search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
138 Research products, page 1 of 14

  • Canada
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2021-2021
  • VIUSpace

10
arrow_drop_down
Relevance
arrow_drop_down
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stewart Ryan, Sherry;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Berberis thunbergii. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25209/StewartRyan2.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kipot, Nina;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Paeonia lactiflora. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25204/Kipot.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Plante, Sylvie;
    Country: Canada

    This synthesis paper introduces a conceptual model which explains how boundary spanning practices use relational, cognitive and structural social capital to facilitate innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Social capital is a multidimensional concept used by scholars from different disciplines to demonstrate the benefits of accessing resources through relationships in social networks. Past research has shown that social capital can accelerate positive innovation outcomes for organizations facing complex challenges, including PPPs that seek to share costs, resources and risks across sectors to develop and sustain competitive advantage. In practice, many PPPs fail to achieve anticipated innovation outcomes, due in part to a breakdown of social relations between partners. The conceptual model is described and illustrated across three components of the dissertation by portfolio: Journal article, online course/learning module and instructional video. Based on results of a qualitative research study that investigated critical incidents on innovation projects in PPPs from the perspectives of public and private sector innovators, the model identifies practices that help leaders across sectors find ways to collaborate more effectively to manage innovation. Three modes of inference were used to analyse interview data, which referenced different industries and types of innovation, producing a holistic understanding of the interaction of social capital and innovation in PPPs. A critical realist, interdisciplinary approach combined theory and empirical data to identify generative mechanisms of innovation outcomes on PPP projects. A knowledge dissemination section describes how the research findings are being made accessible to meet the needs of practitioners as well as academic researchers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Millward, Steve;
    Country: Canada

    Front-line maintenance supervisors play a key role at BC Transit, as this role directly interacts with and oversees front-line staff. These front-line leaders are responsible for overseeing most of the organization’s communications and change initiatives. This research investigates the front-line leadership role that organizations rely on as their main conduit for communication of organizational goals and change management initiatives to front-line staff. Front-line leadership roles are the roles in an organization that deal directly with the front-line staff daily. This research investigated the challenges a front-line leader can face while working in this role. This research study engaged BC Transit’s front-line maintenance supervisors and the front-line staff from two different sites within the greater Victoria, British Columbia area. The main research question asked was, “how can BC Transit assist in the development of front-line maintenance supervisors so that they develop the capabilities and skills to lead front-line staff effectively?” Based on this overarching research question, data was collected from a focus group and an online survey that revealed five themes: define and document roles and responsibilities, strengthen hiring processes, develop formal training, focus on team-building and resolve communication barriers. Recommendations offer strategies for the development of front-line leaders, including enhancing overall support for front-line leaders and relationships between front-line leaders and the front-line staff. Keywords: front-line leadership, communication, development, relationships, roles and responsibilities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hoffe, Samuel;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Winning essay - English Department Competition 2021-2022 Winning essay - English Department Competition ENGL 115 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26017/Hoffe.pdf?sequence=4&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atleo, Tyson;
    Country: Canada

    Clayoquot Sound is a remarkable and rare coastal temperate rainforest ecosystem on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. It is home to the Indigenous Ahousaht Nation and a place where chinook salmon and people are interdependent. The health and well-being of the Ahousaht community have been reliant on the Nation’s relationship to salmon for many generations. The Ahousaht stewarded the chinook salmon in the Megin River successfully and sustainably for generations through their complex traditional Indigenous legal system. Now, the genetically diverse population of chinook salmon in the Megin River is on the verge of extinction as the salmon face several human-caused ecological and socio-political threats. In this paper, I specifically explored the relationship between the decline of Megin River chinook salmon and the decline of Ahousaht traditional law as a wicked problem. I used a qualitative approach that combines Indigenous and Western methodologies, such as: systems thinking; describing the biophysical and socio-cultural attributes of the Megin River; ethnographic interviews with knowledge holders; developing a framework for articulating the traditional Ahousaht legal system; and, making recommendations to address the problem. I concluded that the timeline of replacing the traditional Ahousaht legal system (a legal system of spiritual and natural characteristics derived from the Ahousaht relationship to life-giving forces in the region) with that of Canadian law (a legal system of economic and social policy foreign to the natural cycles of the region) corresponds directly with the decline of the Megin River chinook and should be considered as one of the causes of decline. I recommend that additional research be conducted using a systems thinking approach to identify where systemic interventions are required to build new relationships, structures, and institutions that uphold Indigenous knowledge and legal frameworks to address conservation challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ashton Wagner, Doreen;
    Country: Canada

