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  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    R. Thomas Lumbers; Sonia Shah; Honghuang Lin; Tomasz Czuba; Albert Henry; Daniel I. Swerdlow; Anders Mälarstig; Niek Verweij; Michael V. Holmes; Johan Ärnlöv; +157 more
    Countries: Netherlands, France, Sweden, Denmark, United Kingdom, France, Denmark, United Kingdom, Sweden, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | BigData Heart (116074), EC | inHForm (679242)

    Funder: Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100004063 Funder: Swedish National Health Service Funder: Skåne University Hospital; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100011077 Funder: Crafoord Foundation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003173 Funder: Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100008748 Funder: Evans Medical Foundation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100015927 Funder: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000050 Funder: British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Biomedicine Funder: NIHR UCLH Biomedical Research Centre; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100012317 Abstract: Aims: The HERMES (HEart failure Molecular Epidemiology for Therapeutic targetS) consortium aims to identify the genomic and molecular basis of heart failure. Methods and results: The consortium currently includes 51 studies from 11 countries, including 68 157 heart failure cases and 949 888 controls, with data on heart failure events and prognosis. All studies collected biological samples and performed genome‐wide genotyping of common genetic variants. The enrolment of subjects into participating studies ranged from 1948 to the present day, and the median follow‐up following heart failure diagnosis ranged from 2 to 116 months. Forty‐nine of 51 individual studies enrolled participants of both sexes; in these studies, participants with heart failure were predominantly male (34–90%). The mean age at diagnosis or ascertainment across all studies ranged from 54 to 84 years. Based on the aggregate sample, we estimated 80% power to genetic variant associations with risk of heart failure with an odds ratio of ≥1.10 for common variants (allele frequency ≥ 0.05) and ≥1.20 for low‐frequency variants (allele frequency 0.01–0.05) at P < 5 × 10−8 under an additive genetic model. Conclusions: HERMES is a global collaboration aiming to (i) identify the genetic determinants of heart failure; (ii) generate insights into the causal pathways leading to heart failure and enable genetic approaches to target prioritization; and (iii) develop genomic tools for disease stratification and risk prediction.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rovin, B.H.; Adler, S.G.; Barratt, J.; Bridoux, F.; Burdge, K.A.; Chan, T.M.; Cook, H.T.; Fervenza, F.C.; Gibson, K.L.; Glassock, R.J.; +26 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Countries: United Kingdom, Netherlands

    The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Glomerular Diseases is an update to the KDIGO 2012 guideline. The aim is to assist clinicians caring for individuals with glomerulonephritis (GN), both adults and children. The scope includes various glomerular diseases, including IgA nephropathy and IgA vasculitis, membranous nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), infection-related GN, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis, lupus nephritis, and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody GN. In addition, this guideline will be the first to address the subtype of complement-mediated diseases. Each chapter follows the same format providing guidance related to diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and special situations. The goal of the guideline is to generate a useful resource for clinicians and patients by providing actionable recommendations based on evidence syntheses, with useful infographics incorporating views from experts in the field. Another aim is to propose research recommendations for areas where there are gaps in knowledge. The guideline targets a broad global audience of clinicians treating GN while being mindful of implications for policy and cost. Development of this guideline update followed an explicit process whereby treatment approaches and guideline recommendations are based on systematic reviews of relevant studies, and appraisal of the quality of the evidence and the strength of recommendations followed the "Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation" (GRADE) approach. Limitations of the evidence are discussed, with areas of future research also presented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annabelle Haudry; Adrian E. Platts; Emilio Vello; Douglas R. Hoen; Mickael Leclercq; Robert J. Williamson; Ewa Forczek; Zoé Joly-Lopez; Joshua G. Steffen; Khaled M. Hazzouri; +19 more
    Countries: France, Netherlands, France
    Project: NSF | 2010 Project: Arabidopsis... (0929262)

    Despite the central importance of noncoding DNA to gene regulation and evolution, understanding of the extent of selection on plant noncoding DNA remains limited compared to that of other organisms. Here we report sequencing of genomes from three Brassicaceae species (Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and Aethionema arabicum) and their joint analysis with six previously sequenced crucifer genomes. Conservation across orthologous bases suggests that at least 17% of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome is under selection, with nearly one-quarter of the sequence under selection lying outside of coding regions. Much of this sequence can be localized to approximately 90,000 conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) that show evidence of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Population genomics analyses of two crucifer species, A. thaliana and Capsella grandiflora, confirm that most of the identified CNSs are evolving under medium to strong purifying selection. Overall, these CNSs highlight both similarities and several key differences between the regulatory DNA of plants and other species.

