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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lars Kober; Manuel Martinez-Selles; Salim Yusuf; Antoni Bayes-Genis; Kim Krogsgaard; Olav Wendelboe Nielsen; Aldo Pietro Maggioni; Finlay McAlister; Carlos Fernandez-Palomeque; Albert Gabarrús; +10 more
    Country: Australia

    Aims Treatment of patients with heart failure (HF) relies on measurement of LVEF. However, the extent to which EF is recorded varies markedly. We sought to characterize the patient group that is missing a measure of EF, and to explore the association between missing EF and outcome. Methods and results Individual data on 30 445 patients from 28 observational studies in the Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure (MAGGIC) project were used to compare the prevalence of co-morbidities and outcome across three groups of HF patients: those with missing EF (HF-mEF), reduced EF (HF-REF), and preserved EF (HF-PEF). A total of 29% had HF-mEF, 52% HF-REF, and 19% HF-PEF. Compared with patients in whom EF was known, patients with HF-mEF were older, had a greater prevalence of COPD and previous stroke, and were smokers. Patients with HF-mEF were less likely to receive evidence-based treatment than those with HF-REF. Adjusted mortality in HF-mEF was similar to that in HF-REF and greater than that in HF-PEF at 3 years [HF-REF, hazard ratio (HR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95–1.12); HF-PEF, HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.71–0.86]. Conclusion Missing EF is common. The short- and long-term outcome of patients with HF-mEF is poor and they exhibit different co-morbidity profiles and treatment patterns compared with patients with known EF. HF patients with missing EF represent a high risk group.

  • Authors: 
    Masen Lamb; Andrew Norton; Bruce Macintosh; Carlos Correia; Jean-Pierre Véran; Christian Marois; Suresh Sivanandam;
    Publisher: SPIE

    We explore the application of phase diversity to calibrate the non common path aberrations (NCPA) in the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). This is first investigated in simulation in order to characterize the ideal technique parameters with simulated GPI calibration source data. The best working simulation parameters are derived and we establish the algorithm's capability to recover an injected astigmatism. Furthermore, the real data appear to exhibit signs of de-centering between the in and out of focus images that are required by phase diversity; this effect can arise when the diverse images are acquired in closed loop and are close to the non-linear regime of the wavefront sensor. We show in simulation that this effect can inhibit our algorithm, which does not take into account the impact of de-centering between images. To mitigate this effect, we validate the technique of using a single diverse image with our algorithm; this is first demonstrated in simulation and then applied to the real GPI data. Following this approach, we find that we can successfully recover a known astigmatism injection using the real GPI data and subsequently apply an NCPA correction to GPI (in the format of offset reference slopes) to improve the relative Strehl ratio by 5%; we note this NCPA correction application is rudimentary and a more thorough application will be investigated in the near future. Finally, the estimated NCPA in the form of astigmatism and coma agree well with the magnitude of the same modes reported by Poyneer et al. 2016.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Oliver Plümper; Andreas Beinlich; Wolfgang Bach; Emilie Janots; Håkon Austrheim;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Geochemical micro-environments within serpentinizing systems can abiotically synthesize hydrocarbons and provide the ingredients required to support life. Observations of organic matter in microgeode-like hydrogarnets found in Mid-Atlantic Ridge serpentinites suggest these garnets possibly represent unique nests for the colonization of microbial ecosystems within the oceanic lithosphere. However, little is known about the mineralogical and geochemical processes that allow such unique environments to form. Here we present work on outcrop-scale vein networks from an ultramafic massif in Norway that contain massive amounts of spherulitic garnets (andradite), which help to constrain such processes. Vein andradite spherulites are associated with polyhedral serpentine, brucite, Ni–Fe alloy (awaruite), and magnetite indicative of low temperature (<200 °C) alteration under low fO2 and low aSiO2,aq geochemical conditions. Together with the outcrop- and micro-scale analysis geochemical reaction path modeling shows that there was limited mass transport and fluid flow over a large scale. Once opened the veins remained isolated (closed system), forming non-equilibrium microenvironments that allowed, upon a threshold supersaturation, the rapid crystallization (seconds to weeks) of spherulitic andradite. The presence of polyhedral serpentine spheres indicates that veins were initially filled with a gel-like protoserpentine phase. In addition, massive Fe oxidation associated with andradite formation could have generated as much as 600 mmol H2,aq per 100 cm3 vein. Although no carboneous matter was detected, the vein networks fulfill the reported geochemical criteria required to generate abiogenic hydrocarbons and support microbial communities. Thus, systems similar to those investigated here are of prime interest when searching for life-supporting environments within the deep subsurface.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bentham, James; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Zhou, Bin; Bixby, Honor; Cowan, Melanie J.; Fortunato, Lea; Bennett, James E.; Danaei, Goodarz; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; +263 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Sweden, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Finland, Peru, Poland, Malta, Germany ...
    Project: WT | A Global Database on Card... (101506), WT , EC | HYPERGENES (201550)