    Purpose – This study draws from ecological systems theory (EST) as the conceptual basis to answer the question: what affects the entrepreneurial resilience of rural women business owners in a time of crisis? Design/methodology/approach – Evidence was gathered from two in-depth interviews with each of 13 participants, three months apart, during the 2020-2021 pandemic. Thematic analysis was applied, along with measures to ensure trustworthiness. Findings – Immediate social contexts challenged entrepreneurial resilience with family care obligations, homeschooling, and unsupportive close relationships. Certain institutional contexts such as enterprises’ industry and business models also demanded more resilience – with healthcare and in-person-only retail operations being most affected. Beyond contexts, entrepreneurial resilience ebbed and flowed with recursive ecosystem interactions especially with close, personal relationships. Business owners demonstrated agency with coping strategies to bolster resilience including focusing on community and collaboration, employing clarity around roles to navigate business and personal commitments, appropriate distancing from ecosystem relationships at critical times, and strategic application of new ways of doing business to accommodate COVID restrictions. Originality/value – This study is unique in that it was conducted as a significant health and economic crisis was unfolding, offering insight into the development of entrepreneurial resilience, over time, and focusing on a relatively unexplored field of rural women entrepreneurship. Keywords – Resilience, Entrepreneurial resilience, Women entrepreneurs, Rural entrepreneurs, Ecological systems theory Paper Type – Research paper

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Morley, Amber;
    Country: Canada

    In sporting industries, including the golf industry, there is a long-standing history of gendered practices events, exclusion, and “typical ‘ expectations” (Breger et al. 2019 p. 274 These practices are evident in golf through gendered language, gendered dress code, gendered history, gendered leagues, and gendered tee blocks. Specific gendered practices within the golf industry, such as gendered language, contribute to participants’ experiences in important ways. Through gendered language such as “cart girl,” and “lady golfer,” the golf industry is perpetuating gendered ideals, and through a gendered dress code and gender marked tee blocks, the industry is propagating ideas about women’s ability levels in the sport. Women’s professional golf is a topic of increasing academic concentration (Bowes Kitching, 2020a), but there is a gap in research regarding how gendered language and practices impact women in the industry. Golf is historically referred to as a “gentleman’s game” (Billings et al., 2018 p. 97) and has been historically exclusionary to women (Bowes et al., 2020a). Golf participation rates are also lower for women than for men, ( Snelgrove, Wood, 2015 and women often leave the sport due to the experiences they have through their involvement. Augusta National Golf Club, one of golf’s most distinguished golf clubs (Swart et al. 2003 where the Master’s Tournament takes place, did not allow female members to join as members until 2012. When they finally allowed their first two female members, it was a great win for women’s golf (Andrews 2012 p. 2) and allowing for more equitable participation in the industry. In addition, there is a history of policies that discriminate against women in golf, and often the experiences women have as a result of these exclusionary policies impacts their participation and comfort in participating. Often, the policies can also limit their involvement in the sport or impact retention and lead to more women leaving the sport. Largely, little research exists on women’s experience as participants in the sport (Mitchell et al., 2016). In recent years, diversity and women’s golf initiatives have been prominent in Ontario and the rest of Canada. In 2020, the PGA of Canada created a Diversity Inclusion Task Force with industry professionals to allow underrepresented populations the chance to participate in golf (PGA of Ontario, 2020). Golf Canada and the PGA of Canada launched a Women in Coaching program (Golf Canada, 2020), and Golf Canada and Golf Ontario have recently launched a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Strategic Alliance with Korn Ferry (Golf Ontario, 2020). These initiatives bring together diverse and underrepresented voices to contribute to diversity and inclusion in the golf industry and are significant in allowing various populations to experience the sport. However, more research is needed in the area of women in golf to accurately understand women’s experiences. Research concerning women in golf is fundamental as Canadian women continue to gain employment in the golf industry and increasingly play the sport. Women also have increasingly busy work and home lives, and “fewer are maintaining lifelong roles as engaged sport participants” (O’Reilly et al., 2018 p. 16). The trouble goes beyond the sphere of sports participation. Oftentimes, golf is in fact used to host informal business meetings, and when women miss out on participating in these types of opportunities, it can impact their career advancement. It is also well known that golf provides opportunity to men to socialize and strengthen networking, but it does not always have the same social benefit for women (Agarwal et al. 2016 This research aims to fill the gap in the literature surrounding women’s experience in the golf industry, including gendered roles and the assumptions women face. This thesis in particular, aims to gain insight into the gendered practices in golf from an insider’s perspective and raise awareness of how gendered practices affect women in the golf industry. Interviews with 10 female golfers who work in the industry were conducted with the aim of understanding how gendered practices in golf have impacted women in Ontario. This research contributes to the areas of sport sociology, gender studies, and communications studies with regard to sports and gender.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Iddrisu, Abdul-Latif;
    Country: Canada

    The inception of WTO in 1995 created renewed optimism among the developing nations that the economic prosperity from global trade would be equitably shared. However, over the 25-year period, only four African countries (South Africa, Egypt, and Morocco) have so far been involved in the WTO dispute settlement mechanism as either litigants or respondents. The research thesis examines the challenges faced by African countries and the reform proposals to enhance their participation in the WTO DSM process. A mixed qualitative research design approach was employed using primary research (online surveys), systematic review design and content analysis of the WTO cases. Thematic coding (analysis) approach was used to analyse information from the interview and the systematic review. Content analysis was employed to analyse the three case laws (WTO DS500, WTO DS327 and WTO DS578), involving South Africa, Egypt, Morocco, and Tunisia and two potential trade disputes involving African countries, which were not pursued further. The findings from the thematic and content analysis indicate that lack of transparency, perceived unfairness, limited human/legal resource, high litigation costs, ineffectiveness of the WTO DSB to enforce its own ruling and outdated WTO DSU rules represent the main challenges faced by African countries. The thesis acknowledges that reform proposals could be strengthened by plans to have an independent trading bloc (African Continental Free Trade Area), which would strengthen the continent’s bargaining power although lack of unity remains a challenge. There is also a need for review of the WTO rules, especially the restrictive agricultural subsidies agreement, anti-dumping rules and the compensation remedies under s. 21.5 and 22.2. The findings have significant implication for the need to enhance independence of the WTO DSB through decreasing its financial reliance from the advanced nations.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Niroo, Farnoosh; Van Winkle, Christine;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In recent years, novel and innovative ways to accommodate diners and visitors’ desire for new experiences have emerged (Warnaby & Shi, 2018). Pop-up restaurants are indicative of this growing trend to provide an appealing combination of experiences and food. Considering the temporary nature of pop-up restaurants, it is important to understand diners’ perceptions regarding the multiple dimensions of the pop-up dining experience compared to traditional dining-in restaurants. By taking a qualitative approach, this study explored diners’ perspectives of their experiences at pop-up restaurants. Semi-structured interviews were used to get a deep understanding of diners’ perceptions about various aspects of their pop-up dining experiences. An interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006) was conducted to answer two main research questions: 1) Is pop-up dining a memorable and meaningful experience compared to a traditional dining experience? 2) What are the qualities that create a memorable and meaningful pop-up restaurant experience? The findings demonstrate that the qualities which create a meaningful pop-up dining experience relate not only to the values offered by pop-up restaurants, but also to the personal values of the diners themselves. The connection between the value offered by the restaurant and the value perceived by diners is co-created and results in achieving experiential benefits for the diners. A model was proposed, based on the Service-Dominant Logic framework (Vargo & Lusch, 2008), to represent the co-creation of the experience at pop-up restaurants. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25241/Niroo&VanWinkle.pdf?sequence=3