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; +197 more
    Countries: Italy, Germany, Turkey, Italy, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, United Kingdom, United Kingdom ...

    The performance of the jet trigger for the ATLAS detector at the LHC during the 2011 data taking period is described. During 2011 the LHC provided proton-proton collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and heavy ion collisions with a 2.76 TeV per nucleon-nucleon collision energy. The ATLAS trigger is a three level system designed to reduce the rate of events from the 40 MHz nominal maximum bunch crossing rate to the approximate 400 Hz which can be written to offline storage. The ATLAS jet trigger is the primary means for the online selection of events containing jets. Events are accepted by the trigger if they contain one or more jets above some transverse energy threshold. During 2011 data taking the jet trigger was fully efficient for jets with transverse energy above 25 GeV for triggers seeded randomly at Level 1. For triggers which require a jet to be identified at each of the three trigger levels, full efficiency is reached for offline jets with transverse energy above 60 GeV. Jets reconstructed in the Event Filter and corresponding to offline jets with transverse energy greater than 60 GeV, are reconstructed with a resolution in transverse energy of better than 4% in the central region and better than 2.5% in the forward direction. 51 pages plus author list (68 pages total), 29 figures, 4 tables, published version, all figures are available at https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/TRIG-2012-01/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jeroen R. Huyghe; Stephanie A. Bien; Tabitha A. Harrison; Hyun Min Kang; Sai Chen; Stephanie L. Schmit; David V. Conti; Conghui Qu; Jihyoun Jeon; Christopher K. Edlund; +176 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain, France, United Kingdom, Netherlands, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, Italy
    Project: WT

    To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P<5×10−8, bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to approximately 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Krüppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs, somatic drivers, and support a role of immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of underlying biology, and impact personalized screening strategies and drug development. Reporting Summary. Further information on experimental design is available in the Life Sciences Reporting Summary linked to this article.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bentham, James; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Zhou, Bin; Bixby, Honor; Cowan, Melanie J.; Fortunato, Lea; Bennett, James E.; Danaei, Goodarz; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; +262 more
    Countries: Croatia, United Kingdom, Belgium, Cyprus, Poland, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom ...
    Project: EC | HYPERGENES (201550), WT , WT | A Global Database on Card... (101506)

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. http://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed published version Article

  • Publication . Conference object . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kong Aik Lee; Anthony Larcher; Guangsen Wang; Patrick Kenny; Niko Brümmer; David A. van Leeuwen; Hagai Aronowitz; Marcel Kockmann; Carlos Vaquero; Bin Ma; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; This paper describes data collection efforts conducted as part of the RedDots project which is dedicated to the study of speaker recognition under conditions where test utterances are of short duration and of variable phonetic content. At the current stage, we focus on English speakers, both native and non-native, recruited worldwide. This is made possible through the use of a recording front-end consisting of an application running on mobile devices communicating with a centralized web server at the back-end. Speech recordings are collected by having speakers read text prompts displayed on the screen of the mobile devices. We aim to collect a large number of sessions from each speaker over a long time span, typically one session per week over a one year period. The corpus is expected to include rich inter-speaker and intra-speaker variations, both intrinsic and extrinsic (that is, due to recording channel and acoustic environment).

