an opportunity to defend the legitimacy of the new industrial economy. And to Keely's staunchest supporters, including the author and heiress Clara Moore, the motor was a rebuke to the laws of thermodynamics and the parsimonious political economy, the pessimistic theology, and the anti-feminist psychiatry those laws were alleged to support.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    The detail (from the right corner of the window) shows many of the small fish and plants of the Earth. The window was dedicated on April 24, 1977. Location: Interior tympanum. Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca). Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1040/thumbnail.jpg

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
171 Research products, page 1 of 18
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marina Soroka;
    Publisher: Informa UK Limited
    Country: Canada
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Joy Parr; Jessica van Horssen; Jon van der Veen;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    In this essay, the three authors each discuss how the theme of sharing authority has emerged in their joint work on the Megaprojects New Media project. In part 1, Joy Parr recounts the discussions, dealings, acts of reciprocity, and public advocacy that have characterized her diverse and challenging encounters with communities affected by megaprojects. In part 2, Jessica Van Horssen discusses the particular case of Val Morton, a displaced rancher whose discontinued participation in the project rendered his considerable contributions to it, particularly an archive of documents, a challenge to notions of historical authority. In part 3, Jon van der Veen discusses how new media approaches to sharing such documents can take the form of a middle ground between a narrative and a database, productively drawing on the benefits and drawbacks of each to help others to tell stories with those documents. The authors conclude that it is this sharing of time, information, materials, claims, trust, and finally, public statements between different parties that accounts for the challenges inherent in sharing authority. © 2010 Project MUSE®.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 1980
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Window was dedicated on 20 March 1980. Inscription: To the Glory of God & in loving Memory of Archdeacon CLARENCE W. FOREMAN, RECTOR 1935-67. Given by his family. In discussing the window with the church historian at St. John’s in 1983, Wallis notes: “The symbols in the window speak to us of the ministry of Archdeacon Foreman in our midst. The crown at the top represents the risen Christ who still exercises his ministry of shepherding through those faithful to him. The open Bible and the chalice and host speak to us of the ‘tools of shepherding’ so faithfully used by the Archdeacon.” (The Evangel (St. John the Evangelist), March 1983). Foreman was canon of St. Paul’s Cathedral from 1946-1948; in 1948 he became Archdeacon of Middlesex. In 1956 he was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity from Huron College. Location: Interior tympanum. Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca) Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1002/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    One of three windows that creates the Symbols of Our Faith that were created in memory of Mrs.. E.C. "Frances" James 1882-1960. The windows were dedicated on June 16, 1963. Location: South Choir, Clerestory Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca) Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1007/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barry Ferguson; Robert Wardhaugh;
    Publisher: University of Toronto Press Inc. (UTPress)
    Country: Canada

    This article examines the Rowell-Sirois Royal Commission on DominionProvincial Relations, the comprehensive study of federal government in crisis undertaken between 1937 and 1940. Based on new theoretical insights into the study of federal government, it argues that scholarly interpretations of Rowell-Sirois and mid-twentieth-century Canadian federalism have tended to dismiss their originality and continuing relevance. Here, the authors focus on the way the commissioners, particularly senior commissioner John W. Dafoe, arrived at a fresh concept of federal government for Canada. They show that Dafoe and his colleagues did not aim at or recommend greater constitutional centralization of powers or greater cooperative programming. On the contrary, the commissioners wanted to strengthen the fiscal basis of the provinces, to more clearly distinguish between areas of provincial and federal responsibility, and, in Dafoe’s case, to rebuild the basis of Confederation so that the longstanding subordination of the Prairie provinces would be undone. Abstract: Cet article se penche sur la Commission royale d’enquete sur les relations entre le Dominion et les provinces, aussi connue sous le nom de Commission Rowell-Sirois, etude exhaustive menee par le gouvernement federal en periode de crise entre 1937 et 1940. S’appuyant sur de nouvelles perceptions theoriques concernant l’etude du gouvernement federal, l’article soutient que les interpretations de la Commission Rowell-Sirois et du federalisme canadien du milieu du XXe siecle par les erudits ont tendu, dans l’ensemble, a negliger leur originalite de meme que leur pertinence qui est toujours d’actualite. L’article se concentre sur la facon dont les membres de la Commission, en particulier son commissaire principal, John W. Dafoe, en sont arrives a un concept neuf de gouvernement federal pour le Canada. 11 revele que Dafoe et ses collegues ne visaient ni ne recommandaient une plus grande centralisation constitutionnelle des pouvoirs ou un niveau accru de programmes en collaboration. Bien au contraire, ils voulaient renforcer l’assise fiscale des provinces, mieux demarquer les domaines de competence provinciale de ceux de competence federale et, dans le cas de Dafoe, rebâtir l’assise de la Confederation afin de renverser la subordination traditionnelle des provinces des Prairies.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Trimble, Janet;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    A research report about the history and culture of the Beausoleil Band and Christian Island. In collaboration with the Museum of Indian Archaeology (now Museum of Ontario Archaeology) in a project funded by the Ministry of Citizenship and Culture. This a project of the MA Public History program.

  • Publication . Other literature type . 1969
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Williams, Yvonne; Nuttgens, Michael; Simon, Ellen; Barteet, C. Cody;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Dedicated September 28th, 1969 in memory of Eric Mark Walsh and Katherine May Walsh. Luke 22:14-19. Has correlation to the Jewish Passover celebration. Christ shared bread and wine with disciples. Williams notes that the design and cartoon were by Ellen Simon, while Williams chose the colouring, and Michael Nuttgens painted the glass. Location: South Nave Wall, 1st window (east to west). https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/y_williams_stainedglass_on_toronto_stmikesangels/1046/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    The image shows the torso of the Good Shepherd. Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca). Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1028/thumbnail.jpg

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Robert MacDougall;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    In Philadelphia in the 1870s, John Worrell Keely announced the invention of a fantastic new motor that could, he promised, drive locomotives, power factories, and even defy gravity without fuel or heat. The Keely Motor became the most notorious perpetual motion scheme of the nineteenth century, attracting believers and investors for nearly thirty years. This article explores the "work" the motor performed for Keely, his supporters, and his critics-not physical work, but financial, cultural, and psychological. To investors, the Keely Motor represented a dream of riches without effort. To Keely's critics, the motor offered an opportunity to defend the legitimacy of the new industrial economy. And to Keely's staunchest supporters, including the author and heiress Clara Moore, the motor was a rebuke to the laws of thermodynamics and the parsimonious political economy, the pessimistic theology, and the anti-feminist psychiatry those laws were alleged to support.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wallis, Christopher;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    The detail (from the right corner of the window) shows many of the small fish and plants of the Earth. The window was dedicated on April 24, 1977. Location: Interior tympanum. Lead Investigator: C. Cody Barteet (cbarteet@uwo.ca). Photograph: Anahi Gonzalez https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/chriswallis_stainedglass_on_london_stjohnevangelist/1040/thumbnail.jpg