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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brett Plouffe; Tamara Van Hooren; Michelle Barton; Michelle Barton; Nancy Nashid; Erkan Demirkaya; Erkan Demirkaya; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; +8 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Canada

    Renal infarction is a rare finding in children. Associations between SARS-CoV-2 infections and thromboembolic events including renal infarcts have been described in adults. Although a similar association in children has not yet been described with this pandemic, the pediatric literature is still evolving with the recognition of new manifestations including the post-infectious Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). We report the rare event of multiple renal infarcts in a 6-year-old boy manifesting several features of MIS-C 9 weeks following a self-limiting febrile illness characteristic of COVID-19. An underlying Factor V Leiden mutation was identified in this child but felt to be insufficient on its own to explain his clinical presentation. As SARS-CoV-2 testing was delayed, the failure to identify viral RNA or antibodies may not exclude the virus' potential role in precipitating the infarct in this host. Given that renal infarcts have been described in adult patients with COVID-19, reporting this perplexing case where SARS-CoV-2 may have played a role, may help identify this potential complication.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Angela M. Caliendo; David N. Gilbert; Christine C. Ginocchio; Kimberly E. Hanson; Larissa S May; Thomas C. Quinn; Fred C. Tenover; David Alland; Anne J. Blaschke; Robert A. Bonomo; +8 more
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

    In this IDSA policy paper, we review the current diagnostic landscape, including unmet needs and emerging technologies, and assess the challenges to the development and clinical integration of improved tests. To fulfill the promise of emerging diagnostics, IDSA presents recommendations that address a host of identified barriers. Achieving these goals will require the engagement and coordination of a number of stakeholders, including Congress, funding and regulatory bodies, public health agencies, the diagnostics industry, healthcare systems, professional societies, and individual clinicians.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rachel P. Rosovsky; Kristen M. Sanfilippo; Tzu-Fei Wang; Sandeep K. Rajan; Surbhi Shah; Karlyn Martin; Fionnuala Ní Áinle; Menno V. Huisman; Beverley J. Hunt; Susan R. Kahn; +4 more
    Country: Netherlands

    Abstract Background Best practice for prevention, diagnosis, and management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) is unknown due to limited published data in this population. Objectives We aimed to assess current global practice and experience in management of COVID‐19–associated coagulopathy to identify information to guide prospective and randomized studies. Methods Physicians were queried about their current approach to prophylaxis, diagnosis, and treatment of VTE in patients with COVID‐19 using an online survey tool distributed through multiple international organizations between April 10 and 14, 2020. Results Five hundred fifteen physicians from 41 countries responded. The majority of respondents (78%) recommended prophylactic anticoagulation for all hospitalized patients with COVID‐19, with most recommending use of low‐molecular‐weight heparin or unfractionated heparin. Significant practice variation was found regarding the need for dose escalation of anticoagulation outside the setting of confirmed or suspected VTE. Respondents reported the use of bedside testing when unable to perform standard diagnostic imaging for diagnosis of VTE. Two hundred ninety‐one respondents reported observing thrombotic complications in their patients, with 64% noting that the complication was pulmonary embolism. Of the 44% of respondents who estimated incidence of thrombosis in patients with COVID‐19 in their hospital, estimates ranged widely from 1% to 50%. One hundred seventy‐four respondents noted bleeding complications (34% minor bleeding, 14% clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding, and 12% major bleeding). Conclusion Well‐designed epidemiologic studies are urgently needed to understand the incidence and risk factors of VTE and bleeding complications in patients with COVID‐19. Randomized clinical trials addressing use of anticoagulation are also needed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evelien Dekker; Han-Mo Chiu; Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar; Luis E. Caro; Jason A. Dominitz; Stephen P Halloran; Cesare Hassan; Julia Ismael; Rodrigo Jover; Michal F. Kaminski; +13 more
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Justin Ashley; Graham Abra; Brigitte Schiller; Paul Bennett; Ali Poyan Mehr; Joanne M. Bargman; Christopher T. Chan;
    Publisher: Australia : Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
    Country: Australia