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . Preprint . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    V.M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B.S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; M. Agelou; E. Aguilo; S.H. Ahn; M. Ahsan; +190 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, France, United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, France, France, France
    Project: NSERC

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel based on approximately 370/pb of data collected by the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We employ two different methods to extract the top quark mass. We show that both methods yield consistent results using ensemble tests of events generated with the D0 Monte Carlo simulation. We combine the results from the two methods to obtain a top quark mass m_t = 178.1 +/- 8.2 GeV. The statistical uncertainty is 6.7 GeV and the systematic uncertainty is 4.8 GeV. Comment: 7 pages, 2 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    J.-M. Legay;
    Publisher: BioMed Central

    International audience

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    V. M. Abazov; Brad Abbott; Todd Adams; G. Alkhazov; George Alverson; Gilvan Alves; L. S. Ancu; M. Arov; Andrew Askew; J. Backusmayes; +204 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United Kingdom, France

    correlation, assuming that the spin of the top quark is either correlated with the spin of the anti-top quark as predicted by the standard model or is uncorrelated. For the first time we use a matrix-element-based approach to study ttbar spin correlation. We use {ttbar -> W+bW-bbar ->l+nubl-nub} final states produced in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV, where l denotes an electron or a muon. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 and were collected with the dzero detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The result agrees with the standard model prediction. We exclude the hypothesis that the spins of the ttbar are uncorrelated at the 97.7% C.L. 7 pages, 3 figures, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett

search
Include:
The following results are related to Canada. Are you interested to view more results? Visit OpenAIRE - Explore.
780 Research products, page 1 of 78
  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    R. Thomas Lumbers; Sonia Shah; Honghuang Lin; Tomasz Czuba; Albert Henry; Daniel I. Swerdlow; Anders Mälarstig; Niek Verweij; Michael V. Holmes; Johan Ärnlöv; +157 more
    Countries: Netherlands, France, Sweden, Denmark, United Kingdom, France, Denmark, United Kingdom, Sweden, United Kingdom
    Project: EC | BigData Heart (116074), EC | inHForm (679242)

    Funder: Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100004063 Funder: Swedish National Health Service Funder: Skåne University Hospital; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100011077 Funder: Crafoord Foundation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100003173 Funder: Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100008748 Funder: Evans Medical Foundation; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100015927 Funder: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000050 Funder: British Heart Foundation Cardiovascular Biomedicine Funder: NIHR UCLH Biomedical Research Centre; Id: http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/501100012317 Abstract: Aims: The HERMES (HEart failure Molecular Epidemiology for Therapeutic targetS) consortium aims to identify the genomic and molecular basis of heart failure. Methods and results: The consortium currently includes 51 studies from 11 countries, including 68 157 heart failure cases and 949 888 controls, with data on heart failure events and prognosis. All studies collected biological samples and performed genome‐wide genotyping of common genetic variants. The enrolment of subjects into participating studies ranged from 1948 to the present day, and the median follow‐up following heart failure diagnosis ranged from 2 to 116 months. Forty‐nine of 51 individual studies enrolled participants of both sexes; in these studies, participants with heart failure were predominantly male (34–90%). The mean age at diagnosis or ascertainment across all studies ranged from 54 to 84 years. Based on the aggregate sample, we estimated 80% power to genetic variant associations with risk of heart failure with an odds ratio of ≥1.10 for common variants (allele frequency ≥ 0.05) and ≥1.20 for low‐frequency variants (allele frequency 0.01–0.05) at P < 5 × 10−8 under an additive genetic model. Conclusions: HERMES is a global collaboration aiming to (i) identify the genetic determinants of heart failure; (ii) generate insights into the causal pathways leading to heart failure and enable genetic approaches to target prioritization; and (iii) develop genomic tools for disease stratification and risk prediction.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Rovin, B.H.; Adler, S.G.; Barratt, J.; Bridoux, F.; Burdge, K.A.; Chan, T.M.; Cook, H.T.; Fervenza, F.C.; Gibson, K.L.; Glassock, R.J.; +26 more
    Publisher: Elsevier BV
    Countries: United Kingdom, Netherlands

    The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Clinical Practice Guideline for the Management of Glomerular Diseases is an update to the KDIGO 2012 guideline. The aim is to assist clinicians caring for individuals with glomerulonephritis (GN), both adults and children. The scope includes various glomerular diseases, including IgA nephropathy and IgA vasculitis, membranous nephropathy, nephrotic syndrome, minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), infection-related GN, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) vasculitis, lupus nephritis, and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody GN. In addition, this guideline will be the first to address the subtype of complement-mediated diseases. Each chapter follows the same format providing guidance related to diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and special situations. The goal of the guideline is to generate a useful resource for clinicians and patients by providing actionable recommendations based on evidence syntheses, with useful infographics incorporating views from experts in the field. Another aim is to propose research recommendations for areas where there are gaps in knowledge. The guideline targets a broad global audience of clinicians treating GN while being mindful of implications for policy and cost. Development of this guideline update followed an explicit process whereby treatment approaches and guideline recommendations are based on systematic reviews of relevant studies, and appraisal of the quality of the evidence and the strength of recommendations followed the "Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation" (GRADE) approach. Limitations of the evidence are discussed, with areas of future research also presented.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Annabelle Haudry; Adrian E. Platts; Emilio Vello; Douglas R. Hoen; Mickael Leclercq; Robert J. Williamson; Ewa Forczek; Zoé Joly-Lopez; Joshua G. Steffen; Khaled M. Hazzouri; +19 more
    Countries: France, Netherlands, France
    Project: NSF | 2010 Project: Arabidopsis... (0929262)

    Despite the central importance of noncoding DNA to gene regulation and evolution, understanding of the extent of selection on plant noncoding DNA remains limited compared to that of other organisms. Here we report sequencing of genomes from three Brassicaceae species (Leavenworthia alabamica, Sisymbrium irio and Aethionema arabicum) and their joint analysis with six previously sequenced crucifer genomes. Conservation across orthologous bases suggests that at least 17% of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome is under selection, with nearly one-quarter of the sequence under selection lying outside of coding regions. Much of this sequence can be localized to approximately 90,000 conserved noncoding sequences (CNSs) that show evidence of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Population genomics analyses of two crucifer species, A. thaliana and Capsella grandiflora, confirm that most of the identified CNSs are evolving under medium to strong purifying selection. Overall, these CNSs highlight both similarities and several key differences between the regulatory DNA of plants and other species.

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; Abouzeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; +197 more
    Countries: Italy, Germany, Turkey, Italy, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, United Kingdom, United Kingdom ...

    The performance of the jet trigger for the ATLAS detector at the LHC during the 2011 data taking period is described. During 2011 the LHC provided proton-proton collisions with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and heavy ion collisions with a 2.76 TeV per nucleon-nucleon collision energy. The ATLAS trigger is a three level system designed to reduce the rate of events from the 40 MHz nominal maximum bunch crossing rate to the approximate 400 Hz which can be written to offline storage. The ATLAS jet trigger is the primary means for the online selection of events containing jets. Events are accepted by the trigger if they contain one or more jets above some transverse energy threshold. During 2011 data taking the jet trigger was fully efficient for jets with transverse energy above 25 GeV for triggers seeded randomly at Level 1. For triggers which require a jet to be identified at each of the three trigger levels, full efficiency is reached for offline jets with transverse energy above 60 GeV. Jets reconstructed in the Event Filter and corresponding to offline jets with transverse energy greater than 60 GeV, are reconstructed with a resolution in transverse energy of better than 4% in the central region and better than 2.5% in the forward direction. 51 pages plus author list (68 pages total), 29 figures, 4 tables, published version, all figures are available at https://atlas.web.cern.ch/Atlas/GROUPS/PHYSICS/PAPERS/TRIG-2012-01/

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Jeroen R. Huyghe; Stephanie A. Bien; Tabitha A. Harrison; Hyun Min Kang; Sai Chen; Stephanie L. Schmit; David V. Conti; Conghui Qu; Jihyoun Jeon; Christopher K. Edlund; +176 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, Spain, France, United Kingdom, Netherlands, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, Italy
    Project: WT

