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University of Paris-Saclay

40 Projects, page 1 of 8
  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101076412
    Overall Budget: 1,485,720 EURFunder Contribution: 1,485,720 EUR
    Partners: University of Paris-Saclay

    A fundamental goal of Algebraic Geometry is to classify algebraic varieties up to isomorphism. This is extremely hard, already for surfaces, and open in general. It has become clear that we can only hope for a classification up to birational maps, that is, isomorphisms between dense open sets. Understanding birational maps is therefore a key step towards the classification of algebraic varieties. For one of the largest families of algebraic varieties, so-called Mori fibre spaces, any birational map between any two of them is composed of special birational maps called Sarkisov links. For surfaces over nice fields, Sarkisov links are well-understood, but little is known about them in dimension three or higher, over any field. The understanding of Sarkisov links will mean an enormous advance in the study of birational maps and a substantial leap towards a classification of a large family of algebraic varieties. The very ambitious aim of this project is to describe all Sarkisov links completely in any dimension and in several non-classical settings in terms of base-locus, contracted hypersurfaces and induced rational map on the bases of the implicated Mori fibre spaces. If achieved, it will revolutionize the study of birational maps and provide new exciting tools to determine classes of algebraic varieties in several settings. In dimension three and higher, already the classification of Sarkisov links over the field of complex numbers is extremely ambitious. Another very difficult task is to classify Sarkisov links over a field of positive characteristic, as the geometry of algebraic varieties over such fields is even more challenging than it is over the field of complex numbers. The Minimal Model program, a major active research area in Biratonal Geometry, has made tremendous advances in the last decades. Recently developed ideas and techniques allow the attack on birational maps between algebraic varieties by studying Sarkisov links.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101081181
    Overall Budget: 483,758 EURFunder Contribution: 250,000 EUR
    Partners: University of Paris-Saclay

    The purpose of this proposal is to support the organisation of the 2022 edition of the Week of Innovative Regions in Europe. The university Paris-Saclay was chosen to manage, organize and host the conference. The general objectives of WIRE are: • To contribute to research, innovation and regional development policies • To better position regional actors in order to enhance policy formation for effective innovative regional development • To contribute effectively to the future of Europe in relationship to integrative policies, European added value and real interregional cooperation and co-investments It will take place the 11-12-13th May 2022, 500 visitors are expected. It will look for greater synergies between the EU and Member State actions focusing on the priorities of the Horizon Europe programme 2021 - 2027, its headline targets, and the European Research Area. The title of the conference is “Towards a leading Europe in breakthrough innovation” Based on the fact that breakthrough innovation is a key strategic element of economic development in Europe, as well as on the international context, the WIRE conference proposes a reflection in two parts: • The first will be an overview of the tools available in Europe for the development of breakthrough innovation, especially those available at regional levels to help local developments., It will include a reflection on the articulation between actions and fundings at regional/national/European levels. • The second one proposes a declination of these tools to enforce the European strategy of becoming leader in breakthrough innovation for all stakeholders at different levels, and more specifically at regional levels. In this context, some key topics will be addressed:innovations with potential breakthrough and disruptive nature in a regional ecosystem, innovations with scale-up potential that may be too risky for private investors, the questions of fundings and also the relevant level: European? National? Regional ?

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 101031812
    Overall Budget: 196,708 EURFunder Contribution: 196,708 EUR
    Partners: University of Paris-Saclay

    Gypsum-based stromatolites (GS) make excellent paradigms for the investigation of fine-scale mineral-microbial interactions and for the detection of life remnants on gypsiferous deposits of Earth and Mars. Yet, they have been largely overlooked compared to the carbonate microbialites. To date we do not know: i) what is their exact mineralogy, ii) which microbial communities are associated to these structures, iii) what is the exact role of microbes and related bioproducts (e.g., exopolymeric substances) in mineral precipitation and stromatolite construction, and iv) which biosignatures may be preserved in GS. NanoBioS aims to address this knowledge gap by employing an interdisciplinary approach to study newly discovered gypsum-based stromatolites from Lake Bakili (Danakil Depression, Ethiopia) from a combined microbiology and mineralogy perspective. The Danakil Depression and the difficult-to-access and so-far unexplored Lake Bakili constitute a unique, natural laboratory for the study of both living and fossil gypsum microbialites, and a terrestrial Martian analogue-site. Besides the possibility to discover novel microbial lineages/metabolisms, we will attempt to identify characteristic associations of microbial groups with mineral assemblages and look for biosignatures. The overarching goal of NanoBioS is to gain a deeper understanding of the microbial influence on Ca-sulfate precipitation, as well as, to develop insights for distinguishing fossil life remnants from inorganic biomorphs on Earth and Martian chemical sediments. The host and secondment host laboratories that have advanced the subject of geomicrobiology of microbialites, will offer me intensive training in cutting-edge molecular biology and mineralogic tools, complementary to my so far geochemical expertise, aside to other, transferable skills. Overall, the development of NanoBioS will be career-defining and it will transform me in an independent, highly competitive, early stage bio-geo-chemist.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 894258
    Overall Budget: 196,708 EURFunder Contribution: 196,708 EUR
    Partners: University of Paris-Saclay

    There is an ever increasing amount of data that needs to be transmitted, processed, and stored by mobile communication technologies like today’s smartphones and tomorrow’s numerous connected devices. Presently, the raw measurement signals need to be amplified, pre-conditioned, and converted to digital signals before they can be processed. Thus, there is clear impetus to supplement next generation radio technologies with analog signal processing functionalities to perform computation directly on the measured signals. By conducting research at the interface between nanomagnetism, acoustics, microwave engineering and micro-electromechanical systems, MAXBAR aims to integrate low power spin-wave signal processing capabilities with state-of-the-art acoustic wave resonators widely used in RF communication systems to distinguish between signals at different frequencies. It is motivated by the premise that the coupling between spin-waves and acoustic waves in nanosystems can be leveraged (i) to overcome the intrinsic limitations plaguing acoustic wave technology, and (ii) to simultaneously deliver an energy efficient microwave interface for spin waves – the holy grail of magnonics. The primary objective is to establish a platform in which strongly hybridized magneto-elastic resonant modes enables new technological functionalities, such as the tunability of bulk acoustic wave filters and the development of non-reciprocity in acoustical wave based delay lines. The project builds upon the host institution’s expertise in microwave measurements of spin-wave propagation, interference processes and magnetization dynamics, while relying on next-generation acoustic wave resonators developed at the secondment institute to demonstrate its objectives. The applicant is an expert in the design, fabrication and characterization of nanomechanical microwave devices and will thus complement its skills by adding nanomagnetism and acoustics in his competences.

  • Open Access mandate for Publications and Research data
    Funder: EC Project Code: 887438
    Overall Budget: 196,708 EURFunder Contribution: 196,708 EUR
    Partners: University of Paris-Saclay

    Geometry studies higher-dimensional curved spaces. We can describe these spaces by equations, but the only case where we have any hope to use them for calculation is when the equations are polynomials. The resulting spaces are the objects of algebraic geometry, which are called varieties. Although these objects have been studied for a long time, there are still lots of crucial open problems: If we are given a variety, can we embed it in other well-known varieties? For instance, can we find a ''nice'' surface which contains a given curve? If yes, how many such surfaces exist, and can we characterise them via some of the geometrical properties of the curve? The geometric information of varieties can be encoded in algebraic objects, known as derived categories. Inspired by ideas in string theory, Bridgeland introduced the notion of stability conditions on derived categories. This topic has been highly studied due to its connections to various fields in mathematics and physics, and lots of ideas and techniques have been developed in the area. Now is the time to employ the whole spectrum of modern tools in derived categories and stability conditions to solve so far intractable geometrical problems. My recent work proves that deformation of stability conditions and varying stability status of an object (wall-crossing phenomenon) are powerful new techniques for solving long-standing geometrical problems, that do not appear to involve derived categories. Surprisingly, stability conditions and wall-crossing truly provide the right context for studying those problems. The main goal of this research programme is to draw upon ideas and tools in algebra, geometry and mathematical physics to describe some outstanding geometrical problems in terms of derived categories and stability conditions, and then apply wall-crossing techniques to solve those problems.