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. http://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed published version Article

  • Authors: 
    Gillian Brock; Hamish Russell;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Professionals and professional firms provide a range of taxation-related services, from advising clients on their tax obligations to designing and implementing tax-reduction strategies. Provided that tax professionals respect the letter of the law, are all such tax services morally permissible? We answer this question in the negative by distinguishing between institutional integrity and institutional corruption in fiscal arrangements; tax services that promote a situation of fiscal institutional corruption are impermissible, given that they severely inhibit the ability of taxation institutions to collect revenue efficiently and equitably. The professional facilitation of abusive tax avoidance — explicit tax reduction that is contrary to the spirit or intent of the law — is a particularly prominent aspect of fiscal institutional corruption. We illustrate the role of professionals in designing, promoting and implementing abusive tax avoidance strategies through several case studies, including the Wyly offshore network and the KPMG tax shelter scandal. In addition, we claim that tax professionals have specific responsibilities to help remedy institutional corruption associated with abusive tax avoidance. To argue this thesis, we present general principles for assigning remedial responsibilities to particular agents. We then apply those principles to determine what three major groups of tax professionals — accountants, lawyers, and financial experts — ought to do about abusive tax avoidance.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Karoline Kuchenbaecker; Kyriaki Michailidou; Gustavo Mendoza-Fandiño; Janna Lilyquist; Curtis Olswold; Emily Hallberg; Habibul Ahsan; Kristiina Aittomäki; Irene L. Andrulis; Hoda Anton-Culver; +198 more
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands, Spain, United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Spain ...
    Project: CIHR , NIH | Elucidating Loci Involved... (5U19CA148537-02), EC | COGS (223175), NWO | Secure and gentle grip of... (11477), NIH | Follow-up of Ovarian Canc... (3U19CA148112-04S1), NIH | A genome-wide association... (5R01CA128978-02), WT , NIH | Discovery Expansion and R... (5U19CA148065-04)

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. B.C.A.C. was funded through a European Community Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no 223175 (HEALTH-F2-2009-223175; COGS); Cancer Research UK (C1287/A10118, C1287/A10710, C12292/A11174, C1281/A12014, C5047/A8384, C5047/A15007, C5047/A10692); the National Institutes of Health Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Breast Cancer (CA116201), R01 grants (CA128978, CA176785, CA192393), and Post-Cancer GWAS initiative (1U19 CA148537, 1U19 CA148065 and 1U19 CA148112 - the GAME-ON initiative); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for the CIHR Team in Familial Risks of Breast Cancer, the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation, and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. CIMBA genotyping was supported by National Institutes of Health grant (CA128978); the Department of Defence (W81XWH-10-1-0341); and the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation. CIMBA data management and data analysis were supported by Cancer Research UK grants C12292/A11174 and C1287/A10118. This study made use of data generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control consortium. Functional studies were supported by the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation. A full description of funding and acknowledgments is provided in Supplementary Note 1.