    Home dialysis therapies are flexible kidney replacement strategies with documented clinical benefits. While the incidence of end-stage kidney disease continues to increase globally, the use of home dialysis remains low in most developed countries. Multiple barriers to providing home dialysis have been noted in the published literature. Among known challenges, gaps in clinician knowledge are potentially addressable with a focused education strategy. Recent national surveys in the United States and Australia have highlighted the need for enhanced home dialysis knowledge especially among nephrologists who have recently completed training. Traditional in-person continuing professional educational programmes have had modest success in promoting home dialysis and are limited by scale and the present global COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesize that the use of a ‘Hub and Spoke’ model of virtual home dialysis mentorship for nephrologists based on project ECHO would support home dialysis growth. We review the home dialysis literature, known educational gaps and plausible educational interventions to address current limitations in physician education Refereed/Peer-reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Roy Duncan; Carla L. Mason; Éva Nagy; Jo-Ann Leong; Peter Dobos;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    The genome segment B sequence of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus was determined for both the Jasper and Sp serotypes. The sequences are 2784 and 2630 by long, respectively, and contain a single large open reading frame encoding the VP1 protein, the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of IPNV. The proteins exhibit an 88% homology with each other, but only 41% with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) VP1, another member of the Birnaviridae. Despite the low overall homology between the IPNV and IBDV VP1 proteins, homologous regions were detected within the central portion of the proteins. The carboxy-proximal regions of the VP1, which contain very low amino acid homology, displayed evidence of conservation in structural features such as a hydrophilic, highly basic domain. Consensus sequences associated with GTP-binding proteins and RdRps were also detected in VP1. However, unlike the RdRps associated with single-stranded plus RNA viruses, the birnavirus RdRp lacks the Gly-Asp-Asp motif characteristic of this enzyme family.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tayyab Rashid; Robert E. McGrath;
    Publisher: International Journal of Wellbeing

    COVID-19 is truly an unprecedented event, forcing nearly four billion people into isolation, social distancing, and requiring people to rigorously follow public health measures such as frequent hand washing and indoor face-covering. People around the world have spent months staying home-bound, enduring significant financial, social, and emotional costs. They have been feeling anxious, irritable, afraid, and ambivalent in the wake of an invisible, pervasive, and potent pandemic. A strength focus can help us mitigate unwarranted or excessive negative emotions engendered by maintaining social distancing. This paper posits that by using our strengths, we can enhance our psychological immunity through pragmatic actions to enhance our daily wellbeing. More importantly, we can reframe and reappraise challenges to build perspective in dealing with global crises such as pandemics and disasters. Strengths expressed through pragmatic actions can boost our coping skills as well as enhance our wellbeing. Consistent with the zeitgeist of our times-equity, social justice, digital connections, the paper offers easily implemented, concrete actions using character strengths in adaptive ways to reduce the likelihood that social distancing will result in overwhelming anxiety, lack of structure or stimulation, and demoralization.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alex F. Herrera; Jasmine Zain; Kerry J. Savage; Tatyana Feldman; Jonathan E. Brammer; Lu Chen; Leslie Popplewell; Lihua E. Budde; Matthew Mei; Lori A. Leslie; +7 more
    Publisher: American Society of Hematology

