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  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    James O'Sullivan; Oliver Lunt; Christoph W. Zollitsch; M. L. W. Thewalt; John J. L. Morton; Arijeet Pal;
    Publisher: IOP Publishing
    Project: UKRI | EPSRC Centre for Doctoral... (EP/L015242/1), EC | LOQO-MOTIONS (771493), EC | Corr-NEQM (853368)

    Abstract Discrete time-translational symmetry in a periodically driven many-body system can be spontaneously broken to form a discrete time crystal, an exotic new phase of matter. We present observations characteristic of discrete time crystalline order in a driven system of paramagnetic P-donor impurities in isotopically enriched 28Si cooled below 10 K. The observations exhibit a stable subharmonic peak at half the drive frequency which remains pinned even in the presence of pulse error, a signature of discrete time crystalline order. This signal has a finite lifetime of ∼100 Floquet periods, but this effect is long-lived relative to coherent spin–spin interaction timescales, lasting ∼104 times longer. We present simulations of the system based on the paradigmatic central spin model and show good agreement with experiment. We investigate the role of dissipation and interactions within this model, and show that both are capable of giving rise to discrete time crystal-like behaviour.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Conference object . 2004
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sajina, Anna; Scott, Douglas; Dennefeld, Michel; Dole, Herve; Lacy, Mark; Lagache, Guilaine;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: NSERC

    We present preliminary results on a study of the 2--850 micron SEDs of a sample of 30 FIRBACK galaxies selected at 170 micron. These sources are representative of the brightest ~10% of the Cosmic Infrared Background. They are a mixture of mostly local (z<~0.3) starforming galaxies, and a tail of ULIGs that extend up to z~1, and are likely to be a similar population to faint SCUBA sources. We use archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS data to extend the spectral coverage to the mid-IR regime, resulting in an unprecended (for this redshift range) census of their infrared SEDs. This allows us to study in far greater detail this important population linking the near-IR stellar emission with PAH and thermal dust emission. We do this using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which easily allows for the inclusion of ~6 free parameters, as well as an estimate of parameter uncertainties and correlations. Comment: 5 pages, 3 figures. Proceeding for the conference "Starbursts: From 30 Doradus to Lyman Break Galaxies", held in Cambridge (UK) in September, 2004

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lars Kober; Manuel Martinez-Selles; Salim Yusuf; Antoni Bayes-Genis; Kim Krogsgaard; Olav Wendelboe Nielsen; Aldo Pietro Maggioni; Finlay McAlister; Carlos Fernandez-Palomeque; Albert Gabarrús; +10 more
    Country: Australia

    Aims Treatment of patients with heart failure (HF) relies on measurement of LVEF. However, the extent to which EF is recorded varies markedly. We sought to characterize the patient group that is missing a measure of EF, and to explore the association between missing EF and outcome. Methods and results Individual data on 30 445 patients from 28 observational studies in the Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure (MAGGIC) project were used to compare the prevalence of co-morbidities and outcome across three groups of HF patients: those with missing EF (HF-mEF), reduced EF (HF-REF), and preserved EF (HF-PEF). A total of 29% had HF-mEF, 52% HF-REF, and 19% HF-PEF. Compared with patients in whom EF was known, patients with HF-mEF were older, had a greater prevalence of COPD and previous stroke, and were smokers. Patients with HF-mEF were less likely to receive evidence-based treatment than those with HF-REF. Adjusted mortality in HF-mEF was similar to that in HF-REF and greater than that in HF-PEF at 3 years [HF-REF, hazard ratio (HR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95–1.12); HF-PEF, HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.71–0.86]. Conclusion Missing EF is common. The short- and long-term outcome of patients with HF-mEF is poor and they exhibit different co-morbidity profiles and treatment patterns compared with patients with known EF. HF patients with missing EF represent a high risk group.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Patrícia B. S. Celestino-Soper; Cindy Skinner; Richard J. Schroer; Patricia A. Eng; Jayant P. Shenai; Malgorzata M.J. Nowaczyk; Deborah Terespolsky; Donna Cushing; Gayle Patel; LaDonna Immken; +9 more
    Publisher: Springer Nature
    Project: WT

