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379 Research products, page 1 of 38

  • Canada
  • Research software
  • Other research products
  • 2013-2022
  • Scholarship@Western

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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Pantaleon Rodriguez, Ulises;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    My name is Ulises Pantaleon Rodriguez and I am a fourth year nursing student currently finishing my integrative practicum and final consolidation on the orthopaedic inpatient surgery floor at University Hospital in London, Ontario. I have had prior placements within this field of nursing and have been drawn towards orthopaedic placements due to my interest in sports medicine and the musculoskeletal system of the body. Through multiple orthopaedic placements I have witnessed first-hand the crippling effects of pain on patients, causing both physical and psychological distress. As a result I have encountered a multitude of different pain management control techniques ranging from pharmacological to non-pharmacological in nature. Through my experience on the orthopaedic inpatient surgery floor, I encountered the use of continuous infusion regional anesthetic catheters, commonly known as nerve block catheters. This innovative pain management technique yielded a plethora of different results for different patients, which sparked my interest into the relevant research and literature on their use. Pain management is one of the most important aspects of nursing care and the health care field as a whole, and it is my belief that healthcare practitioners must remain knowledgeable and educated on the latest techniques.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gray, S Vincent; Hill, Elizabeth;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    ACRL publication Databrarianship: The Academic Data Librarian in Theory and Practice can by purchased at the ALA store: http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11774

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wilkinson, Margaret Ann;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Over the past two decades, globalization, digitization, and the rise of the Internet have each contributed to a new prominence for intellectual property law in public policy debates around the world. Questions about how intellectual property is controlled, licensed, used, and reused are all part of a growing public discourse that now engages far more than an elite cadre of lawyers. Because intellectual property law now trenches so deeply on issues of economics, culture, health, commerce, creativity, and intellectual freedom, it is no surprise that there is also a burgeoning literature on intellectual property issues that comes, not just from legal academics or lawyers, but from those trained in other disciplines. In the spring of 2012, the Centre for Law, Technology, and Society at the University of Ottawa hosted a workshop that sought to bring together academics from different disciplines interested in intellectual property law in order to stimulate discussion across disciplines, to encourage the development of collaborative efforts, and to produce a body of research that explores intellectual property law issues from explicitly interdisciplinary perspectives. The collection of papers in this book is the product of this workshop.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gardiner, Rita A, Ph.D;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    In this chapter, I ask two interrelated questions. First, how do leaders judge what is a responsible course of action? Second, and relatedly, how do others judge what constitutes responsibility in leadership action? The core argument I put forward is that thinking with Hannah Arendt deepens our comprehension of what it might mean to lead responsibly. She encourages us to recognize that leading in a responsible manner is, above all, a judgment call. From an Arendtian perspective, to judge responsibly entails taking the time to reflect upon a decision so as to weigh up the different sides of an argument. Thus, a measured response requires a willingness to approach an issue from multiple perspectives, and to engage in the kind of reflective thinking that Donna Ladkin (2010) argues is critical to leadership.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marquis, Elizabeth;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada
  • Other research product . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cao, Daniel J;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Dr. Ali Khan is an assistant professor and scientist at the Robarts Research Institute at Western University. He completed his B. ASc. and Ph.D. in engineering science at Simon Fraser University, and afterwards received training as a postdoctoral fellow at Robarts. Dr. Khan and his lab group focus on the development of computational methods to enhance medical imaging processes, particularly those related to determining the role of the hippocampus in epilepsy. Daniel Cao, a member of the WURJ editorial review board, interviewed Dr. Khan about his career and aspirations.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Western University;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    As part of FLIP: Future Library In Progress, a process to shape the Western Libraries strategic plan, flip charts were positioned in libraries asking students to provide input and answer the question of the day, such as, “What can the library do to inspire you?” The makeover is just beginning for Western Libraries.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Simpson, Bonnie; Dunn, Lea; White, Katherine;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    This chapter examines the mirror image of the identity association principle: dissociation. While the association principle posits that stimuli associated with a positively regarded identity receive more positive evaluations, the dissociation principle suggests that stimuli associated with negatively regarded identities will receive negative evaluations and be abandoned. The authors focus on the nature of dissociative reference groups or groups that the consumer is motivated to avoid association with, and present a framework outlining how dissociative influence can impact consumer behavior. They review the literature on dissociative influence and note that although dissociative reference groups often spur avoidance behaviors, they can sometimes induce approach behaviors. They then turn to a discussion of how dissociative associations can lead to polarizing reactions in real-world domains, such as politics. Finally, they draw on their theorizing to outline some suggested directions for future research in this regard.