    Abstract Introduction: Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are a heterogeneous group of lymphomas associated with poor outcomes following anthracycline-based chemotherapy, even when consolidative autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is used. CD30 expression is universal in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and is frequently expressed in other PTCL subtypes. Brentuximab vedotin (BV) is a CD30-directed antibody drug conjugate that prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) when combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone (CHP) as compared to CHOP chemotherapy (Horwitz, 2020). Although a majority of pts treated with BV-CHP remained in durable remission (5y PFS 51%), there is room for improvement. Based on retrospective studies that demonstrated improved outcomes in younger pts, the addition of etoposide to CHOP (CHOEP) is commonly used as initial therapy for PTCL. We performed a multicenter phase 2 trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding etoposide to BV-CHP (CHEP-BV) followed by BV consolidation in pts with newly diagnosed CD30-expressing PTCL. Methods: Adults with newly diagnosed CD30+ (≥ 1% of tumor cells by local pathology) PTCL were eligible, including pts with ALK+ ALCL and IPI score ≥ 2, ALK-negative ALCL, PTCL not otherwise specified (NOS), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), among others. After accrual of 28 pts, the protocol was amended to allow enrollment of 20 additional pts with CD30+ non-ALCL PTCL (with ALCL allowed in Canada). Pts could receive prephase steroids and/or 1 cycle of CHOP-equivalent chemotherapy prior to study entry. 6 pts were treated in a safety lead-in cohort and all pts received CHEP-BV at the recommended phase 2 dose: 6 x 21-day cycles of CHP+BV (1.8mg/kg) on d1 and etoposide 100mg/m2 on d1-3. G-CSF prophylaxis was mandatory. Pts in response after CHEP-BV could receive BV consolidation (1.8mg/kg q3w) for up to 10 additional cycles (16 total BV cycles) either after ASCT or CHEP-BV if no ASCT was performed. The co-primary endpoints were safety and the CR rate (Deauville score 1-3) by PET-CT after CHEP-BV assessed by investigators according to the 2014 Lugano classification. Secondary endpoints were PFS and OS. Results: Accrual has completed and 48 pts were enrolled; all were evaluable for toxicity, 46 were evaluable for efficacy. 16 pts had ALCL (13 ALK+, 3 ALK-) and 32 had non-ALCL PTCL subtypes, including 18 with AITL, 11 with PTCL NOS, 2 with T-follicular helper PTCL, and 1 with ATLL. Baseline characteristics are shown in Table. 43 pts completed CHEP-BV, 2 had progressive disease (PD) prior to completion, 1 pt discontinued CHEP-BV early (MD discretion), 1 pt died due to COVID-19, and 1 remains on CHEP-BV. Of 43 pts who completed CHEP-BV, 24 proceeded to ASCT and 19 did not. 33 (74%) pts received BV consolidation (20 after ASCT, 13 directly after CHEP-BV) and completed a median 8 of the planned 10 cycles (range, 1-10). 13 pts completed all cycles of consolidation; 19 pts discontinued early - 12 due to adverse events (AE), 5 due to PD, and 2 due to patient/physician choice. The most frequent CHEP-BV related AEs (all grades, G) include fatigue (73%), peripheral sensory neuropathy (67%), anemia (62.5%), nausea (56%), neutropenia (50%), lymphopenia (44%), leukopenia (42%), thrombocytopenia (40%), elevated transaminases (33%). The most common G3+ AEs were neutropenia (37.5%), febrile neutropenia (23%), lymphopenia (21%), anemia (19%), thrombocytopenia (19%). There were 5 deaths, 4 due to PD and 1 due to COVID-19 infection during C3 of CHEP-BV. The interim (n=46) ORR and CR rates (after 3 CHEP-BV cycles, except 1 pt after 2) were 96% and 59% (27 CR, 17 PR), respectively. At completion of CHEP-BV (n=46), the ORR was 91% with 80% CR (37 CR, 5 PR, 4 PD). The ORR/CR rates in ALCL (n=16) vs non-ALCL (n=30) pts were 94%/94% vs 90%/73%, respectively. The ORR/CR rates in pts with CD30 expression 1-9% (n=15) vs 10+% (n=31) were 93%/67% and 90%/87%, respectively. The median follow-up in surviving pts is 16.1 months (range, 0.9-32.5). The overall 18mo PFS and OS were 61% and 89%; 18mo PFS by subgroup: ALCL 81%, non-ALCL 49%, CD30 1-9% 48%, CD30 10+% 67%. Landmark 1y PFS from end of CHEP-BV in responding pts (n=41) was 82% in pts who underwent ASCT vs 48% in pts who did not. Conclusions: In a cohort of pts with mostly non-ALCL CD30-expressing PTCL, CHEP-BV (+/- ASCT) followed by BV consolidation was tolerable and effective. Figure 1 Figure 1. Disclosures Herrera: Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding; Seagen: Consultancy, Research Funding; Kite, a Gilead Company: Research Funding; Gilead Sciences: Research Funding; Tubulis: Consultancy; Karyopharm: Consultancy; Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Research Funding; ADC Therapeutics: Consultancy, Research Funding; AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Research Funding; Takeda: Consultancy; Merck: Consultancy, Research Funding. Zain: Secura Bio, DaichiSankyo, Abbvie: Research Funding; Kiyoaw Kirin, Secura Bio, Seattle Genetics: Honoraria; Secura Bio, Ono , Legend, Kiyowa Kirin, Myeloid Therapeutics Verastem Daichi Sankyo: Consultancy. Savage: Astra-Zeneca: Consultancy, Honoraria; Seattle Genetics: Consultancy, Honoraria; Takeda: Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; Roche: Research Funding; Servier: Consultancy, Honoraria; Merck: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria; BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; Beigene: Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; Genentech: Research Funding. Feldman: Alexion, AstraZeneca Rare Disease: Honoraria, Other: Study investigator. Brammer: Celgene: Research Funding; Kymera Therapeutics: Consultancy; Seattle Genetics: Speakers Bureau. Popplewell: Hoffman La Roche: Other: Food; Novartis: Other: Travel; Pfizer: Other: Travel. Budde: Kite Pharma: Consultancy; Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding; AstraZeneca: Research Funding. Mei: Morphosys: Research Funding; Janssen: Honoraria; TG Therapeutics: Research Funding; EUSA: Honoraria; BMS: Research Funding; Epizyme: Research Funding; Beigene: Research Funding. Leslie: Merck: Consultancy; Pharmacyclics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Abbvie: Consultancy, Honoraria; PCYC/Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Kite, a Gilead Company: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Celgene/BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Karyopharm Therapeutics: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Epizyme: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Seagen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; BeiGene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; TG Therapeutics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Janssen: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; ADC Therapeutics: Consultancy. Hosing: Nkarta Therapeutics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Forman: Mustang Bio: Consultancy, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company; Lixte Biotechnology: Consultancy, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company; Allogene: Consultancy. Kwak: Pepromene Bio, Inc.: Consultancy, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jonathon L Maguire; Catherine S Birken; Mark Loeb; Muhammad Mamdani; Kevin E. Thorpe; Jeffrey S Hoch; Tony Mazzulli; Cornelia M. Borkhoff; Colin Macarthur; Patricia C. Parkin;
    Publisher: BioMed Central
    Country: United States
    Project: CIHR