    Abstract Interstitial deletions of the short arm of chromosome 6 are rare and have been associated with developmental delay, hypotonia, congenital anomalies, and dysmorphic features. We used array comparative genomic hybridization in a South Carolina Autism Project (SCAP) cohort of 97 subjects with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and identified an ~ 5.4 Mb deletion on chromosome 6p22.3-p23 in a 15-year-old patient with intellectual disability and ASDs. Subsequent database queries revealed five additional individuals with overlapping submicroscopic deletions and presenting with developmental and speech delay, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, heart defects, and dysmorphic features. The deletion found in the SCAP patient harbors ATXN1, DTNBP1, JARID2, and NHLRC1 that we propose may be responsible for ASDs and developmental delay.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sudhakar George; Chun Shing Kwok; Glen P. Martin; Aswin Babu; Adrian Shufflebotham; James Nolan; Karim Ratib; Rodrigo Bagur; Mark Gunning; Mamas A. Mamas;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular abnormality and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is being increasingly used to treat patients considered too high risk for conventional surgery. We aimed to assess the prevalence of comorbid conditions in patients undergoing TAVI using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and to assess their impact on clinical and procedural outcomes. Methods We analysed 158 patients who underwent a TAVI at our institution between June 2009 and September 2015 to define their co-morbid burden as measured with CCI, and study its impact on procedural characteristics and mortality at 30 days. Results One hundred fifty-eight (158) patients with a mean age of 82 ± 8 years and a mean CCI score of 2.67 underwent a TAVI. Only 12/158 patients had a CCI of 0. The commonest cardiovascular comorbidities were previous myocardial infarction (24%), congestive heart failure (15%) and diabetes mellitus (23%) whilst the commonest non-cardiovascular comorbidities were renal disease (46%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (29%). After multivariable adjustment, CCI was not independently associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The addition of CCI to scoring systems such as Logistic EuroScore (LES) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk models improved the area under the curve from 0.75 (95%CI: 0.44–1.00) and 0.83 (95%CI: 0.64–1.00) to 0.78 (95%CI: 0.53–1.00) and 0.89 (95%CI: 0.78–1.00) respectively. Conclusions The burden of comorbid conditions in patients undergoing TAVI is significant. The CCI score was not independently associated with a higher risk of death but can be useful in addition to LES and STS risk models in informing decision making on the selection of patients for TAVI.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Susann Tegtmeier; Michaela I. Hegglin; John Anderson; Adam Bourassa; Samuel Brohede; D. A. Degenstein; Lucien Froidevaux; R. A. Fuller; Bernd Funke; John C. Gille; +17 more
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)

    A comprehensive quality assessment of the ozone products from 18 limb-viewing satellite instruments is provided by means of a detailed intercomparison. The ozone climatologies in form of monthly zonal mean time series covering the upper troposphere to lower mesosphere are obtained from LIMS, SAGE I/II/III, UARS-MLS, HALOE, POAM II/III, SMR, OSIRIS, MIPAS, GOMOS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS, ACE-MAESTRO, Aura-MLS, HIRDLS, and SMILES within 1978–2010. The intercomparisons focus on mean biases of annual zonal mean fields, interannual variability, and seasonal cycles. Additionally, the physical consistency of the data is tested through diagnostics of the quasi-biennial oscillation and Antarctic ozone hole. The comprehensive evaluations reveal that the uncertainty in our knowledge of the atmospheric ozone mean state is smallest in the tropical and midlatitude middle stratosphere with a 1σ multi-instrument spread of less than ±5%. While the overall agreement among the climatological data sets is very good for large parts of the stratosphere, individual discrepancies have been identified, including unrealistic month-to-month fluctuations, large biases in particular atmospheric regions, or inconsistencies in the seasonal cycle. Notable differences between the data sets exist in the tropical lower stratosphere (with a spread of ±30%) and at high latitudes (±15%). In particular, large relative differences are identified in the Antarctic during the time of the ozone hole, with a spread between the monthly zonal mean fields of ±50%. The evaluations provide guidance on what data sets are the most reliable for applications such as studies of ozone variability, model-measurement comparisons, detection of long-term trends, and data-merging activities.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barbara L. Shacklett; Julià Blanco; Lisa B. Hightow-Weidman; Nyaradzo Mgodi; José Alcamí; Susan Buchbinder; Mike Chirenje; Smritee Dabee; Mamadou H. Diallo; Kostyantyn Dumchev; +18 more
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Countries: United Kingdom, United States, Spain
    Project: NIH | HIV Research for Preventi... (1R13AI136762-01)

    The HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P) conference is dedicated to advancing HIV prevention research, responding to a growing consensus that effective and durable prevention will require a combination of approaches as well as unprecedented collaboration among scientists, practitioners, and community workers from different fields and geographic areas. The conference theme in 2018, "From Research to Impact," acknowledged an increasing focus on translation of promising research findings into practical, accessible, and affordable HIV prevention options for those who need them worldwide. HIVR4P 2018 was held in Madrid, Spain, on 21-25 October, with >1,400 participants from 52 countries around the globe, representing all aspects of HIV prevention research and implementation. The program included 137 oral and 610 poster presentations. This article presents a brief summary of highlights from the conference. More detailed information, complete abstracts as well as webcasts and daily Rapporteur summaries may be found on the conference website. Supported by Gilead who provided funding. Gilead has had no input into the content of the materials used at this meeting/conference. No other pharmaceutical company has had input into the content of the materials used at this conference. HIVR4P 2018 was made possible in part by 1 R13 AI136762-01 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Sí

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2008
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    David, Matei; Pitassi, Toniann;
    Project: NSERC

    We provide a non-explicit separation of the number-on-forehead communication complexity classes RP and NP when the number of players is up to \delta log(n) for any \delta<1. Recent lower bounds on Set-Disjointness [LS08,CA08] provide an explicit separation between these classes when the number of players is only up to o(loglog(n)).

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bentham, James; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Zhou, Bin; Bixby, Honor; Cowan, Melanie J.; Fortunato, Lea; Bennett, James E.; Danaei, Goodarz; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; +263 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Sweden, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Finland, Peru, Poland, Malta, Germany ...
    Project: WT | A Global Database on Card... (101506), WT , EC | HYPERGENES (201550)

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. http://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed published version Article

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Karoline Kuchenbaecker; Kyriaki Michailidou; Gustavo Mendoza-Fandiño; Janna Lilyquist; Curtis Olswold; Emily Hallberg; Habibul Ahsan; Kristiina Aittomäki; Irene L. Andrulis; Hoda Anton-Culver; +198 more
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands, Spain, United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Spain ...
    Project: CIHR , NIH | Elucidating Loci Involved... (5U19CA148537-02), EC | COGS (223175), NWO | Secure and gentle grip of... (11477), NIH | Follow-up of Ovarian Canc... (3U19CA148112-04S1), NIH | A genome-wide association... (5R01CA128978-02), WT , NIH | Discovery Expansion and R... (5U19CA148065-04)

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. B.C.A.C. was funded through a European Community Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no 223175 (HEALTH-F2-2009-223175; COGS); Cancer Research UK (C1287/A10118, C1287/A10710, C12292/A11174, C1281/A12014, C5047/A8384, C5047/A15007, C5047/A10692); the National Institutes of Health Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Breast Cancer (CA116201), R01 grants (CA128978, CA176785, CA192393), and Post-Cancer GWAS initiative (1U19 CA148537, 1U19 CA148065 and 1U19 CA148112 - the GAME-ON initiative); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for the CIHR Team in Familial Risks of Breast Cancer, the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation, and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. CIMBA genotyping was supported by National Institutes of Health grant (CA128978); the Department of Defence (W81XWH-10-1-0341); and the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation. CIMBA data management and data analysis were supported by Cancer Research UK grants C12292/A11174 and C1287/A10118. This study made use of data generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control consortium. Functional studies were supported by the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation. A full description of funding and acknowledgments is provided in Supplementary Note 1.

Include:
137,483 Research products, page 1 of 13,749
  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    James O'Sullivan; Oliver Lunt; Christoph W. Zollitsch; M. L. W. Thewalt; John J. L. Morton; Arijeet Pal;
    Publisher: IOP Publishing
    Project: UKRI | EPSRC Centre for Doctoral... (EP/L015242/1), EC | LOQO-MOTIONS (771493), EC | Corr-NEQM (853368)

    Abstract Discrete time-translational symmetry in a periodically driven many-body system can be spontaneously broken to form a discrete time crystal, an exotic new phase of matter. We present observations characteristic of discrete time crystalline order in a driven system of paramagnetic P-donor impurities in isotopically enriched 28Si cooled below 10 K. The observations exhibit a stable subharmonic peak at half the drive frequency which remains pinned even in the presence of pulse error, a signature of discrete time crystalline order. This signal has a finite lifetime of ∼100 Floquet periods, but this effect is long-lived relative to coherent spin–spin interaction timescales, lasting ∼104 times longer. We present simulations of the system based on the paradigmatic central spin model and show good agreement with experiment. We investigate the role of dissipation and interactions within this model, and show that both are capable of giving rise to discrete time crystal-like behaviour.

  • Publication . Article . Preprint . Conference object . 2004
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sajina, Anna; Scott, Douglas; Dennefeld, Michel; Dole, Herve; Lacy, Mark; Lagache, Guilaine;
    Publisher: HAL CCSD
    Country: France
    Project: NSERC

    We present preliminary results on a study of the 2--850 micron SEDs of a sample of 30 FIRBACK galaxies selected at 170 micron. These sources are representative of the brightest ~10% of the Cosmic Infrared Background. They are a mixture of mostly local (z<~0.3) starforming galaxies, and a tail of ULIGs that extend up to z~1, and are likely to be a similar population to faint SCUBA sources. We use archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS data to extend the spectral coverage to the mid-IR regime, resulting in an unprecended (for this redshift range) census of their infrared SEDs. This allows us to study in far greater detail this important population linking the near-IR stellar emission with PAH and thermal dust emission. We do this using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, which easily allows for the inclusion of ~6 free parameters, as well as an estimate of parameter uncertainties and correlations. Comment: 5 pages, 3 figures. Proceeding for the conference "Starbursts: From 30 Doradus to Lyman Break Galaxies", held in Cambridge (UK) in September, 2004

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Lars Kober; Manuel Martinez-Selles; Salim Yusuf; Antoni Bayes-Genis; Kim Krogsgaard; Olav Wendelboe Nielsen; Aldo Pietro Maggioni; Finlay McAlister; Carlos Fernandez-Palomeque; Albert Gabarrús; +10 more
    Country: Australia

    Aims Treatment of patients with heart failure (HF) relies on measurement of LVEF. However, the extent to which EF is recorded varies markedly. We sought to characterize the patient group that is missing a measure of EF, and to explore the association between missing EF and outcome. Methods and results Individual data on 30 445 patients from 28 observational studies in the Meta-Analysis Global Group in Chronic Heart Failure (MAGGIC) project were used to compare the prevalence of co-morbidities and outcome across three groups of HF patients: those with missing EF (HF-mEF), reduced EF (HF-REF), and preserved EF (HF-PEF). A total of 29% had HF-mEF, 52% HF-REF, and 19% HF-PEF. Compared with patients in whom EF was known, patients with HF-mEF were older, had a greater prevalence of COPD and previous stroke, and were smokers. Patients with HF-mEF were less likely to receive evidence-based treatment than those with HF-REF. Adjusted mortality in HF-mEF was similar to that in HF-REF and greater than that in HF-PEF at 3 years [HF-REF, hazard ratio (HR) 1.03, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.95–1.12); HF-PEF, HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.71–0.86]. Conclusion Missing EF is common. The short- and long-term outcome of patients with HF-mEF is poor and they exhibit different co-morbidity profiles and treatment patterns compared with patients with known EF. HF patients with missing EF represent a high risk group.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Patrícia B. S. Celestino-Soper; Cindy Skinner; Richard J. Schroer; Patricia A. Eng; Jayant P. Shenai; Malgorzata M.J. Nowaczyk; Deborah Terespolsky; Donna Cushing; Gayle Patel; LaDonna Immken; +9 more
    Publisher: Springer Nature
    Project: WT

    Abstract Interstitial deletions of the short arm of chromosome 6 are rare and have been associated with developmental delay, hypotonia, congenital anomalies, and dysmorphic features. We used array comparative genomic hybridization in a South Carolina Autism Project (SCAP) cohort of 97 subjects with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and identified an ~ 5.4 Mb deletion on chromosome 6p22.3-p23 in a 15-year-old patient with intellectual disability and ASDs. Subsequent database queries revealed five additional individuals with overlapping submicroscopic deletions and presenting with developmental and speech delay, seizures, behavioral abnormalities, heart defects, and dysmorphic features. The deletion found in the SCAP patient harbors ATXN1, DTNBP1, JARID2, and NHLRC1 that we propose may be responsible for ASDs and developmental delay.

  • Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Sudhakar George; Chun Shing Kwok; Glen P. Martin; Aswin Babu; Adrian Shufflebotham; James Nolan; Karim Ratib; Rodrigo Bagur; Mark Gunning; Mamas A. Mamas;
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Country: United Kingdom

    Background Aortic stenosis (AS) is a common valvular abnormality and transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is being increasingly used to treat patients considered too high risk for conventional surgery. We aimed to assess the prevalence of comorbid conditions in patients undergoing TAVI using the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) and to assess their impact on clinical and procedural outcomes. Methods We analysed 158 patients who underwent a TAVI at our institution between June 2009 and September 2015 to define their co-morbid burden as measured with CCI, and study its impact on procedural characteristics and mortality at 30 days. Results One hundred fifty-eight (158) patients with a mean age of 82 ± 8 years and a mean CCI score of 2.67 underwent a TAVI. Only 12/158 patients had a CCI of 0. The commonest cardiovascular comorbidities were previous myocardial infarction (24%), congestive heart failure (15%) and diabetes mellitus (23%) whilst the commonest non-cardiovascular comorbidities were renal disease (46%) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (29%). After multivariable adjustment, CCI was not independently associated with adverse clinical outcomes. The addition of CCI to scoring systems such as Logistic EuroScore (LES) and Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) risk models improved the area under the curve from 0.75 (95%CI: 0.44–1.00) and 0.83 (95%CI: 0.64–1.00) to 0.78 (95%CI: 0.53–1.00) and 0.89 (95%CI: 0.78–1.00) respectively. Conclusions The burden of comorbid conditions in patients undergoing TAVI is significant. The CCI score was not independently associated with a higher risk of death but can be useful in addition to LES and STS risk models in informing decision making on the selection of patients for TAVI.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Susann Tegtmeier; Michaela I. Hegglin; John Anderson; Adam Bourassa; Samuel Brohede; D. A. Degenstein; Lucien Froidevaux; R. A. Fuller; Bernd Funke; John C. Gille; +17 more
    Publisher: American Geophysical Union (AGU)

    A comprehensive quality assessment of the ozone products from 18 limb-viewing satellite instruments is provided by means of a detailed intercomparison. The ozone climatologies in form of monthly zonal mean time series covering the upper troposphere to lower mesosphere are obtained from LIMS, SAGE I/II/III, UARS-MLS, HALOE, POAM II/III, SMR, OSIRIS, MIPAS, GOMOS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS, ACE-MAESTRO, Aura-MLS, HIRDLS, and SMILES within 1978–2010. The intercomparisons focus on mean biases of annual zonal mean fields, interannual variability, and seasonal cycles. Additionally, the physical consistency of the data is tested through diagnostics of the quasi-biennial oscillation and Antarctic ozone hole. The comprehensive evaluations reveal that the uncertainty in our knowledge of the atmospheric ozone mean state is smallest in the tropical and midlatitude middle stratosphere with a 1σ multi-instrument spread of less than ±5%. While the overall agreement among the climatological data sets is very good for large parts of the stratosphere, individual discrepancies have been identified, including unrealistic month-to-month fluctuations, large biases in particular atmospheric regions, or inconsistencies in the seasonal cycle. Notable differences between the data sets exist in the tropical lower stratosphere (with a spread of ±30%) and at high latitudes (±15%). In particular, large relative differences are identified in the Antarctic during the time of the ozone hole, with a spread between the monthly zonal mean fields of ±50%. The evaluations provide guidance on what data sets are the most reliable for applications such as studies of ozone variability, model-measurement comparisons, detection of long-term trends, and data-merging activities.

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Barbara L. Shacklett; Julià Blanco; Lisa B. Hightow-Weidman; Nyaradzo Mgodi; José Alcamí; Susan Buchbinder; Mike Chirenje; Smritee Dabee; Mamadou H. Diallo; Kostyantyn Dumchev; +18 more
    Publisher: eScholarship, University of California
    Countries: United Kingdom, United States, Spain
    Project: NIH | HIV Research for Preventi... (1R13AI136762-01)

    The HIV Research for Prevention (HIVR4P) conference is dedicated to advancing HIV prevention research, responding to a growing consensus that effective and durable prevention will require a combination of approaches as well as unprecedented collaboration among scientists, practitioners, and community workers from different fields and geographic areas. The conference theme in 2018, "From Research to Impact," acknowledged an increasing focus on translation of promising research findings into practical, accessible, and affordable HIV prevention options for those who need them worldwide. HIVR4P 2018 was held in Madrid, Spain, on 21-25 October, with >1,400 participants from 52 countries around the globe, representing all aspects of HIV prevention research and implementation. The program included 137 oral and 610 poster presentations. This article presents a brief summary of highlights from the conference. More detailed information, complete abstracts as well as webcasts and daily Rapporteur summaries may be found on the conference website. Supported by Gilead who provided funding. Gilead has had no input into the content of the materials used at this meeting/conference. No other pharmaceutical company has had input into the content of the materials used at this conference. HIVR4P 2018 was made possible in part by 1 R13 AI136762-01 from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Sí

  • Publication . Preprint . Article . 2008
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    David, Matei; Pitassi, Toniann;
    Project: NSERC

    We provide a non-explicit separation of the number-on-forehead communication complexity classes RP and NP when the number of players is up to \delta log(n) for any \delta<1. Recent lower bounds on Set-Disjointness [LS08,CA08] provide an explicit separation between these classes when the number of players is only up to o(loglog(n)).

  • Publication . Article . Other literature type . 2016
    Open Access English
    Authors: 
    Bentham, James; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Stevens, Gretchen A.; Zhou, Bin; Bixby, Honor; Cowan, Melanie J.; Fortunato, Lea; Bennett, James E.; Danaei, Goodarz; Hajifathalian, Kaveh; +263 more
    Countries: United Kingdom, Sweden, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Finland, Peru, Poland, Malta, Germany ...
    Project: WT | A Global Database on Card... (101506), WT , EC | HYPERGENES (201550)

    Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries. http://purl.org/eprint/status/PeerReviewed published version Article

  • Open Access
    Authors: 
    Karoline Kuchenbaecker; Kyriaki Michailidou; Gustavo Mendoza-Fandiño; Janna Lilyquist; Curtis Olswold; Emily Hallberg; Habibul Ahsan; Kristiina Aittomäki; Irene L. Andrulis; Hoda Anton-Culver; +198 more
    Countries: Belgium, Netherlands, Spain, United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Sweden, Spain, United Kingdom, Spain ...
    Project: CIHR , NIH | Elucidating Loci Involved... (5U19CA148537-02), EC | COGS (223175), NWO | Secure and gentle grip of... (11477), NIH | Follow-up of Ovarian Canc... (3U19CA148112-04S1), NIH | A genome-wide association... (5R01CA128978-02), WT , NIH | Discovery Expansion and R... (5U19CA148065-04)

    Common variants in 94 loci have been associated with breast cancer including 15 loci with genome-wide significant associations (P<5 × 10−8) with oestrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer and BRCA1-associated breast cancer risk. In this study, to identify new ER-negative susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) consisting of 4,939 ER-negative cases and 14,352 controls, combined with 7,333 ER-negative cases and 42,468 controls and 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers genotyped on the iCOGS array. We identify four previously unidentified loci including two loci at 13q22 near KLF5, a 2p23.2 locus near WDR43 and a 2q33 locus near PPIL3 that display genome-wide significant associations with ER-negative breast cancer. In addition, 19 known breast cancer risk loci have genome-wide significant associations and 40 had moderate associations (P<0.05) with ER-negative disease. Using functional and eQTL studies we implicate TRMT61B and WDR43 at 2p23.2 and PPIL3 at 2q33 in ER-negative breast cancer aetiology. All ER-negative loci combined account for ∼11% of familial relative risk for ER-negative disease and may contribute to improved ER-negative and BRCA1 breast cancer risk prediction. B.C.A.C. was funded through a European Community Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement no 223175 (HEALTH-F2-2009-223175; COGS); Cancer Research UK (C1287/A10118, C1287/A10710, C12292/A11174, C1281/A12014, C5047/A8384, C5047/A15007, C5047/A10692); the National Institutes of Health Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Breast Cancer (CA116201), R01 grants (CA128978, CA176785, CA192393), and Post-Cancer GWAS initiative (1U19 CA148537, 1U19 CA148065 and 1U19 CA148112 - the GAME-ON initiative); the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) for the CIHR Team in Familial Risks of Breast Cancer, the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation, and the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. CIMBA genotyping was supported by National Institutes of Health grant (CA128978); the Department of Defence (W81XWH-10-1-0341); and the Breast Cancer Res. Foundation. CIMBA data management and data analysis were supported by Cancer Research UK grants C12292/A11174 and C1287/A10118. This study made use of data generated by the Wellcome Trust Case Control consortium. Functional studies were supported by the Florida Breast Cancer Foundation. A full description of funding and acknowledgments is provided in Supplementary Note 1.