  • Authors: 
    Romain Lebreton; Esmaeil Mehrabi; Éric Schost;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mark Haas; Alexandre Loupy; Carmen Lefaucheur; Candice Roufosse; Denis Glotz; Daniel Serón; Brian J. Nankivell; Philip F. Halloran; Robert B. Colvin; Enver Akalin; +19 more
    Countries: Spain, United States, United Kingdom

    The kidney sessions of the 2017 Banff Conference focused on 2 areas: clinical implications of inflammation in areas of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (i‐IFTA) and its relationship to T cell–mediated rejection (TCMR), and the continued evolution of molecular diagnostics, particularly in the diagnosis of antibody‐mediated rejection (ABMR). In confirmation of previous studies, it was independently demonstrated by 2 groups that i‐IFTA is associated with reduced graft survival. Furthermore, these groups presented that i‐IFTA, particularly when involving >25% of sclerotic cortex in association with tubulitis, is often a sequela of acute TCMR in association with underimmunosuppression. The classification was thus revised to include moderate i‐IFTA plus moderate or severe tubulitis as diagnostic of chronic active TCMR. Other studies demonstrated that certain molecular classifiers improve diagnosis of ABMR beyond what is possible with histology, C4d, and detection of donor‐specific antibodies (DSAs) and that both C4d and validated molecular assays can serve as potential alternatives and/or complements to DSAs in the diagnosis of ABMR. The Banff ABMR criteria are thus updated to include these alternatives. Finally, the present report paves the way for the Banff scheme to be part of an integrative approach for defining surrogate endpoints in next‐generation clinical trials. The Banff consortium presents revisions to the diagnostic criteria for T cell– and antibody‐mediated kidney transplant rejection, including specific criteria for chronic active T cell–mediated rejection, plus prospects for integrative endpoints in clinical trials. See related articles on pages 321, 364, and 377.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jonathan S. Hausmann; Paul Sufka; Suleman Bhana; Jean W. Liew; Pedro Machado; Zachary S. Wallace; Wendy Costello; Philip Robinson; Jinoos Yazdany; Rebecca Grainger; +1 more
    Publisher: AVES Yayincilik
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Darren Mylotte; Arnaud Sudre; Emmanuel Teiger; Jean-François Obadia; Marcus Lee; Mark S. Spence; Hazem Khamis; Arif Al Nooryani; Cedric Delhaye; Gilles Amr; +4 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Ireland

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of transcarotid transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Background Many candidates for TAVR have challenging vascular anatomy that precludes transfemoral access. Transcarotid arterial access may be an option for such patients. Methods The French Transcarotid TAVR Registry is a voluntary database that prospectively collected patient demographics, procedural characteristics, and clinical outcomes among patients undergoing transcarotid TAVR. Outcomes are reported according to the updated Valve Academic Research Consortium criteria. Results Among 96 patients undergoing transcarotid TAVR at 3 French sites (2009 to 2013), the mean age and Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality were 79.4 ± 9.2 years and 7.1 ± 4.1%, respectively. Successful carotid artery access was achieved in all patients. The Medtronic CoreValve (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota) (n = 89; 92.7%) and Edwards SAPIEN valves (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) (n = 7; 7.3%) were used. Procedural complications included: valve embolization (3.1%), requirement for a second valve (3.1%), and tamponade (4.2%). There were no major bleeds or major vascular complications related to the access site. There were 3 (3.1%) procedural deaths and 6 (6.3%) deaths at 30 days. The 1-year mortality rate was 16.7%. There were 3 (3.1%) cases of Valve Academic Research Consortium–defined in-hospital stroke (n = 0) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) (n = 3). None of these patients achieved the criteria for stroke and none manifested new ischemic lesions on cerebral computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. At 30 days, a further 3 TIAs were observed, giving an overall stroke/TIA rate of 6.3%. Conclusions Transcarotid vascular access for TAVR is feasible and is associated with encouraging short- and medium-term clinical outcomes. Prospective studies are required to ascertain if transcarotid TAVR yields equivalent results to other nonfemoral vascular access routes.

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
53,113 Research products, page 1 of 5,312
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lars Kober; Manuel Martinez-Selles; Salim Yusuf; Antoni Bayes-Genis; Kim Krogsgaard; Olav Wendelboe Nielsen; Aldo Pietro Maggioni; Finlay McAlister; Carlos Fernandez-Palomeque; Albert Gabarrús; +10 more
    Country: Australia

    Aims Treatment of patients with heart failure (HF) relies on measurement of LVEF. However, the extent to which EF is recorded varies markedly. We sought to characterize the patient group that is missing a measure of EF, and to explore the association between missing EF and outcome. Methods and results Individual data on 30 445 patients from 28 observational studies in the Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure (MAGGIC) project were used to compare the prevalence of co-morbidities and outcome across three groups of HF patients: those with missing EF (HF-mEF), reduced EF (HF-REF), and preserved EF (HF-PEF). A total of 29% had HF-mEF, 52% HF-REF, and 19% HF-PEF. Compared with patients in whom EF was known, patients with HF-mEF were older, had a greater prevalence of COPD and previous stroke, and were smokers. Patients with HF-mEF were less likely to receive evidence-based treatment than those with HF-REF. Adjusted mortality in HF-mEF was similar to that in HF-REF and greater than that in HF-PEF at 3 years [HF-REF, hazard ratio (HR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95–1.12); HF-PEF, HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.71–0.86]. Conclusion Missing EF is common. The short- and long-term outcome of patients with HF-mEF is poor and they exhibit different co-morbidity profiles and treatment patterns compared with patients with known EF. HF patients with missing EF represent a high risk group.

  • Authors: 
    Masen Lamb; Andrew Norton; Bruce Macintosh; Carlos Correia; Jean-Pierre Véran; Christian Marois; Suresh Sivanandam;
    Publisher: SPIE

    We explore the application of phase diversity to calibrate the non common path aberrations (NCPA) in the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). This is first investigated in simulation in order to characterize the ideal technique parameters with simulated GPI calibration source data. The best working simulation parameters are derived and we establish the algorithm's capability to recover an injected astigmatism. Furthermore, the real data appear to exhibit signs of de-centering between the in and out of focus images that are required by phase diversity; this effect can arise when the diverse images are acquired in closed loop and are close to the non-linear regime of the wavefront sensor. We show in simulation that this effect can inhibit our algorithm, which does not take into account the impact of de-centering between images. To mitigate this effect, we validate the technique of using a single diverse image with our algorithm; this is first demonstrated in simulation and then applied to the real GPI data. Following this approach, we find that we can successfully recover a known astigmatism injection using the real GPI data and subsequently apply an NCPA correction to GPI (in the format of offset reference slopes) to improve the relative Strehl ratio by 5%; we note this NCPA correction application is rudimentary and a more thorough application will be investigated in the near future. Finally, the estimated NCPA in the form of astigmatism and coma agree well with the magnitude of the same modes reported by Poyneer et al. 2016.

  • Closed Access
    Authors: 
    Oliver Plümper; Andreas Beinlich; Wolfgang Bach; Emilie Janots; Håkon Austrheim;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Geochemical micro-environments within serpentinizing systems can abiotically synthesize hydrocarbons and provide the ingredients required to support life. Observations of organic matter in microgeode-like hydrogarnets found in Mid-Atlantic Ridge serpentinites suggest these garnets possibly represent unique nests for the colonization of microbial ecosystems within the oceanic lithosphere. However, little is known about the mineralogical and geochemical processes that allow such unique environments to form. Here we present work on outcrop-scale vein networks from an ultramafic massif in Norway that contain massive amounts of spherulitic garnets (andradite), which help to constrain such processes. Vein andradite spherulites are associated with polyhedral serpentine, brucite, Ni–Fe alloy (awaruite), and magnetite indicative of low temperature (<200 °C) alteration under low fO2 and low aSiO2,aq geochemical conditions. Together with the outcrop- and micro-scale analysis geochemical reaction path modeling shows that there was limited mass transport and fluid flow over a large scale. Once opened the veins remained isolated (closed system), forming non-equilibrium microenvironments that allowed, upon a threshold supersaturation, the rapid crystallization (seconds to weeks) of spherulitic andradite. The presence of polyhedral serpentine spheres indicates that veins were initially filled with a gel-like protoserpentine phase. In addition, massive Fe oxidation associated with andradite formation could have generated as much as 600 mmol H2,aq per 100 cm3 vein. Although no carboneous matter was detected, the vein networks fulfill the reported geochemical criteria required to generate abiogenic hydrocarbons and support microbial communities. Thus, systems similar to those investigated here are of prime interest when searching for life-supporting environments within the deep subsurface.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bentham, James; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Zhou, Bin; Bixby, Honor; Cowan, Melanie J.; Fortunato, Lea; Bennett, James E.; Danaei, Goodarz; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; +263 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Sweden, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Finland, Peru, Poland, Malta, Germany ...
    Project: WT | A Global Database on Card... (101506), WT , EC | HYPERGENES (201550)

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. http://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed published version Article

  • Authors: 
    Gillian Brock; Hamish Russell;
    Publisher: Elsevier BV

    Professionals and professional firms provide a range of taxation-related services, from advising clients on their tax obligations to designing and implementing tax-reduction strategies. Provided that tax professionals respect the letter of the law, are all such tax services morally permissible? We answer this question in the negative by distinguishing between institutional integrity and institutional corruption in fiscal arrangements; tax services that promote a situation of fiscal institutional corruption are impermissible, given that they severely inhibit the ability of taxation institutions to collect revenue efficiently and equitably. The professional facilitation of abusive tax avoidance — explicit tax reduction that is contrary to the spirit or intent of the law — is a particularly prominent aspect of fiscal institutional corruption. We illustrate the role of professionals in designing, promoting and implementing abusive tax avoidance strategies through several case studies, including the Wyly offshore network and the KPMG tax shelter scandal. In addition, we claim that tax professionals have specific responsibilities to help remedy institutional corruption associated with abusive tax avoidance. To argue this thesis, we present general principles for assigning remedial responsibilities to particular agents. We then apply those principles to determine what three major groups of tax professionals — accountants, lawyers, and financial experts — ought to do about abusive tax avoidance.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Karoline Kuchenbaecker; Kyriaki Michailidou; Gustavo Mendoza-Fandiño; Janna Lilyquist; Curtis Olswold; Emily Hallberg; Habibul Ahsan; Kristiina Aittomäki; Irene L. Andrulis; Hoda Anton-Culver; +198 more
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands, Spain, United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Spain ...
    Project: CIHR , NIH | Elucidating Loci Involved... (5U19CA148537-02), EC | COGS (223175), NWO | Secure and gentle grip of... (11477), NIH | Follow-up of Ovarian Canc... (3U19CA148112-04S1), NIH | A genome-wide association... (5R01CA128978-02), WT , NIH | Discovery Expansion and R... (5U19CA148065-04)

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. B.C.A.C. was funded through a European Community Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no 223175 (HEALTH-F2-2009-223175; COGS); Cancer Research UK (C1287/A10118, C1287/A10710, C12292/A11174, C1281/A12014, C5047/A8384, C5047/A15007, C5047/A10692); the National Institutes of Health Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Breast Cancer (CA116201), R01 grants (CA128978, CA176785, CA192393), and Post-Cancer GWAS initiative (1U19 CA148537, 1U19 CA148065 and 1U19 CA148112 - the GAME-ON initiative); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for the CIHR Team in Familial Risks of Breast Cancer, the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation, and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. CIMBA genotyping was supported by National Institutes of Health grant (CA128978); the Department of Defence (W81XWH-10-1-0341); and the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation. CIMBA data management and data analysis were supported by Cancer Research UK grants C12292/A11174 and C1287/A10118. This study made use of data generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control consortium. Functional studies were supported by the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation. A full description of funding and acknowledgments is provided in Supplementary Note 1.

  • Authors: 
    Romain Lebreton; Esmaeil Mehrabi; Éric Schost;
    Publisher: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Mark Haas; Alexandre Loupy; Carmen Lefaucheur; Candice Roufosse; Denis Glotz; Daniel Serón; Brian J. Nankivell; Philip F. Halloran; Robert B. Colvin; Enver Akalin; +19 more
    Countries: Spain, United States, United Kingdom

    The kidney sessions of the 2017 Banff Conference focused on 2 areas: clinical implications of inflammation in areas of interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy (i‐IFTA) and its relationship to T cell–mediated rejection (TCMR), and the continued evolution of molecular diagnostics, particularly in the diagnosis of antibody‐mediated rejection (ABMR). In confirmation of previous studies, it was independently demonstrated by 2 groups that i‐IFTA is associated with reduced graft survival. Furthermore, these groups presented that i‐IFTA, particularly when involving >25% of sclerotic cortex in association with tubulitis, is often a sequela of acute TCMR in association with underimmunosuppression. The classification was thus revised to include moderate i‐IFTA plus moderate or severe tubulitis as diagnostic of chronic active TCMR. Other studies demonstrated that certain molecular classifiers improve diagnosis of ABMR beyond what is possible with histology, C4d, and detection of donor‐specific antibodies (DSAs) and that both C4d and validated molecular assays can serve as potential alternatives and/or complements to DSAs in the diagnosis of ABMR. The Banff ABMR criteria are thus updated to include these alternatives. Finally, the present report paves the way for the Banff scheme to be part of an integrative approach for defining surrogate endpoints in next‐generation clinical trials. The Banff consortium presents revisions to the diagnostic criteria for T cell– and antibody‐mediated kidney transplant rejection, including specific criteria for chronic active T cell–mediated rejection, plus prospects for integrative endpoints in clinical trials. See related articles on pages 321, 364, and 377.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2020
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jonathan S. Hausmann; Paul Sufka; Suleman Bhana; Jean W. Liew; Pedro Machado; Zachary S. Wallace; Wendy Costello; Philip Robinson; Jinoos Yazdany; Rebecca Grainger; +1 more
    Publisher: AVES Yayincilik
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Darren Mylotte; Arnaud Sudre; Emmanuel Teiger; Jean-François Obadia; Marcus Lee; Mark S. Spence; Hazem Khamis; Arif Al Nooryani; Cedric Delhaye; Gilles Amr; +4 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Country: Ireland

    Abstract Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of transcarotid transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Background Many candidates for TAVR have challenging vascular anatomy that precludes transfemoral access. Transcarotid arterial access may be an option for such patients. Methods The French Transcarotid TAVR Registry is a voluntary database that prospectively collected patient demographics, procedural characteristics, and clinical outcomes among patients undergoing transcarotid TAVR. Outcomes are reported according to the updated Valve Academic Research Consortium criteria. Results Among 96 patients undergoing transcarotid TAVR at 3 French sites (2009 to 2013), the mean age and Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk of mortality were 79.4 ± 9.2 years and 7.1 ± 4.1%, respectively. Successful carotid artery access was achieved in all patients. The Medtronic CoreValve (Medtronic, Inc., Minneapolis, Minnesota) (n = 89; 92.7%) and Edwards SAPIEN valves (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, California) (n = 7; 7.3%) were used. Procedural complications included: valve embolization (3.1%), requirement for a second valve (3.1%), and tamponade (4.2%). There were no major bleeds or major vascular complications related to the access site. There were 3 (3.1%) procedural deaths and 6 (6.3%) deaths at 30 days. The 1-year mortality rate was 16.7%. There were 3 (3.1%) cases of Valve Academic Research Consortium–defined in-hospital stroke (n = 0) or transient ischemic attack (TIA) (n = 3). None of these patients achieved the criteria for stroke and none manifested new ischemic lesions on cerebral computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. At 30 days, a further 3 TIAs were observed, giving an overall stroke/TIA rate of 6.3%. Conclusions Transcarotid vascular access for TAVR is feasible and is associated with encouraging short- and medium-term clinical outcomes. Prospective studies are required to ascertain if transcarotid TAVR yields equivalent results to other nonfemoral vascular access routes.