    Background Vitamin D levels are alarmingly low (<75 nmol/L) in 65-70% of North American children older than 1 year. An increased risk of viral upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), asthma-related hospitalizations and use of anti-inflammatory medication have all been linked with low vitamin D. No study has determined whether wintertime vitamin D supplementation can reduce the risk of URTI and asthma exacerbations, two of the most common and costly illnesses of early childhood. The objectives of this study are: 1) to compare the effect of ‘high dose’ (2000 IU/day) vs. ‘standard dose’ (400 IU/day) vitamin D supplementation in achieving reductions in laboratory confirmed URTI and asthma exacerbations during the winter in preschool-aged Canadian children; and 2) to assess the effect of ‘high dose’ vitamin D supplementation on vitamin D serum levels and specific viruses that cause URTI. Methods/Design This study is a pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Over 4 successive winters we will recruit 750 healthy children 1–5 years of age. Participating physicians are part of a primary healthcare research network called TARGet Kids!. Children will be randomized to the ‘standard dose’ or ‘high dose’ oral supplemental vitamin D for a minimum of 4 months (200 children per group). Parents will obtain a nasal swab from their child with each URTI, report the number of asthma exacerbations and complete symptom checklists. Unscheduled physician visits for URTIs and asthma exacerbations will be recorded. By May, a blood sample will be drawn to determine vitamin D serum levels. The primary analysis will be a comparison of URTI rate between study groups using a Poisson regression model. Secondary analyses will compare vitamin D serum levels, asthma exacerbations and the frequency of specific viral agents between groups. Discussion Identifying whether vitamin D supplementation of preschoolers can reduce wintertime viral URTIs and asthma exacerbations and what dose is optimal may reduce population wide morbidity and associated health care and societal costs. This information will assist in determining practice and health policy recommendations related to vitamin D supplementation in healthy Canadian preschoolers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Qi Zhang; Miao Gui; Xuefeng Niu; Shihua He; Ruoke Wang; Yupeng Feng; Andrea Kroeker; Yanan Zuo; Hua Wang; Ying Wang; +9 more
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection.

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The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
4,411 Research products, page 1 of 442
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Brett Plouffe; Tamara Van Hooren; Michelle Barton; Michelle Barton; Nancy Nashid; Erkan Demirkaya; Erkan Demirkaya; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; Kambiz Norozi; +8 more
    Publisher: Frontiers Media S.A.
    Country: Canada

    Renal infarction is a rare finding in children. Associations between SARS-CoV-2 infections and thromboembolic events including renal infarcts have been described in adults. Although a similar association in children has not yet been described with this pandemic, the pediatric literature is still evolving with the recognition of new manifestations including the post-infectious Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C). We report the rare event of multiple renal infarcts in a 6-year-old boy manifesting several features of MIS-C 9 weeks following a self-limiting febrile illness characteristic of COVID-19. An underlying Factor V Leiden mutation was identified in this child but felt to be insufficient on its own to explain his clinical presentation. As SARS-CoV-2 testing was delayed, the failure to identify viral RNA or antibodies may not exclude the virus' potential role in precipitating the infarct in this host. Given that renal infarcts have been described in adult patients with COVID-19, reporting this perplexing case where SARS-CoV-2 may have played a role, may help identify this potential complication.

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Angela M. Caliendo; David N. Gilbert; Christine C. Ginocchio; Kimberly E. Hanson; Larissa S May; Thomas C. Quinn; Fred C. Tenover; David Alland; Anne J. Blaschke; Robert A. Bonomo; +8 more
    Publisher: Oxford University Press (OUP)

    In this IDSA policy paper, we review the current diagnostic landscape, including unmet needs and emerging technologies, and assess the challenges to the development and clinical integration of improved tests. To fulfill the promise of emerging diagnostics, IDSA presents recommendations that address a host of identified barriers. Achieving these goals will require the engagement and coordination of a number of stakeholders, including Congress, funding and regulatory bodies, public health agencies, the diagnostics industry, healthcare systems, professional societies, and individual clinicians.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rachel P. Rosovsky; Kristen M. Sanfilippo; Tzu-Fei Wang; Sandeep K. Rajan; Surbhi Shah; Karlyn Martin; Fionnuala Ní Áinle; Menno V. Huisman; Beverley J. Hunt; Susan R. Kahn; +4 more
    Country: Netherlands

    Abstract Background Best practice for prevention, diagnosis, and management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) is unknown due to limited published data in this population. Objectives We aimed to assess current global practice and experience in management of COVID‐19–associated coagulopathy to identify information to guide prospective and randomized studies. Methods Physicians were queried about their current approach to prophylaxis, diagnosis, and treatment of VTE in patients with COVID‐19 using an online survey tool distributed through multiple international organizations between April 10 and 14, 2020. Results Five hundred fifteen physicians from 41 countries responded. The majority of respondents (78%) recommended prophylactic anticoagulation for all hospitalized patients with COVID‐19, with most recommending use of low‐molecular‐weight heparin or unfractionated heparin. Significant practice variation was found regarding the need for dose escalation of anticoagulation outside the setting of confirmed or suspected VTE. Respondents reported the use of bedside testing when unable to perform standard diagnostic imaging for diagnosis of VTE. Two hundred ninety‐one respondents reported observing thrombotic complications in their patients, with 64% noting that the complication was pulmonary embolism. Of the 44% of respondents who estimated incidence of thrombosis in patients with COVID‐19 in their hospital, estimates ranged widely from 1% to 50%. One hundred seventy‐four respondents noted bleeding complications (34% minor bleeding, 14% clinically relevant nonmajor bleeding, and 12% major bleeding). Conclusion Well‐designed epidemiologic studies are urgently needed to understand the incidence and risk factors of VTE and bleeding complications in patients with COVID‐19. Randomized clinical trials addressing use of anticoagulation are also needed.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Evelien Dekker; Han-Mo Chiu; Iris Lansdorp-Vogelaar; Luis E. Caro; Jason A. Dominitz; Stephen P Halloran; Cesare Hassan; Julia Ismael; Rodrigo Jover; Michal F. Kaminski; +13 more
    Country: Netherlands
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Justin Ashley; Graham Abra; Brigitte Schiller; Paul Bennett; Ali Poyan Mehr; Joanne M. Bargman; Christopher T. Chan;
    Publisher: Australia : Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
    Country: Australia

    Home dialysis therapies are flexible kidney replacement strategies with documented clinical benefits. While the incidence of end-stage kidney disease continues to increase globally, the use of home dialysis remains low in most developed countries. Multiple barriers to providing home dialysis have been noted in the published literature. Among known challenges, gaps in clinician knowledge are potentially addressable with a focused education strategy. Recent national surveys in the United States and Australia have highlighted the need for enhanced home dialysis knowledge especially among nephrologists who have recently completed training. Traditional in-person continuing professional educational programmes have had modest success in promoting home dialysis and are limited by scale and the present global COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesize that the use of a ‘Hub and Spoke’ model of virtual home dialysis mentorship for nephrologists based on project ECHO would support home dialysis growth. We review the home dialysis literature, known educational gaps and plausible educational interventions to address current limitations in physician education Refereed/Peer-reviewed

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Roy Duncan; Carla L. Mason; Éva Nagy; Jo-Ann Leong; Peter Dobos;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    The genome segment B sequence of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus was determined for both the Jasper and Sp serotypes. The sequences are 2784 and 2630 by long, respectively, and contain a single large open reading frame encoding the VP1 protein, the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of IPNV. The proteins exhibit an 88% homology with each other, but only 41% with infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) VP1, another member of the Birnaviridae. Despite the low overall homology between the IPNV and IBDV VP1 proteins, homologous regions were detected within the central portion of the proteins. The carboxy-proximal regions of the VP1, which contain very low amino acid homology, displayed evidence of conservation in structural features such as a hydrophilic, highly basic domain. Consensus sequences associated with GTP-binding proteins and RdRps were also detected in VP1. However, unlike the RdRps associated with single-stranded plus RNA viruses, the birnavirus RdRp lacks the Gly-Asp-Asp motif characteristic of this enzyme family.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Tayyab Rashid; Robert E. McGrath;
    Publisher: International Journal of Wellbeing

    COVID-19 is truly an unprecedented event, forcing nearly four billion people into isolation, social distancing, and requiring people to rigorously follow public health measures such as frequent hand washing and indoor face-covering. People around the world have spent months staying home-bound, enduring significant financial, social, and emotional costs. They have been feeling anxious, irritable, afraid, and ambivalent in the wake of an invisible, pervasive, and potent pandemic. A strength focus can help us mitigate unwarranted or excessive negative emotions engendered by maintaining social distancing. This paper posits that by using our strengths, we can enhance our psychological immunity through pragmatic actions to enhance our daily wellbeing. More importantly, we can reframe and reappraise challenges to build perspective in dealing with global crises such as pandemics and disasters. Strengths expressed through pragmatic actions can boost our coping skills as well as enhance our wellbeing. Consistent with the zeitgeist of our times-equity, social justice, digital connections, the paper offers easily implemented, concrete actions using character strengths in adaptive ways to reduce the likelihood that social distancing will result in overwhelming anxiety, lack of structure or stimulation, and demoralization.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Alex F. Herrera; Jasmine Zain; Kerry J. Savage; Tatyana Feldman; Jonathan E. Brammer; Lu Chen; Leslie Popplewell; Lihua E. Budde; Matthew Mei; Lori A. Leslie; +7 more
    Publisher: American Society of Hematology

    Abstract Introduction: Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCL) are a heterogeneous group of lymphomas associated with poor outcomes following anthracycline-based chemotherapy, even when consolidative autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is used. CD30 expression is universal in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and is frequently expressed in other PTCL subtypes. Brentuximab vedotin (BV) is a CD30-directed antibody drug conjugate that prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) when combined with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone (CHP) as compared to CHOP chemotherapy (Horwitz, 2020). Although a majority of pts treated with BV-CHP remained in durable remission (5y PFS 51%), there is room for improvement. Based on retrospective studies that demonstrated improved outcomes in younger pts, the addition of etoposide to CHOP (CHOEP) is commonly used as initial therapy for PTCL. We performed a multicenter phase 2 trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of adding etoposide to BV-CHP (CHEP-BV) followed by BV consolidation in pts with newly diagnosed CD30-expressing PTCL. Methods: Adults with newly diagnosed CD30+ (≥ 1% of tumor cells by local pathology) PTCL were eligible, including pts with ALK+ ALCL and IPI score ≥ 2, ALK-negative ALCL, PTCL not otherwise specified (NOS), angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL), adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), among others. After accrual of 28 pts, the protocol was amended to allow enrollment of 20 additional pts with CD30+ non-ALCL PTCL (with ALCL allowed in Canada). Pts could receive prephase steroids and/or 1 cycle of CHOP-equivalent chemotherapy prior to study entry. 6 pts were treated in a safety lead-in cohort and all pts received CHEP-BV at the recommended phase 2 dose: 6 x 21-day cycles of CHP+BV (1.8mg/kg) on d1 and etoposide 100mg/m2 on d1-3. G-CSF prophylaxis was mandatory. Pts in response after CHEP-BV could receive BV consolidation (1.8mg/kg q3w) for up to 10 additional cycles (16 total BV cycles) either after ASCT or CHEP-BV if no ASCT was performed. The co-primary endpoints were safety and the CR rate (Deauville score 1-3) by PET-CT after CHEP-BV assessed by investigators according to the 2014 Lugano classification. Secondary endpoints were PFS and OS. Results: Accrual has completed and 48 pts were enrolled; all were evaluable for toxicity, 46 were evaluable for efficacy. 16 pts had ALCL (13 ALK+, 3 ALK-) and 32 had non-ALCL PTCL subtypes, including 18 with AITL, 11 with PTCL NOS, 2 with T-follicular helper PTCL, and 1 with ATLL. Baseline characteristics are shown in Table. 43 pts completed CHEP-BV, 2 had progressive disease (PD) prior to completion, 1 pt discontinued CHEP-BV early (MD discretion), 1 pt died due to COVID-19, and 1 remains on CHEP-BV. Of 43 pts who completed CHEP-BV, 24 proceeded to ASCT and 19 did not. 33 (74%) pts received BV consolidation (20 after ASCT, 13 directly after CHEP-BV) and completed a median 8 of the planned 10 cycles (range, 1-10). 13 pts completed all cycles of consolidation; 19 pts discontinued early - 12 due to adverse events (AE), 5 due to PD, and 2 due to patient/physician choice. The most frequent CHEP-BV related AEs (all grades, G) include fatigue (73%), peripheral sensory neuropathy (67%), anemia (62.5%), nausea (56%), neutropenia (50%), lymphopenia (44%), leukopenia (42%), thrombocytopenia (40%), elevated transaminases (33%). The most common G3+ AEs were neutropenia (37.5%), febrile neutropenia (23%), lymphopenia (21%), anemia (19%), thrombocytopenia (19%). There were 5 deaths, 4 due to PD and 1 due to COVID-19 infection during C3 of CHEP-BV. The interim (n=46) ORR and CR rates (after 3 CHEP-BV cycles, except 1 pt after 2) were 96% and 59% (27 CR, 17 PR), respectively. At completion of CHEP-BV (n=46), the ORR was 91% with 80% CR (37 CR, 5 PR, 4 PD). The ORR/CR rates in ALCL (n=16) vs non-ALCL (n=30) pts were 94%/94% vs 90%/73%, respectively. The ORR/CR rates in pts with CD30 expression 1-9% (n=15) vs 10+% (n=31) were 93%/67% and 90%/87%, respectively. The median follow-up in surviving pts is 16.1 months (range, 0.9-32.5). The overall 18mo PFS and OS were 61% and 89%; 18mo PFS by subgroup: ALCL 81%, non-ALCL 49%, CD30 1-9% 48%, CD30 10+% 67%. Landmark 1y PFS from end of CHEP-BV in responding pts (n=41) was 82% in pts who underwent ASCT vs 48% in pts who did not. Conclusions: In a cohort of pts with mostly non-ALCL CD30-expressing PTCL, CHEP-BV (+/- ASCT) followed by BV consolidation was tolerable and effective. Figure 1 Figure 1. Disclosures Herrera: Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding; Seagen: Consultancy, Research Funding; Kite, a Gilead Company: Research Funding; Gilead Sciences: Research Funding; Tubulis: Consultancy; Karyopharm: Consultancy; Bristol Myers Squibb: Consultancy, Research Funding; ADC Therapeutics: Consultancy, Research Funding; AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Research Funding; Takeda: Consultancy; Merck: Consultancy, Research Funding. Zain: Secura Bio, DaichiSankyo, Abbvie: Research Funding; Kiyoaw Kirin, Secura Bio, Seattle Genetics: Honoraria; Secura Bio, Ono , Legend, Kiyowa Kirin, Myeloid Therapeutics Verastem Daichi Sankyo: Consultancy. Savage: Astra-Zeneca: Consultancy, Honoraria; Seattle Genetics: Consultancy, Honoraria; Takeda: Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; Roche: Research Funding; Servier: Consultancy, Honoraria; Merck: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; AbbVie: Consultancy, Honoraria; BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; Beigene: Other: Institutional clinical trial funding; Genentech: Research Funding. Feldman: Alexion, AstraZeneca Rare Disease: Honoraria, Other: Study investigator. Brammer: Celgene: Research Funding; Kymera Therapeutics: Consultancy; Seattle Genetics: Speakers Bureau. Popplewell: Hoffman La Roche: Other: Food; Novartis: Other: Travel; Pfizer: Other: Travel. Budde: Kite Pharma: Consultancy; Genentech: Consultancy, Research Funding; AstraZeneca: Research Funding. Mei: Morphosys: Research Funding; Janssen: Honoraria; TG Therapeutics: Research Funding; EUSA: Honoraria; BMS: Research Funding; Epizyme: Research Funding; Beigene: Research Funding. Leslie: Merck: Consultancy; Pharmacyclics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Abbvie: Consultancy, Honoraria; PCYC/Janssen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Kite, a Gilead Company: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Celgene/BMS: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; AstraZeneca: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Karyopharm Therapeutics: Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Epizyme: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Seagen: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; BeiGene: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; TG Therapeutics: Consultancy, Honoraria, Speakers Bureau; Janssen: Consultancy, Speakers Bureau; ADC Therapeutics: Consultancy. Hosing: Nkarta Therapeutics: Membership on an entity's Board of Directors or advisory committees. Forman: Mustang Bio: Consultancy, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company; Lixte Biotechnology: Consultancy, Current holder of individual stocks in a privately-held company; Allogene: Consultancy. Kwak: Pepromene Bio, Inc.: Consultancy, Current equity holder in publicly-traded company.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jonathon L Maguire; Catherine S Birken; Mark Loeb; Muhammad Mamdani; Kevin E. Thorpe; Jeffrey S Hoch; Tony Mazzulli; Cornelia M. Borkhoff; Colin Macarthur; Patricia C. Parkin;
    Publisher: BioMed Central
    Country: United States
    Project: CIHR

    Background Vitamin D levels are alarmingly low (<75 nmol/L) in 65-70% of North American children older than 1 year. An increased risk of viral upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), asthma-related hospitalizations and use of anti-inflammatory medication have all been linked with low vitamin D. No study has determined whether wintertime vitamin D supplementation can reduce the risk of URTI and asthma exacerbations, two of the most common and costly illnesses of early childhood. The objectives of this study are: 1) to compare the effect of ‘high dose’ (2000 IU/day) vs. ‘standard dose’ (400 IU/day) vitamin D supplementation in achieving reductions in laboratory confirmed URTI and asthma exacerbations during the winter in preschool-aged Canadian children; and 2) to assess the effect of ‘high dose’ vitamin D supplementation on vitamin D serum levels and specific viruses that cause URTI. Methods/Design This study is a pragmatic randomized controlled trial. Over 4 successive winters we will recruit 750 healthy children 1–5 years of age. Participating physicians are part of a primary healthcare research network called TARGet Kids!. Children will be randomized to the ‘standard dose’ or ‘high dose’ oral supplemental vitamin D for a minimum of 4 months (200 children per group). Parents will obtain a nasal swab from their child with each URTI, report the number of asthma exacerbations and complete symptom checklists. Unscheduled physician visits for URTIs and asthma exacerbations will be recorded. By May, a blood sample will be drawn to determine vitamin D serum levels. The primary analysis will be a comparison of URTI rate between study groups using a Poisson regression model. Secondary analyses will compare vitamin D serum levels, asthma exacerbations and the frequency of specific viral agents between groups. Discussion Identifying whether vitamin D supplementation of preschoolers can reduce wintertime viral URTIs and asthma exacerbations and what dose is optimal may reduce population wide morbidity and associated health care and societal costs. This information will assist in determining practice and health policy recommendations related to vitamin D supplementation in healthy Canadian preschoolers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Qi Zhang; Miao Gui; Xuefeng Niu; Shihua He; Ruoke Wang; Yupeng Feng; Andrea Kroeker; Yanan Zuo; Hua Wang; Ying Wang; +9 more
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection.