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Broadcom (United Kingdom)

Country: United Kingdom

Broadcom (United Kingdom)

8 Projects, page 1 of 2
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/K023195/2
    Funder Contribution: 328,908 GBP

    Current applications for semiconductor lasers are wide ranging and pervade every aspect of life. Indeed, in the developed world, most people already own several lasers and gain the benefit of many more. With every new technology, this proliferation is set to continue. Most importantly, the laser enables the internet age since all data transmitted around the globe is carried as flashes of laser light. As a consequence most people in the developed world have come to depend on many lasers during a typical day. The reduction in their cost of ownership is therefore of critical importance to the extension of these benefits to the developing world and also bringing new benefits to us all. The potential future applications of photonics are seemingly unlimited, with new technologies and applications continuing to emerge. The key advantage of a semiconductor laser is that if an application has sufficiently large volume, the cost of the semiconductor laser is very low. The DVD player is a good example -with the laser costing a few pence each. The semiconductor laser therefore enables new technologies, devices and processes to be commercialized. However, semiconductor lasers must be able to generate the required "flavour" of light; i.e. the correct wavelength, spectral width, power, polarization, beam shape, etc. Some of the fundamental parameters of a semiconductor laser may be controlled by the design and choice of materials, e.g. wavelength, spectral purity (line-width). However, using current technologies the polarization and beam profile are generally fixed at manufacture and may only be subsequently altered by extrinsic optical components. This introduces additional cost (increasing the environmental impact) and reduces the overall efficiency and usefulness of the device. For future engineers and scientists it would be ideal if there were complete control of the output from a semiconductor laser, providing unlimited possibilities in terms of future applications. The alteration of matter on the scale of the wavelength of light is known to allow the control of the optical properties of a material. Even the laser in something as simple as a mouse incorporates a number of such technologies. We will develop novel nano-scale semiconductor fabrication to modify light-matter interaction and engineer the control of the polarization and form of a laser beam. Our work will realise a volume manufacturable photonic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL) for the first time. The nano-scale photonic crystal is responsible for controlling the properties of the laser. It is simply a periodic pattern similar in size to the light itself, a natural example of this periodic patterning produces the blue colour in some butterfly wings, or the iridescence of opal. In our case, every detail of the photonic crystal will be modeled, understood and optimized to control the properties of the laser to meet a range of needs. Lasers will be designed to exhibit almost zero divergence and will also allow, for the first time, the electronic control of divergence and polarization and allow the direct creation of custom engineered beam profiles and patterns. The realization of high efficiency, area scalable high power lasers with ideal beam profiles will contribute to reduced energy consumption in the manufacture of laser devices, and in their cost of ownership. The technologies developed will allow the ultimate in design control of future optical sources, hopefully limiting laser applications only to the imagination. Once successful, such devices will displace existing lasers in established commercial photonics and enable many more emerging application areas. This will be made possible by introducing both new functionality to laser devices and reducing the cost of existing products. We will develop this technology alongside physical understanding and device engineering, liaising closely with world-leaders in the volume manufacturer of such devices.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E064361/1
    Funder Contribution: 709,954 GBP

    Since the development of the first Kerr-lens mode-locked lasers in 1990, practical femtosecond lasers in a wide variety of configurations have delivered handsomely to a significant number of major scientific developments. It has to be recognised that the application space remains limited by the cost, complexity, skilled-user requirements and restricted flexibility of the current generation of ultrafast lasers. In this proposed joint project we seek to lead the way in the development of a new generation of ultrafast lasers. By adopting a modular approach for laser design we am aiming to demonstrate a platform from which lasers can be designed to address a wide range of user-specific requirements. By taking this approach, lasers for use in communications, for example, will have the necessary high repetition rates and low peak powers whereas for biophotonics high peak powers will be delivered to take full advantage of exploitable optical nonlinearities. We plan to work with vibronic crystals in both bulk and waveguide geometries and semiconductor quantum dot structures as the primary gain media. Although vibronic crystals have been deployed widely in ultrashort-pulse lasers the flexibility offered by conventional laser designs is very limited. To remedy this situation we intend to revolutionise cavity design to enable electrical control of the laser output parameters. For example, we wish to provide a means to users to change from an unmodelocked status to a femtosecond-pulse regime at the flick of switch. Also, by exploiting waveguiding in the vibronic crystals we are confident that we can introduce a new generation of highly compact lasers that will combine many of the advantages of a semiconductor laser with the most attractive features of crystal based devices. In some preliminary work in the Ultrafast Photonics Collaboration we have shown the potential of semiconductor quantum dot structures as broadband gain media that Can support the amplification and generation of femtosecond optical pulses. We now seek to build on those promising results and make the push towards truly flexible ultrafast lasers that will be amenable to external electronic control of the gain and loss components. Progress is expected to lead to a new generation of lasers that can give applications compatibility that far exceeds that available in traditional laser system designs. Within this strategy we plan to employ hybrid approaches where the benefits of semiconductor lasers will be combined with the energy storage capabilities of crystals to deliver compact and rugged sources having pulse characteristics that cover a range of durations, energies and profiles.A major part of this project effort will be devoted to the development of control functionality in ultrafast lasers. The intention is to use direct electrical control of intracavity components to deliver designer options for pulse shaping, modulated data streams, wavelength tuning and tailored dispersion. To ensure that this research is applicable we will evaluate the laser developments in the context of a set of identified demonstrators. These implementations will be used to show how design flexibility can deliver optimised lasers for biological, medical, communications and related applications.We have put together a research team having complementary of expertise and established track records of international excellence in photonics. This project as a whole will be managed from St Andrews University but all three research groups will undertake interactive research on all aspects of the laser development. We are confident that the work of this team will represent cutting-edge fundamental and translational research and it should represent a world leading strength for the UK in the development of new ultrafast lasers.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E06440X/1
    Funder Contribution: 1,092,590 GBP

    Since the development of the first Kerr-lens mode-locked lasers in 1990, practical femtosecond lasers in a wide variety of configurations have delivered handsomely to a significant number of major scientific developments. It has to be recognised that the application space remains limited by the cost, complexity, skilled-user requirements and restricted flexibility of the current generation of ultrafast lasers. In this proposed joint project we seek to lead the way in the development of a new generation of ultrafast lasers. By adopting a modular approach for laser design we are aiming to demonstrate a platform from which lasers can be designed to address a wide range of user-specific requirements. By taking this approach, lasers for use in communications, for example, will have the necessary high repetition rates and low peak powers whereas for biophotonics high peak powers will be delivered to take full advantage of exploitable optical nonlinearities. We plan to work with vibronic crystals in both bulk and waveguide geometries and semiconductor quantum dot structures as the primary gain media. Although vibronic crystals have been deployed widely in ultrashort-pulse lasers the flexibility offered by conventional laser designs is very limited. To remedy this situation we intend to revolutionise cavity design to enable electrical control of the laser output parameters. For example, we wish to provide a means to users to change from an unmodelocked status to a femtosecond-pulse regime at the flick of switch. Also, by exploiting waveguiding in vibronic crystals we are confident that we can introduce a new generation of highly compact lasers that will combine many of the advantages of a semiconductor laser with the most attractive features of crystal based devices. In some preliminary work in the Ultrafast Photonics Collaboration we have shown the potential of semiconductor quantum dot structures as broadband gain media that Can support the amplification and generation of femtosecond optical pulses. We now seek to build on those promising results and make the push towards truly flexible ultrafast lasers that will be amenable to external electronic control of the gain and loss components. Progress is expected to lead to a new generation of lasers that can give applications compatibility that far exceeds that available from traditional laser system designs. Within this strategy we plan to employ hybrid approaches where the benefits of semiconductor lasers will be combined with the energy storage capabilities of crystals to deliver compact and rugged sources having pulse characteristics that cover a range of durations, energies and profiles.A major part of this project effort will be devoted to the development of control functionality in ultrafast lasers. The intention is to use direct electrical control of intracavity components to deliver designer options for pulse shaping, modulated data streams, wavelength tuning and tailored dispersion. To ensure that this research is applicable we will evaluate the laser developments in the context of a set of identified demonstrators. These implementations will be used to show how design flexibility can deliver optimised lasers for biological, medical, communications and related applications.We have put together a research team having complementary of expertise and established track records of international excellence in photonics. This project as a whole will be managed from St Andrews University but all three research groups will undertake interactive research on all aspects of the laser development. We are confident that the work of this team will represent cutting-edge fundamental and translational research and it should represent a world leading strength for the UK in the development of new ultrafast lasers.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/E064450/1
    Funder Contribution: 748,990 GBP

    Since the development of the first Kerr-lens mode-locked lasers in 1990, practical femtosecond lasers in a wide variety of configurations have delivered handsomely to a significant number of major scientific developments. It has to be recognised that the application space remains limited by the cost, complexity, skilled-user requirements and restricted flexibility of the current generation of ultrafast lasers. In this proposed joint project we seek to lead the way in the development of a new generation of ultrafast lasers. By adopting a modular approach for laser design we are aiming to demonstrate a platform from which lasers can be designed to address a wide range of user-specific requirements. By taking this approach, lasers for use in communications, for example, will have the necessary high repetition rates and low peak powers whereas for biophotonics high peak powers will be delivered to take full advantage of exploitable optical nonlinearities. We plan to work with vibronic crystals in both bulk and waveguide geometries and semiconductor quantum dot structures as the primary gain media. Although vibronic crystals have been deployed widely in ultrashort-pulse lasers the flexibility offered by conventional laser designs is very limited. To remedy this situation we intend to revolutionise cavity design to enable electrical control of the laser output parameters. For example, we wish to provide a means to users to change from an unmodelocked status to a femtosecond-pulse regime on demand. Also, by exploiting waveguiding in vibronic crystals we are confident that we can introduce a new generation of highly compact lasers that will combine many of the advantages of a semiconductor laser with the most attractive features of crystal based devices. In some preliminary work in the Ultrafast Photonics Collaboration we have shown the potential of semiconductor quantum dot structures as broadband gain media that can support the amplification and generation of femtosecond optical pulses. We now seek to build on those promising results and move towards truly flexible ultrafast lasers that will be amenable to external electronic control of the gain and loss components. Progress is expected to lead to a new generation of lasers that can give applications compatibility that far exceeds available traditional laser system designs. Within this strategy we plan to employ hybrid approaches where the benefits of semiconductor lasers will be combined with the energy storage capabilities of crystals to deliver compact and rugged sources having pulse characteristics that cover a range of durations, energies and profiles.A major part of this project effort will be devoted to the development of control functionality in ultrafast lasers. The intention is to use direct electrical control of intracavity components to deliver designer options for pulse shaping, modulated data streams, wavelength tuning and tailored dispersion. To ensure that this research is applicable we will evaluate the laser developments in the context of a set of identified demonstrators. These implementations will be used to show how design flexibility can deliver optimised lasers for biological, medical, communications and related applications.We have put together a research team having complementary of expertise and established track records of international excellence in photonics. This project as a whole will be managed from St Andrews University but all three research groups will undertake interactive research on all aspects of the laser development. We are confident that the work of this team will represent cutting-edge fundamental and translational research and it should represent a world leading strength for the UK in the development of new ultrafast lasers.

    more_vert
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/K023195/1
    Funder Contribution: 702,565 GBP

    Current applications for semiconductor lasers are wide ranging and pervade every aspect of life. Indeed, in the developed world, most people already own several lasers and gain the benefit of many more. With every new technology, this proliferation is set to continue. Most importantly, the laser enables the internet age since all data transmitted around the globe is carried as flashes of laser light. As a consequence most people in the developed world have come to depend on many lasers during a typical day. The reduction in their cost of ownership is therefore of critical importance to the extension of these benefits to the developing world and also bringing new benefits to us all. The potential future applications of photonics are seemingly unlimited, with new technologies and applications continuing to emerge. The key advantage of a semiconductor laser is that if an application has sufficiently large volume, the cost of the semiconductor laser is very low. The DVD player is a good example -with the laser costing a few pence each. The semiconductor laser therefore enables new technologies, devices and processes to be commercialized. However, semiconductor lasers must be able to generate the required "flavour" of light; i.e. the correct wavelength, spectral width, power, polarization, beam shape, etc. Some of the fundamental parameters of a semiconductor laser may be controlled by the design and choice of materials, e.g. wavelength, spectral purity (line-width). However, using current technologies the polarization and beam profile are generally fixed at manufacture and may only be subsequently altered by extrinsic optical components. This introduces additional cost (increasing the environmental impact) and reduces the overall efficiency and usefulness of the device. For future engineers and scientists it would be ideal if there were complete control of the output from a semiconductor laser, providing unlimited possibilities in terms of future applications. The alteration of matter on the scale of the wavelength of light is known to allow the control of the optical properties of a material. Even the laser in something as simple as a mouse incorporates a number of such technologies. We will develop novel nano-scale semiconductor fabrication to modify light-matter interaction and engineer the control of the polarization and form of a laser beam. Our work will realise a volume manufacturable photonic crystal surface emitting laser (PCSEL) for the first time. The nano-scale photonic crystal is responsible for controlling the properties of the laser. It is simply a periodic pattern similar in size to the light itself, a natural example of this periodic patterning produces the blue colour in some butterfly wings, or the iridescence of opal. In our case, every detail of the photonic crystal will be modeled, understood and optimized to control the properties of the laser to meet a range of needs. Lasers will be designed to exhibit almost zero divergence and will also allow, for the first time, the electronic control of divergence and polarization and allow the direct creation of custom engineered beam profiles and patterns. The realization of high efficiency, area scalable high power lasers with ideal beam profiles will contribute to reduced energy consumption in the manufacture of laser devices, and in their cost of ownership. The technologies developed will allow the ultimate in design control of future optical sources, hopefully limiting laser applications only to the imagination. Once successful, such devices will displace existing lasers in established commercial photonics and enable many more emerging application areas. This will be made possible by introducing both new functionality to laser devices and reducing the cost of existing products. We will develop this technology alongside physical understanding and device engineering, liaising closely with world-leaders in the volume manufacturer of such devices.

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