    To further dissect the genetic architecture of colorectal cancer (CRC), we performed whole-genome sequencing of 1,439 cases and 720 controls, imputed discovered sequence variants and Haplotype Reference Consortium panel variants into genome-wide association study data, and tested for association in 34,869 cases and 29,051 controls. Findings were followed up in an additional 23,262 cases and 38,296 controls. We discovered a strongly protective 0.3% frequency variant signal at CHD1. In a combined meta-analysis of 125,478 individuals, we identified 40 new independent signals at P<5×10−8, bringing the number of known independent signals for CRC to approximately 100. New signals implicate lower-frequency variants, Krüppel-like factors, Hedgehog signaling, Hippo-YAP signaling, long noncoding RNAs, somatic drivers, and support a role of immune function. Heritability analyses suggest that CRC risk is highly polygenic, and larger, more comprehensive studies enabling rare variant analysis will improve understanding of underlying biology, and impact personalized screening strategies and drug development. Reporting Summary. Further information on experimental design is available in the Life Sciences Reporting Summary linked to this article.

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bentham, James; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Zhou, Bin; Bixby, Honor; Cowan, Melanie J.; Fortunato, Lea; Bennett, James E.; Danaei, Goodarz; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; +262 more
    Countries: Croatia, United Kingdom, Belgium, Cyprus, Poland, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom, United Kingdom ...
    Project: EC | HYPERGENES (201550), WT , WT | A Global Database on Card... (101506)

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. http://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed published version Article

  • Publication . Conference object . 2015
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Kong Aik Lee; Anthony Larcher; Guangsen Wang; Patrick Kenny; Niko Brümmer; David A. van Leeuwen; Hagai Aronowitz; Marcel Kockmann; Carlos Vaquero; Bin Ma; +5 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD

    International audience; This paper describes data collection efforts conducted as part of the RedDots project which is dedicated to the study of speaker recognition under conditions where test utterances are of short duration and of variable phonetic content. At the current stage, we focus on English speakers, both native and non-native, recruited worldwide. This is made possible through the use of a recording front-end consisting of an application running on mobile devices communicating with a centralized web server at the back-end. Speech recordings are collected by having speakers read text prompts displayed on the screen of the mobile devices. We aim to collect a large number of sessions from each speaker over a long time span, typically one session per week over a one year period. The corpus is expected to include rich inter-speaker and intra-speaker variations, both intrinsic and extrinsic (that is, due to recording channel and acoustic environment).

  • Publication . Other literature type . Article . Preprint . 2007
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    V.M. Abazov; B. Abbott; M. Abolins; B.S. Acharya; M. Adams; T. Adams; M. Agelou; E. Aguilo; S.H. Ahn; M. Ahsan; +190 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: France, France, United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, France, France, France
    Project: NSERC

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel based on approximately 370/pb of data collected by the D0 experiment during Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We employ two different methods to extract the top quark mass. We show that both methods yield consistent results using ensemble tests of events generated with the D0 Monte Carlo simulation. We combine the results from the two methods to obtain a top quark mass m_t = 178.1 +/- 8.2 GeV. The statistical uncertainty is 6.7 GeV and the systematic uncertainty is 4.8 GeV. Comment: 7 pages, 2 figures

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    J.-M. Legay;
    Publisher: BioMed Central

    International audience

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    V. M. Abazov; Brad Abbott; Todd Adams; G. Alkhazov; George Alverson; Gilvan Alves; L. S. Ancu; M. Arov; Andrew Askew; J. Backusmayes; +204 more
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Countries: United Kingdom, France

    correlation, assuming that the spin of the top quark is either correlated with the spin of the anti-top quark as predicted by the standard model or is uncorrelated. For the first time we use a matrix-element-based approach to study ttbar spin correlation. We use {ttbar -> W+bW-bbar ->l+nubl-nub} final states produced in ppbar collisions at a center of mass energy sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV, where l denotes an electron or a muon. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 and were collected with the dzero detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The result agrees with the standard model prediction. We exclude the hypothesis that the spins of the ttbar are uncorrelated at the 97.7% C.L. 7 pages, 3 figures, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett