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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudio Maffeis; Niels H Birkebaek; Maia Konstantinova; Anke Schwandt; Andriani Vazeou; Kristina Casteels; Sujata M Jali; Catarina Limbert; Auste Pundziute-Lycka; Péter Tóth-Heyn; +13 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Portugal

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of underweight (UW), overweight (OW), and obesity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D).METHODS: An international cross-sectional study including 23 026 T1D children (2-18 years, duration of diabetes ≥1 year) participating in the SWEET prospective, multicenter diabetes registry. Body mass index SD score (BMI-SDS) was calculated using the World Health Organization BMI charts. Children were categorized as UW (BMI-SDS < -2SD), OW (+1SD < BMI-SDS ≤ +2SD), and obese (OB) (BMI-SDS > +2SD). Hierarchic regression models were applied with adjustment for sex, age, and duration of diabetes.RESULTS: The prevalence of UW, OW, and obesity was: 1.4%, 22.3%, and 7.3% in males and 0.6%, 27.2%, and 6.8% in females. Adjusted BMI-SDS was significantly higher in females than in males (mean ± SEM: 0.54 ± 0.05 vs 0.40 ± 0.05, P < 0.0001). In males, BMI-SDS significantly decreased by age (P < 0.0001) in the first three age categories 0.61 ± 0.06 (2 to <10 years), 0.47 ± 0.06 (10 to <13 years), 0.34 ± 0.05 (13 to <16 years). In females, BMI-SDS showed a U-shaped distribution by age (P < 0.0001): 0.54 ± 0.04 (2 to <10 years), 0.39 ± 0.04 (10 to <13 years), 0.55 ± 0.04 (13 to <16 years). BMI-SDS increased by diabetes duration (<2 years: 0.38 ± 0.05, 2 to <5 years: 0.44 ± 0.05, and ≥5 years: 0.50 ± 0.05, P < 0.0001). Treatment modality did not affect BMI-SDS. Adjusted HbA1c was significantly higher in females than in males (8.20% ± 0.10% vs 8.06% ± 0.10%, P < 0.0001). In both genders, the association between HbA1c and BMI-SDS was U-shaped with the highest HbA1c in the UW and obesity groups.CONCLUSIONS: The high rate of OW and obesity (31.8%) emphasize the need for developing further strategies to prevent and treat excess fat accumulation in T1D.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Other literature type . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sarah E. Medland; Jaime Derringer; Jian Yang; Tõnu Esko; Nicolas W. Martin; Konstantin Shakhbazov; Abdel Abdellaoui; Arpana Agrawal; Eva Albrecht; Behrooz Z. Alizadeh; +173 more
    Countries: Netherlands, United States, United Kingdom, Croatia, Australia
    Project: WT , NIH | FINANCIAL STATUS--RETIREM... (2P01AG005842-04), NIH | ECONOMICS OF AGING TRAINI... (5T32AG000186-10), EC | DEVHEALTH (269874), NSF | EAGER Proposal: Workshop ... (1064089), EC | GMI (230374), NIH | NBER Center for Aging and... (5P30AG012810-15)

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of educational attainment was conducted in a discovery sample of 101,069 individuals and a replication sample of 25,490. Three independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are genome-wide significant (rs9320913, rs11584700, rs4851266), and all three replicate. Estimated effects sizes are small (coefficient of determination R2 ≈ 0.02%), approximately 1 month of schooling per allele. A linear polygenic score from all measured SNPs accounts for ≈2% of the variance in both educational attainment and cognitive function. Genes in the region of the loci have previously been associated with health, cognitive, and central nervous system phenotypes, and bioinformatics analyses suggest the involvement of the anterior caudate nucleus. These findings provide promising candidate SNPs for follow-up work, and our effect size estimates can anchor power analyses in social-science genetics. Economics

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dongsu Ryu; Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Rudolf A. Treumann; Christos G. Tsagas; Lawrence M. Widrow;
    Project: EC | ESO-FEL-ALMA08 (229517), NSERC

    Magnetic fields appear to be ubiquitous in astrophysical environments. Their existence in the intracluster medium is established through observations of synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation. On the other hand, the nature of magnetic fields outside of clusters, where observations are scarce and controversial, remains largely unknown. In this chapter, we review recent developments in our understanding of the nature and origin of intergalactic magnetic fields, and in particular, intercluster fields. A plausible scenario for the origin of galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields is for seed fields, created in the early universe, to be amplified by turbulent flows induced during the formation of the large scale structure. We present several mechanisms for the generation of seed fields both before and after recombination. We then discuss the evolution and role of magnetic fields during the formation of the first starts. We describe the turbulent amplification of seed fields during the formation of large scale structure and the nature of the magnetic fields that arise. Finally, we discuss implications of intergalactic magnetic fields. Accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews. Pdf with full resolution figures can be downloaded from http://canopus.cnu.ac.kr/ryu/cosmic-mag2.pdf

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fergus J. Couch; Karoline Kuchenbaecker; Kyriaki Michailidou; Janna Lilyquist; Curtis Olswold; Emily Hallberg; Simona Agata; Habibul Ahsan; Christine B. Ambrosone; Irene L. Andrulis; +206 more
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
    Countries: United Kingdom, Finland, United Kingdom, Belgium, Belgium, Iceland, Spain, Spain, Norway, Germany ...
    Project: NWO | Secure and gentle grip of... (2300183393), NIH | A genome-wide association... (5R01CA128978-02), WT , EC | COGS (223175), NIH | Elucidating Loci Involved... (5U19CA148537-02), CIHR , NIH | Discovery Expansion and R... (5U19CA148065-04), NIH | Follow-up of Ovarian Canc... (3U19CA148112-04S1)

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. B.C.A.C. was funded through a European Community Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no 223175 (HEALTH-F2-2009-223175; COGS); Cancer Research UK (C1287/A10118, C1287/A10710, C12292/A11174, C1281/A12014, C5047/A8384, C5047/A15007, C5047/A10692); the National Institutes of Health Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Breast Cancer (CA116201), R01 grants (CA128978, CA176785, CA192393), and Post-Cancer GWAS initiative (1U19 CA148537, 1U19 CA148065 and 1U19 CA148112 - the GAME-ON initiative); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for the CIHR Team in Familial Risks of Breast Cancer, the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation, and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. CIMBA genotyping was supported by National Institutes of Health grant (CA128978); the Department of Defence (W81XWH-10-1-0341); and the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation. CIMBA data management and data analysis were supported by Cancer Research UK grants C12292/A11174 and C1287/A10118. This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Nature Publishing Group via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11375

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . Preprint . 2015 . Embargo End Date: 17 Mar 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rok Roškar; Davide Fiacconi; Lucio Mayer; Stelios Kazantzidis; Thomas R. Quinn; James Wadsley;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: NSF | Programs on Critical Prob... (1066293), SNSF | Galaxy formation and mass... (152960)

    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 449 (1) ISSN:0035-8711 ISSN:1365-2966 ISSN:1365-8711

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anne Lise Courbis; Ruth Murray; Sylvie Arnavielhe; Davide Caimmi; Anna Bedbrook; Michiel van Eerd; Govert De Vries; Gérard Dray; Ioana Agache; Mário Morais-Almeida; +32 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Countries: France, Turkey, Greece, Finland

    Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) management has changed in recent years following the switch from the concept of disease severity to the concept of disease control, publication of the AR clinical decision support system (CDSS) and development of mobile health (m-health) tools for patients (eg Allergy Diary). The Allergy Diary Companion app for healthcare providers is currently being developed and will be launched in 2018. It incorporates the AR CDSS to provide evidence-based treatment recommendations, linking all key stakeholders in AR management. Objective: To produce an electronic version of the AR CDSS (e-CDSS) for incorporation into the Allergy Diary Companion, to describe the app interfaces used to collect information necessary to inform the e-CDSS and to summarize some key features of the Allergy Diary Companion. Methods: The steps involved in producing the e-CDSS and incorporating it into the Allergy Diary Companion were (a) generation of treatment management scenarios; (b) expert consensus on treatment recommendations; (c) generation of electronic decisional algorithms to describe all AR CDSS scenarios; (d) digitization of these algorithms to form the e-CDSS; and (e) embedding the e-CDSS into the app to permit easy user e-CDSS interfacing. Results: Key experts in the AR field agreed on the AR CDSS approach to AR management and on specific treatment recommendations provided by Allergy Diary Companion. Based on this consensus, decision processes were developed and programmed into the Allergy Diary Companion using Titanium Appcelerator (JavaScript) for IOS tablets. To our knowledge, this is the first time the development of any m-health tool has been described in this transparent and detailed way, providing confidence, not only in the app, but also in the provided management recommendations. Conclusion: The Allergy Diary Companion for providers provides guideline and expert-endorsed AR management recommendations. [MASK paper No 32]. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atsuhiko Ichimura; Akira Hirasawa; Odile Poulain-Godefroy; Amélie Bonnefond; Takafumi Hara; Loic Yengo; Ikuo Kimura; Audrey Leloire; Ning Liu; Keiko Iida; +34 more
    Countries: Germany, Belgium
    Project: EC | EUROCHIP (241592), UKRI | Centre for molecular-base... (G0600705)

    Free fatty acids provide an important energy source as nutrients, and act as signalling molecules in various cellular processes. Several G-protein-coupled receptors have been identified as free-fatty-acid receptors important in physiology as well as in several diseases. GPR120 (also known as O3FAR1) functions as a receptor for unsaturated long-chain free fatty acids and has a critical role in various physiological homeostasis mechanisms such as adipogenesis, regulation of appetite and food preference. Here we show that GPR120-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet develop obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver with decreased adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis and enhanced hepatic lipogenesis. Insulin resistance in such mice is associated with reduced insulin signalling and enhanced inflammation in adipose tissue. In human, we show that GPR120 expression in adipose tissue is significantly higher in obese individuals than in lean controls. GPR120 exon sequencing in obese subjects reveals a deleterious non-synonymous mutation (p.R270H) that inhibits GPR120 signalling activity. Furthermore, the p.R270H variant increases the risk of obesity in European populations. Overall, this study demonstrates that the lipid sensor GPR120 has a key role in sensing dietary fat and, therefore, in the control of energy balance in both humans and rodents. 脂肪センサーGPR120が食事性肥満の原因遺伝子であることの発見. 京都大学プレスリリース. 2012-02-20.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kuba Krys; C. Melanie Vauclair; Colin A. Capaldi; Vivian Miu-Chi Lun; Michael Harris Bond; Alejandra Domínguez-Espinosa; Cláudio Vaz Torres; Ottmar V. Lipp; L. Sam S Manickam; Cai Xing; +31 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Denmark, Italy, Colombia, Argentina, Portugal, Switzerland
    Project: FCT | UID/PSI/03125/2013 (UID/PSI/03125/2013)

    Smiling individuals are usually perceived more favorably than non-smiling ones—they are judged as happier, more attractive, competent, and friendly. These seemingly clear and obvious consequences of smiling are assumed to be culturally universal, however most of the psychological research is carried out in WEIRD societies (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) and the influence of culture on social perception of nonverbal behavior is still understudied. Here we show that a smiling individual may be judged as less intelligent than the same non-smiling individual in cultures low on the GLOBE’s uncertainty avoidance dimension. Furthermore, we show that corruption at the societal level may undermine the prosocial perception of smiling—in societies with high corruption indicators, trust toward smiling individuals is reduced. This research fosters understanding of the cultural framework surrounding nonverbal communication processes and reveals that in some cultures smiling may lead to negative attributions. La lista completa de autores que integran el documento puede consultarse en el archivo Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2008
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ãlvarez Gonzãlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; +190 more
    Countries: United States, Belgium, Switzerland, Cyprus, United Kingdom, Italy, Italy

    We describe a measurement of the W boson mass m(W) using 200 pb(-1) of root s=1.96 TeV p (p) over bar collision data taken with the CDF II detector. With a sample of 63 964 W -> e nu candidates and 51 128 W -> mu nu candidates, we measure m(W) = [80.413 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.034(sys) = 80.413 +/- 0.048] GeV/c(2). This is the single most precise m(W) measurement to date. When combined with other measured electroweak parameters, this result further constrains the properties of new unobserved particles coupling to W and Z bosons. RI Ruiz, Alberto/E-4473-2011; Robson, Aidan/G-1087-2011; De Cecco, Sandro/B-1016-2012; Prokoshin, Fedor/E-2795-2012; Azzi, Patrizia/H-5404-2012

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    L. Tezcan; J. Vente; E. Zagal; A. Zeiliguer; Luca Salvati; Costas Kosmas; Orestis Kairis; Christos A. Karavitis; Sanem Acikalin; M. Alcalá; +42 more
    Countries: Netherlands, France, Netherlands

    Abstract The abandonment of land is a global problem with environmental and socioeconomic implications. An approach to assess the relationship between land abandonment and a large set of indicators was illustrated in the present study by using data collected in the framework of the European Union DESIRE research project from 808 field sites located in 10 study sites in the Mediterranean region, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa and Asia. A total of 48 indicators provided information for biophysical conditions and socioeconomic characteristics measured at the plot level. The selected indicators refer to farm characteristics (family status, land tenure, present and previous types of land-use, soil depth, slope gradient, tillage operations) and to site-specific characteristics including annual rainfall, rainfall seasonality and water availability. Classes were designated for each indicator and a sensitivity score was assigned to each class based on existing research or empirically assessing the importance of each indicator to the land abandonment issue. Questionnaires for each process of land degradation were prepared and data were collected at field site level in collaboration with land users. Based on correlation statistics and multivariate analyses more than ten indicators out of 48 resulted as significant in affecting land abandonment in the studied field sites. Among them, the most important were rainfall seasonality, elderly index, land fragmentation, farm size, selected soil properties, and the level of policy implementation. Results contribute to the development of appropriate tools for assessing the effectiveness of land management practices for contrasting land abandonment.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
2,781 Research products, page 1 of 279
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Claudio Maffeis; Niels H Birkebaek; Maia Konstantinova; Anke Schwandt; Andriani Vazeou; Kristina Casteels; Sujata M Jali; Catarina Limbert; Auste Pundziute-Lycka; Péter Tóth-Heyn; +13 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Country: Portugal

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of underweight (UW), overweight (OW), and obesity in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D).METHODS: An international cross-sectional study including 23 026 T1D children (2-18 years, duration of diabetes ≥1 year) participating in the SWEET prospective, multicenter diabetes registry. Body mass index SD score (BMI-SDS) was calculated using the World Health Organization BMI charts. Children were categorized as UW (BMI-SDS < -2SD), OW (+1SD < BMI-SDS ≤ +2SD), and obese (OB) (BMI-SDS > +2SD). Hierarchic regression models were applied with adjustment for sex, age, and duration of diabetes.RESULTS: The prevalence of UW, OW, and obesity was: 1.4%, 22.3%, and 7.3% in males and 0.6%, 27.2%, and 6.8% in females. Adjusted BMI-SDS was significantly higher in females than in males (mean ± SEM: 0.54 ± 0.05 vs 0.40 ± 0.05, P < 0.0001). In males, BMI-SDS significantly decreased by age (P < 0.0001) in the first three age categories 0.61 ± 0.06 (2 to <10 years), 0.47 ± 0.06 (10 to <13 years), 0.34 ± 0.05 (13 to <16 years). In females, BMI-SDS showed a U-shaped distribution by age (P < 0.0001): 0.54 ± 0.04 (2 to <10 years), 0.39 ± 0.04 (10 to <13 years), 0.55 ± 0.04 (13 to <16 years). BMI-SDS increased by diabetes duration (<2 years: 0.38 ± 0.05, 2 to <5 years: 0.44 ± 0.05, and ≥5 years: 0.50 ± 0.05, P < 0.0001). Treatment modality did not affect BMI-SDS. Adjusted HbA1c was significantly higher in females than in males (8.20% ± 0.10% vs 8.06% ± 0.10%, P < 0.0001). In both genders, the association between HbA1c and BMI-SDS was U-shaped with the highest HbA1c in the UW and obesity groups.CONCLUSIONS: The high rate of OW and obesity (31.8%) emphasize the need for developing further strategies to prevent and treat excess fat accumulation in T1D.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Other literature type . 2013
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sarah E. Medland; Jaime Derringer; Jian Yang; Tõnu Esko; Nicolas W. Martin; Konstantin Shakhbazov; Abdel Abdellaoui; Arpana Agrawal; Eva Albrecht; Behrooz Z. Alizadeh; +173 more
    Countries: Netherlands, United States, United Kingdom, Croatia, Australia
    Project: WT , NIH | FINANCIAL STATUS--RETIREM... (2P01AG005842-04), NIH | ECONOMICS OF AGING TRAINI... (5T32AG000186-10), EC | DEVHEALTH (269874), NSF | EAGER Proposal: Workshop ... (1064089), EC | GMI (230374), NIH | NBER Center for Aging and... (5P30AG012810-15)

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of educational attainment was conducted in a discovery sample of 101,069 individuals and a replication sample of 25,490. Three independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are genome-wide significant (rs9320913, rs11584700, rs4851266), and all three replicate. Estimated effects sizes are small (coefficient of determination R2 ≈ 0.02%), approximately 1 month of schooling per allele. A linear polygenic score from all measured SNPs accounts for ≈2% of the variance in both educational attainment and cognitive function. Genes in the region of the loci have previously been associated with health, cognitive, and central nervous system phenotypes, and bioinformatics analyses suggest the involvement of the anterior caudate nucleus. These findings provide promising candidate SNPs for follow-up work, and our effect size estimates can anchor power analyses in social-science genetics. Economics

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . 2011
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Dongsu Ryu; Dominik R. G. Schleicher; Rudolf A. Treumann; Christos G. Tsagas; Lawrence M. Widrow;
    Project: EC | ESO-FEL-ALMA08 (229517), NSERC

    Magnetic fields appear to be ubiquitous in astrophysical environments. Their existence in the intracluster medium is established through observations of synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation. On the other hand, the nature of magnetic fields outside of clusters, where observations are scarce and controversial, remains largely unknown. In this chapter, we review recent developments in our understanding of the nature and origin of intergalactic magnetic fields, and in particular, intercluster fields. A plausible scenario for the origin of galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields is for seed fields, created in the early universe, to be amplified by turbulent flows induced during the formation of the large scale structure. We present several mechanisms for the generation of seed fields both before and after recombination. We then discuss the evolution and role of magnetic fields during the formation of the first starts. We describe the turbulent amplification of seed fields during the formation of large scale structure and the nature of the magnetic fields that arise. Finally, we discuss implications of intergalactic magnetic fields. Accepted for publication in Space Science Reviews. Pdf with full resolution figures can be downloaded from http://canopus.cnu.ac.kr/ryu/cosmic-mag2.pdf

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Fergus J. Couch; Karoline Kuchenbaecker; Kyriaki Michailidou; Janna Lilyquist; Curtis Olswold; Emily Hallberg; Simona Agata; Habibul Ahsan; Christine B. Ambrosone; Irene L. Andrulis; +206 more
    Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
    Countries: United Kingdom, Finland, United Kingdom, Belgium, Belgium, Iceland, Spain, Spain, Norway, Germany ...
    Project: NWO | Secure and gentle grip of... (2300183393), NIH | A genome-wide association... (5R01CA128978-02), WT , EC | COGS (223175), NIH | Elucidating Loci Involved... (5U19CA148537-02), CIHR , NIH | Discovery Expansion and R... (5U19CA148065-04), NIH | Follow-up of Ovarian Canc... (3U19CA148112-04S1)

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. B.C.A.C. was funded through a European Community Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no 223175 (HEALTH-F2-2009-223175; COGS); Cancer Research UK (C1287/A10118, C1287/A10710, C12292/A11174, C1281/A12014, C5047/A8384, C5047/A15007, C5047/A10692); the National Institutes of Health Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Breast Cancer (CA116201), R01 grants (CA128978, CA176785, CA192393), and Post-Cancer GWAS initiative (1U19 CA148537, 1U19 CA148065 and 1U19 CA148112 - the GAME-ON initiative); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for the CIHR Team in Familial Risks of Breast Cancer, the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation, and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. CIMBA genotyping was supported by National Institutes of Health grant (CA128978); the Department of Defence (W81XWH-10-1-0341); and the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation. CIMBA data management and data analysis were supported by Cancer Research UK grants C12292/A11174 and C1287/A10118. This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Nature Publishing Group via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms11375

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . Preprint . 2015 . Embargo End Date: 17 Mar 2018
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rok Roškar; Davide Fiacconi; Lucio Mayer; Stelios Kazantzidis; Thomas R. Quinn; James Wadsley;
    Publisher: Oxford University Press
    Country: Switzerland
    Project: NSF | Programs on Critical Prob... (1066293), SNSF | Galaxy formation and mass... (152960)

    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 449 (1) ISSN:0035-8711 ISSN:1365-2966 ISSN:1365-8711

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Anne Lise Courbis; Ruth Murray; Sylvie Arnavielhe; Davide Caimmi; Anna Bedbrook; Michiel van Eerd; Govert De Vries; Gérard Dray; Ioana Agache; Mário Morais-Almeida; +32 more
    Publisher: Wiley
    Countries: France, Turkey, Greece, Finland

    Background: Allergic rhinitis (AR) management has changed in recent years following the switch from the concept of disease severity to the concept of disease control, publication of the AR clinical decision support system (CDSS) and development of mobile health (m-health) tools for patients (eg Allergy Diary). The Allergy Diary Companion app for healthcare providers is currently being developed and will be launched in 2018. It incorporates the AR CDSS to provide evidence-based treatment recommendations, linking all key stakeholders in AR management. Objective: To produce an electronic version of the AR CDSS (e-CDSS) for incorporation into the Allergy Diary Companion, to describe the app interfaces used to collect information necessary to inform the e-CDSS and to summarize some key features of the Allergy Diary Companion. Methods: The steps involved in producing the e-CDSS and incorporating it into the Allergy Diary Companion were (a) generation of treatment management scenarios; (b) expert consensus on treatment recommendations; (c) generation of electronic decisional algorithms to describe all AR CDSS scenarios; (d) digitization of these algorithms to form the e-CDSS; and (e) embedding the e-CDSS into the app to permit easy user e-CDSS interfacing. Results: Key experts in the AR field agreed on the AR CDSS approach to AR management and on specific treatment recommendations provided by Allergy Diary Companion. Based on this consensus, decision processes were developed and programmed into the Allergy Diary Companion using Titanium Appcelerator (JavaScript) for IOS tablets. To our knowledge, this is the first time the development of any m-health tool has been described in this transparent and detailed way, providing confidence, not only in the app, but also in the provided management recommendations. Conclusion: The Allergy Diary Companion for providers provides guideline and expert-endorsed AR management recommendations. [MASK paper No 32]. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atsuhiko Ichimura; Akira Hirasawa; Odile Poulain-Godefroy; Amélie Bonnefond; Takafumi Hara; Loic Yengo; Ikuo Kimura; Audrey Leloire; Ning Liu; Keiko Iida; +34 more
    Countries: Germany, Belgium
    Project: EC | EUROCHIP (241592), UKRI | Centre for molecular-base... (G0600705)

    Free fatty acids provide an important energy source as nutrients, and act as signalling molecules in various cellular processes. Several G-protein-coupled receptors have been identified as free-fatty-acid receptors important in physiology as well as in several diseases. GPR120 (also known as O3FAR1) functions as a receptor for unsaturated long-chain free fatty acids and has a critical role in various physiological homeostasis mechanisms such as adipogenesis, regulation of appetite and food preference. Here we show that GPR120-deficient mice fed a high-fat diet develop obesity, glucose intolerance and fatty liver with decreased adipocyte differentiation and lipogenesis and enhanced hepatic lipogenesis. Insulin resistance in such mice is associated with reduced insulin signalling and enhanced inflammation in adipose tissue. In human, we show that GPR120 expression in adipose tissue is significantly higher in obese individuals than in lean controls. GPR120 exon sequencing in obese subjects reveals a deleterious non-synonymous mutation (p.R270H) that inhibits GPR120 signalling activity. Furthermore, the p.R270H variant increases the risk of obesity in European populations. Overall, this study demonstrates that the lipid sensor GPR120 has a key role in sensing dietary fat and, therefore, in the control of energy balance in both humans and rodents. 脂肪センサーGPR120が食事性肥満の原因遺伝子であることの発見. 京都大学プレスリリース. 2012-02-20.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kuba Krys; C. Melanie Vauclair; Colin A. Capaldi; Vivian Miu-Chi Lun; Michael Harris Bond; Alejandra Domínguez-Espinosa; Cláudio Vaz Torres; Ottmar V. Lipp; L. Sam S Manickam; Cai Xing; +31 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Denmark, Italy, Colombia, Argentina, Portugal, Switzerland
    Project: FCT | UID/PSI/03125/2013 (UID/PSI/03125/2013)

    Smiling individuals are usually perceived more favorably than non-smiling ones—they are judged as happier, more attractive, competent, and friendly. These seemingly clear and obvious consequences of smiling are assumed to be culturally universal, however most of the psychological research is carried out in WEIRD societies (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) and the influence of culture on social perception of nonverbal behavior is still understudied. Here we show that a smiling individual may be judged as less intelligent than the same non-smiling individual in cultures low on the GLOBE’s uncertainty avoidance dimension. Furthermore, we show that corruption at the societal level may undermine the prosocial perception of smiling—in societies with high corruption indicators, trust toward smiling individuals is reduced. This research fosters understanding of the cultural framework surrounding nonverbal communication processes and reveals that in some cultures smiling may lead to negative attributions. La lista completa de autores que integran el documento puede consultarse en el archivo Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . 2008
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aaltonen, T.; Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ãlvarez Gonzãlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; +190 more
    Countries: United States, Belgium, Switzerland, Cyprus, United Kingdom, Italy, Italy

    We describe a measurement of the W boson mass m(W) using 200 pb(-1) of root s=1.96 TeV p (p) over bar collision data taken with the CDF II detector. With a sample of 63 964 W -> e nu candidates and 51 128 W -> mu nu candidates, we measure m(W) = [80.413 +/- 0.034(stat) +/- 0.034(sys) = 80.413 +/- 0.048] GeV/c(2). This is the single most precise m(W) measurement to date. When combined with other measured electroweak parameters, this result further constrains the properties of new unobserved particles coupling to W and Z bosons. RI Ruiz, Alberto/E-4473-2011; Robson, Aidan/G-1087-2011; De Cecco, Sandro/B-1016-2012; Prokoshin, Fedor/E-2795-2012; Azzi, Patrizia/H-5404-2012

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    L. Tezcan; J. Vente; E. Zagal; A. Zeiliguer; Luca Salvati; Costas Kosmas; Orestis Kairis; Christos A. Karavitis; Sanem Acikalin; M. Alcalá; +42 more
    Countries: Netherlands, France, Netherlands

    Abstract The abandonment of land is a global problem with environmental and socioeconomic implications. An approach to assess the relationship between land abandonment and a large set of indicators was illustrated in the present study by using data collected in the framework of the European Union DESIRE research project from 808 field sites located in 10 study sites in the Mediterranean region, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa and Asia. A total of 48 indicators provided information for biophysical conditions and socioeconomic characteristics measured at the plot level. The selected indicators refer to farm characteristics (family status, land tenure, present and previous types of land-use, soil depth, slope gradient, tillage operations) and to site-specific characteristics including annual rainfall, rainfall seasonality and water availability. Classes were designated for each indicator and a sensitivity score was assigned to each class based on existing research or empirically assessing the importance of each indicator to the land abandonment issue. Questionnaires for each process of land degradation were prepared and data were collected at field site level in collaboration with land users. Based on correlation statistics and multivariate analyses more than ten indicators out of 48 resulted as significant in affecting land abandonment in the studied field sites. Among them, the most important were rainfall seasonality, elderly index, land fragmentation, farm size, selected soil properties, and the level of policy implementation. Results contribute to the development of appropriate tools for assessing the effectiveness of land management practices for contrasting land abandonment.