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
138 Research products, page 1 of 14
  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Stewart Ryan, Sherry;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Berberis thunbergii. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25209/StewartRyan2.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Other research product . 2021
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kipot, Nina;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Pressed specimen of Paeonia lactiflora. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25204/Kipot.pdf?sequence=3&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Plante, Sylvie;
    Country: Canada

    This synthesis paper introduces a conceptual model which explains how boundary spanning practices use relational, cognitive and structural social capital to facilitate innovation in public-private partnerships (PPPs). Social capital is a multidimensional concept used by scholars from different disciplines to demonstrate the benefits of accessing resources through relationships in social networks. Past research has shown that social capital can accelerate positive innovation outcomes for organizations facing complex challenges, including PPPs that seek to share costs, resources and risks across sectors to develop and sustain competitive advantage. In practice, many PPPs fail to achieve anticipated innovation outcomes, due in part to a breakdown of social relations between partners. The conceptual model is described and illustrated across three components of the dissertation by portfolio: Journal article, online course/learning module and instructional video. Based on results of a qualitative research study that investigated critical incidents on innovation projects in PPPs from the perspectives of public and private sector innovators, the model identifies practices that help leaders across sectors find ways to collaborate more effectively to manage innovation. Three modes of inference were used to analyse interview data, which referenced different industries and types of innovation, producing a holistic understanding of the interaction of social capital and innovation in PPPs. A critical realist, interdisciplinary approach combined theory and empirical data to identify generative mechanisms of innovation outcomes on PPP projects. A knowledge dissemination section describes how the research findings are being made accessible to meet the needs of practitioners as well as academic researchers.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Millward, Steve;
    Country: Canada

    Front-line maintenance supervisors play a key role at BC Transit, as this role directly interacts with and oversees front-line staff. These front-line leaders are responsible for overseeing most of the organization’s communications and change initiatives. This research investigates the front-line leadership role that organizations rely on as their main conduit for communication of organizational goals and change management initiatives to front-line staff. Front-line leadership roles are the roles in an organization that deal directly with the front-line staff daily. This research investigated the challenges a front-line leader can face while working in this role. This research study engaged BC Transit’s front-line maintenance supervisors and the front-line staff from two different sites within the greater Victoria, British Columbia area. The main research question asked was, “how can BC Transit assist in the development of front-line maintenance supervisors so that they develop the capabilities and skills to lead front-line staff effectively?” Based on this overarching research question, data was collected from a focus group and an online survey that revealed five themes: define and document roles and responsibilities, strengthen hiring processes, develop formal training, focus on team-building and resolve communication barriers. Recommendations offer strategies for the development of front-line leaders, including enhancing overall support for front-line leaders and relationships between front-line leaders and the front-line staff. Keywords: front-line leadership, communication, development, relationships, roles and responsibilities.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Hoffe, Samuel;
    Publisher: Electronic version published by Vancouver Island University
    Country: Canada

    Winning essay - English Department Competition 2021-2022 Winning essay - English Department Competition ENGL 115 https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/26017/Hoffe.pdf?sequence=4&isAllowed=y

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Atleo, Tyson;
    Country: Canada

    Clayoquot Sound is a remarkable and rare coastal temperate rainforest ecosystem on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. It is home to the Indigenous Ahousaht Nation and a place where chinook salmon and people are interdependent. The health and well-being of the Ahousaht community have been reliant on the Nation’s relationship to salmon for many generations. The Ahousaht stewarded the chinook salmon in the Megin River successfully and sustainably for generations through their complex traditional Indigenous legal system. Now, the genetically diverse population of chinook salmon in the Megin River is on the verge of extinction as the salmon face several human-caused ecological and socio-political threats. In this paper, I specifically explored the relationship between the decline of Megin River chinook salmon and the decline of Ahousaht traditional law as a wicked problem. I used a qualitative approach that combines Indigenous and Western methodologies, such as: systems thinking; describing the biophysical and socio-cultural attributes of the Megin River; ethnographic interviews with knowledge holders; developing a framework for articulating the traditional Ahousaht legal system; and, making recommendations to address the problem. I concluded that the timeline of replacing the traditional Ahousaht legal system (a legal system of spiritual and natural characteristics derived from the Ahousaht relationship to life-giving forces in the region) with that of Canadian law (a legal system of economic and social policy foreign to the natural cycles of the region) corresponds directly with the decline of the Megin River chinook and should be considered as one of the causes of decline. I recommend that additional research be conducted using a systems thinking approach to identify where systemic interventions are required to build new relationships, structures, and institutions that uphold Indigenous knowledge and legal frameworks to address conservation challenges.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Ashton Wagner, Doreen;
    Country: Canada

    Purpose – This study draws from ecological systems theory (EST) as the conceptual basis to answer the question: what affects the entrepreneurial resilience of rural women business owners in a time of crisis? Design/methodology/approach – Evidence was gathered from two in-depth interviews with each of 13 participants, three months apart, during the 2020-2021 pandemic. Thematic analysis was applied, along with measures to ensure trustworthiness. Findings – Immediate social contexts challenged entrepreneurial resilience with family care obligations, homeschooling, and unsupportive close relationships. Certain institutional contexts such as enterprises’ industry and business models also demanded more resilience – with healthcare and in-person-only retail operations being most affected. Beyond contexts, entrepreneurial resilience ebbed and flowed with recursive ecosystem interactions especially with close, personal relationships. Business owners demonstrated agency with coping strategies to bolster resilience including focusing on community and collaboration, employing clarity around roles to navigate business and personal commitments, appropriate distancing from ecosystem relationships at critical times, and strategic application of new ways of doing business to accommodate COVID restrictions. Originality/value – This study is unique in that it was conducted as a significant health and economic crisis was unfolding, offering insight into the development of entrepreneurial resilience, over time, and focusing on a relatively unexplored field of rural women entrepreneurship. Keywords – Resilience, Entrepreneurial resilience, Women entrepreneurs, Rural entrepreneurs, Ecological systems theory Paper Type – Research paper

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Morley, Amber;
    Country: Canada

    In sporting industries, including the golf industry, there is a long-standing history of gendered practices events, exclusion, and “typical ‘ expectations” (Breger et al. 2019 p. 274 These practices are evident in golf through gendered language, gendered dress code, gendered history, gendered leagues, and gendered tee blocks. Specific gendered practices within the golf industry, such as gendered language, contribute to participants’ experiences in important ways. Through gendered language such as “cart girl,” and “lady golfer,” the golf industry is perpetuating gendered ideals, and through a gendered dress code and gender marked tee blocks, the industry is propagating ideas about women’s ability levels in the sport. Women’s professional golf is a topic of increasing academic concentration (Bowes Kitching, 2020a), but there is a gap in research regarding how gendered language and practices impact women in the industry. Golf is historically referred to as a “gentleman’s game” (Billings et al., 2018 p. 97) and has been historically exclusionary to women (Bowes et al., 2020a). Golf participation rates are also lower for women than for men, ( Snelgrove, Wood, 2015 and women often leave the sport due to the experiences they have through their involvement. Augusta National Golf Club, one of golf’s most distinguished golf clubs (Swart et al. 2003 where the Master’s Tournament takes place, did not allow female members to join as members until 2012. When they finally allowed their first two female members, it was a great win for women’s golf (Andrews 2012 p. 2) and allowing for more equitable participation in the industry. In addition, there is a history of policies that discriminate against women in golf, and often the experiences women have as a result of these exclusionary policies impacts their participation and comfort in participating. Often, the policies can also limit their involvement in the sport or impact retention and lead to more women leaving the sport. Largely, little research exists on women’s experience as participants in the sport (Mitchell et al., 2016). In recent years, diversity and women’s golf initiatives have been prominent in Ontario and the rest of Canada. In 2020, the PGA of Canada created a Diversity Inclusion Task Force with industry professionals to allow underrepresented populations the chance to participate in golf (PGA of Ontario, 2020). Golf Canada and the PGA of Canada launched a Women in Coaching program (Golf Canada, 2020), and Golf Canada and Golf Ontario have recently launched a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Strategic Alliance with Korn Ferry (Golf Ontario, 2020). These initiatives bring together diverse and underrepresented voices to contribute to diversity and inclusion in the golf industry and are significant in allowing various populations to experience the sport. However, more research is needed in the area of women in golf to accurately understand women’s experiences. Research concerning women in golf is fundamental as Canadian women continue to gain employment in the golf industry and increasingly play the sport. Women also have increasingly busy work and home lives, and “fewer are maintaining lifelong roles as engaged sport participants” (O’Reilly et al., 2018 p. 16). The trouble goes beyond the sphere of sports participation. Oftentimes, golf is in fact used to host informal business meetings, and when women miss out on participating in these types of opportunities, it can impact their career advancement. It is also well known that golf provides opportunity to men to socialize and strengthen networking, but it does not always have the same social benefit for women (Agarwal et al. 2016 This research aims to fill the gap in the literature surrounding women’s experience in the golf industry, including gendered roles and the assumptions women face. This thesis in particular, aims to gain insight into the gendered practices in golf from an insider’s perspective and raise awareness of how gendered practices affect women in the golf industry. Interviews with 10 female golfers who work in the industry were conducted with the aim of understanding how gendered practices in golf have impacted women in Ontario. This research contributes to the areas of sport sociology, gender studies, and communications studies with regard to sports and gender.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Iddrisu, Abdul-Latif;
    Country: Canada

    The inception of WTO in 1995 created renewed optimism among the developing nations that the economic prosperity from global trade would be equitably shared. However, over the 25-year period, only four African countries (South Africa, Egypt, and Morocco) have so far been involved in the WTO dispute settlement mechanism as either litigants or respondents. The research thesis examines the challenges faced by African countries and the reform proposals to enhance their participation in the WTO DSM process. A mixed qualitative research design approach was employed using primary research (online surveys), systematic review design and content analysis of the WTO cases. Thematic coding (analysis) approach was used to analyse information from the interview and the systematic review. Content analysis was employed to analyse the three case laws (WTO DS500, WTO DS327 and WTO DS578), involving South Africa, Egypt, Morocco, and Tunisia and two potential trade disputes involving African countries, which were not pursued further. The findings from the thematic and content analysis indicate that lack of transparency, perceived unfairness, limited human/legal resource, high litigation costs, ineffectiveness of the WTO DSB to enforce its own ruling and outdated WTO DSU rules represent the main challenges faced by African countries. The thesis acknowledges that reform proposals could be strengthened by plans to have an independent trading bloc (African Continental Free Trade Area), which would strengthen the continent’s bargaining power although lack of unity remains a challenge. There is also a need for review of the WTO rules, especially the restrictive agricultural subsidies agreement, anti-dumping rules and the compensation remedies under s. 21.5 and 22.2. The findings have significant implication for the need to enhance independence of the WTO DSB through decreasing its financial reliance from the advanced nations.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Niroo, Farnoosh; Van Winkle, Christine;
    Publisher: VIU Press
    Country: Canada

    In recent years, novel and innovative ways to accommodate diners and visitors’ desire for new experiences have emerged (Warnaby & Shi, 2018). Pop-up restaurants are indicative of this growing trend to provide an appealing combination of experiences and food. Considering the temporary nature of pop-up restaurants, it is important to understand diners’ perceptions regarding the multiple dimensions of the pop-up dining experience compared to traditional dining-in restaurants. By taking a qualitative approach, this study explored diners’ perspectives of their experiences at pop-up restaurants. Semi-structured interviews were used to get a deep understanding of diners’ perceptions about various aspects of their pop-up dining experiences. An interpretive thematic analysis (Braun & Clark, 2006) was conducted to answer two main research questions: 1) Is pop-up dining a memorable and meaningful experience compared to a traditional dining experience? 2) What are the qualities that create a memorable and meaningful pop-up restaurant experience? The findings demonstrate that the qualities which create a meaningful pop-up dining experience relate not only to the values offered by pop-up restaurants, but also to the personal values of the diners themselves. The connection between the value offered by the restaurant and the value perceived by diners is co-created and results in achieving experiential benefits for the diners. A model was proposed, based on the Service-Dominant Logic framework (Vargo & Lusch, 2008), to represent the co-creation of the experience at pop-up restaurants. https://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/25241/Niroo&VanWinkle.pdf?sequence=3