  • Other research product . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Xu, Ellen Y; Yip, Cheryl Y;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Dr. Derek McLachlin is an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry at Western University. He obtained his PhD at Western University for his work on the quatenary structure of E. coli ATP synthase. Dr. McLachlin did his post-doctoral studies at Rockefeller University in New York City, where he analyzed phosphorylated peptides from complex mixtures. Ellen Xu and Cheryl Yip had the chance to interview him to learn more about his research and his time as a professor at Western.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Solga, Kim;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    The October 2008 issue of Theatre Journal was bookended by articles from Jill Dolan and Dorothy Chansky that separately reevaluated two stalwarts of the second-wave feminist movement: Wendy Wasserstein (Dolan) and Betty Friedan (Chansky). Together, they marked one unofficial beginning of what has since become a vibrant contemporary movement (including my work with Roberta Barker in Canada, as well as work by Elaine Aston in the United Kingdom, and Varun Begley and Cary Mazer in the United States) to rethink, reframe, and reclaim stage realism in all of its fraught complexity. While it is impossible to recuperate stage realism naively, thanks to the robust critique leveled against it by feminist and critical race scholars over the past four decades, it is—as the above writers contend—nevertheless necessary to parse that critique with care, to distinguish among the multiple practices and strategies (dramaturgical, technical, and performative) that constitute the thing(s) we mean when we talk about “realism,” and to take the measure of the different kinds of cultural work that multiple “realisms” can do—sometimes separately, sometimes in tandem, and sometimes at tantalizing cross-purposes with one another.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
379 Research products, page 1 of 38
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Pantaleon Rodriguez, Ulises;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    My name is Ulises Pantaleon Rodriguez and I am a fourth year nursing student currently finishing my integrative practicum and final consolidation on the orthopaedic inpatient surgery floor at University Hospital in London, Ontario. I have had prior placements within this field of nursing and have been drawn towards orthopaedic placements due to my interest in sports medicine and the musculoskeletal system of the body. Through multiple orthopaedic placements I have witnessed first-hand the crippling effects of pain on patients, causing both physical and psychological distress. As a result I have encountered a multitude of different pain management control techniques ranging from pharmacological to non-pharmacological in nature. Through my experience on the orthopaedic inpatient surgery floor, I encountered the use of continuous infusion regional anesthetic catheters, commonly known as nerve block catheters. This innovative pain management technique yielded a plethora of different results for different patients, which sparked my interest into the relevant research and literature on their use. Pain management is one of the most important aspects of nursing care and the health care field as a whole, and it is my belief that healthcare practitioners must remain knowledgeable and educated on the latest techniques.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gray, S Vincent; Hill, Elizabeth;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    ACRL publication Databrarianship: The Academic Data Librarian in Theory and Practice can by purchased at the ALA store: http://www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=11774

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Wilkinson, Margaret Ann;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Over the past two decades, globalization, digitization, and the rise of the Internet have each contributed to a new prominence for intellectual property law in public policy debates around the world. Questions about how intellectual property is controlled, licensed, used, and reused are all part of a growing public discourse that now engages far more than an elite cadre of lawyers. Because intellectual property law now trenches so deeply on issues of economics, culture, health, commerce, creativity, and intellectual freedom, it is no surprise that there is also a burgeoning literature on intellectual property issues that comes, not just from legal academics or lawyers, but from those trained in other disciplines. In the spring of 2012, the Centre for Law, Technology, and Society at the University of Ottawa hosted a workshop that sought to bring together academics from different disciplines interested in intellectual property law in order to stimulate discussion across disciplines, to encourage the development of collaborative efforts, and to produce a body of research that explores intellectual property law issues from explicitly interdisciplinary perspectives. The collection of papers in this book is the product of this workshop.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Gardiner, Rita A, Ph.D;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    In this chapter, I ask two interrelated questions. First, how do leaders judge what is a responsible course of action? Second, and relatedly, how do others judge what constitutes responsibility in leadership action? The core argument I put forward is that thinking with Hannah Arendt deepens our comprehension of what it might mean to lead responsibly. She encourages us to recognize that leading in a responsible manner is, above all, a judgment call. From an Arendtian perspective, to judge responsibly entails taking the time to reflect upon a decision so as to weigh up the different sides of an argument. Thus, a measured response requires a willingness to approach an issue from multiple perspectives, and to engage in the kind of reflective thinking that Donna Ladkin (2010) argues is critical to leadership.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Marquis, Elizabeth;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada
  • Other research product . 2018
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Cao, Daniel J;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Dr. Ali Khan is an assistant professor and scientist at the Robarts Research Institute at Western University. He completed his B. ASc. and Ph.D. in engineering science at Simon Fraser University, and afterwards received training as a postdoctoral fellow at Robarts. Dr. Khan and his lab group focus on the development of computational methods to enhance medical imaging processes, particularly those related to determining the role of the hippocampus in epilepsy. Daniel Cao, a member of the WURJ editorial review board, interviewed Dr. Khan about his career and aspirations.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Western University;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    As part of FLIP: Future Library In Progress, a process to shape the Western Libraries strategic plan, flip charts were positioned in libraries asking students to provide input and answer the question of the day, such as, “What can the library do to inspire you?” The makeover is just beginning for Western Libraries.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Simpson, Bonnie; Dunn, Lea; White, Katherine;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    This chapter examines the mirror image of the identity association principle: dissociation. While the association principle posits that stimuli associated with a positively regarded identity receive more positive evaluations, the dissociation principle suggests that stimuli associated with negatively regarded identities will receive negative evaluations and be abandoned. The authors focus on the nature of dissociative reference groups or groups that the consumer is motivated to avoid association with, and present a framework outlining how dissociative influence can impact consumer behavior. They review the literature on dissociative influence and note that although dissociative reference groups often spur avoidance behaviors, they can sometimes induce approach behaviors. They then turn to a discussion of how dissociative associations can lead to polarizing reactions in real-world domains, such as politics. Finally, they draw on their theorizing to outline some suggested directions for future research in this regard.

  • Other research product . 2013
    Open Access
    Authors: 
    Xu, Ellen Y; Yip, Cheryl Y;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    Dr. Derek McLachlin is an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry at Western University. He obtained his PhD at Western University for his work on the quatenary structure of E. coli ATP synthase. Dr. McLachlin did his post-doctoral studies at Rockefeller University in New York City, where he analyzed phosphorylated peptides from complex mixtures. Ellen Xu and Cheryl Yip had the chance to interview him to learn more about his research and his time as a professor at Western.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Solga, Kim;
    Publisher: Scholarship@Western
    Country: Canada

    The October 2008 issue of Theatre Journal was bookended by articles from Jill Dolan and Dorothy Chansky that separately reevaluated two stalwarts of the second-wave feminist movement: Wendy Wasserstein (Dolan) and Betty Friedan (Chansky). Together, they marked one unofficial beginning of what has since become a vibrant contemporary movement (including my work with Roberta Barker in Canada, as well as work by Elaine Aston in the United Kingdom, and Varun Begley and Cary Mazer in the United States) to rethink, reframe, and reclaim stage realism in all of its fraught complexity. While it is impossible to recuperate stage realism naively, thanks to the robust critique leveled against it by feminist and critical race scholars over the past four decades, it is—as the above writers contend—nevertheless necessary to parse that critique with care, to distinguish among the multiple practices and strategies (dramaturgical, technical, and performative) that constitute the thing(s) we mean when we talk about “realism,” and to take the measure of the different kinds of cultural work that multiple “realisms” can do—sometimes separately, sometimes in tandem, and sometimes at tantalizing cross-purposes with one another.