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EORTC

European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer
Country: Belgium
17 Projects, page 1 of 4
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101103655
    Overall Budget: 5,486,730 EURFunder Contribution: 5,486,730 EUR

    Recurrent glioblastoma is an invariably fatal refractory cancer with dismal prognosis. Patients suffer from low quality of life and very burdensome symptoms. This project is proposing an investigator-initiated phase III randomised pragmatic clinical trial. We will assess whether the addition of radiation treatment to lomustine chemotherapy has superior efficacy as compared to lomustine chemotherapy alone for treatment of patients with recurrent glioblastoma. The study will apply minimal patient eligibility criteria, and thus be as close as possible to the routine clinical setting. Cost-effectiveness analysis will be performed to investigate the economic value of adding radiation treatment to lomustine chemotherapy in different countries to support evidence-informed policy decisions. If successful, the outcomes of the project will define a new evidence-based standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma. The proposed research could lead to improved patient survival and quality of life but also improving health system sustainability. This is a multidisciplinary and multistakeholder consortium involving clinical oncologists, radiation oncologists, health economists and patient representatives. The study design was successfully discussed with patients. This action is part of the Cancer Mission cluster of projects on ‘Diagnosis and treatment.”

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101103843
    Overall Budget: 4,971,880 EURFunder Contribution: 4,971,880 EUR

    Retroperitoneal sarcomas are rare diseases refractory to treatment with dismal prognosis. Surgery is the only standard approach to primary disease. We are proposing an innovative pragmatic approach supplementing a standard phase III clinical trial with an observational cohort. It is proposed to amend the ongoing phase III EORTC clinical trial STRASS2 investigating the added value of neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery for high-risk retroperitoneal sarcoma and to add an observational arm STREXIT2 that will capture real world data from patients not participating to STRASS2. We will compare the clinical outcomes between STRASS2 and STREXIT2 and explore the possible combination of STRASS2 and matched STREXIT2 patients to strengthen the results of the randomized clinical trial data and increase the power of subgroup analyses. If conclusive, the proposed research will help to understand the clinical added value and costs-effectiveness of neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery for high-risk retroperitoneal sarcoma. We will perform health economics analysis assessing the economic value of different treatment scenarios based on STRASS2 and STREXIT2. If successful, the outcomes of the project will define a new evidence-based standard of care for high-risk retroperitoneal sarcomas. The proposed research could lead to improved patient survival and quality of life but also improving health system sustainability. This is a multidisciplinary and multistakeholder consortium involving clinical oncologists, surgeons, health economists and patient representatives. The study design was successfully discussed with patients. This action is part of the Cancer Mission cluster of projects on ‘Diagnosis and treatment’.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101104574
    Overall Budget: 7,185,660 EURFunder Contribution: 7,185,660 EUR

    Prostate Cancer is the most common cancer in European men. Despite dramatic improvements in early diagnostic and local treatment, one out of five prostate cancer patients will die from their disease. Despite progress in the past years, it remains critical to improve on the present strategy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. Within the proposed project, we will evaluate whether intermittent intensified androgen deprivation treatment (iADT) in metastatic prostate cancer is not inferior to continuous treatment in terms of oncological benefit while minimizing side effects and resource utilization and improving patient quality of life. The proposed clinical trial is designed to detect early if iADT has a negative impact on overall survival compared to continuous therapy. If successful, the outcomes of the project will define a new evidence-based standard of care for metastatic hormone sensitive prostate cancer. The proposed research could lead to improved patient survival and quality of life but also improve health system sustainability. This is a multidisciplinary and multistakeholder consortium involving clinical oncologists, surgeons, health economists and patient representatives. The study design was successfully discussed with patients. This action is part of the Cancer Mission cluster of projects on ‘Diagnosis and treatment’.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 635342
    Overall Budget: 4,948,740 EURFunder Contribution: 4,948,740 EUR

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is increasingly being recognized as a heterogeneous disease with distinct molecular subtypes. These subtypes have different biological processes at the basis of their disease and consequently their prognosis and responses to therapy are also different. We have previously developed molecular diagnostic assays using a single platform on routine FFPE tumour biopsies. These assays identify gene expression profiles with distinct prognosis and drug response phenotypes (CMS4/c-type, BRAF mutant-like, and MSI-like). Our overall objective is to develop targeted therapies more effective than the current therapies that do not take advantage of molecular classification of the disease to select patients for therapy. We therefore propose to perform 3 two-stage single arm multi-centre open-label phase II studies based on solid preclinical evidence and a sound scientific rationale for these subgroups of CRC patients: 1) combination of chemotherapy and a TGF-βR inhibitor (LY2157299) in patients presenting a C-type signature; 2) vinorelbine in patients with a BRAFm-like signature; and 3) an immunotherapeutic anti-PD-L1 drug (MPDL3280A) in combination with bevacizumab in patients with a MSI-like signature. The primary objectives of these studies are to determine the clinical efficacy (progression-free survival as primary endpoint), safety and tolerability of the experimental treatments in these molecularly selected populations. Mutation analysis at the beginning of treatment and monitoring by liquid biopsies might reveal further biomarkers that predict response in retrospective analysis. The project outcomes may have a significant impact in CRC patients with poor-risk prognosis worldwide as 40-50% of them present gene expression profiles matching one of the 3 approaches. Around 40,000 European CRC patients may potentially benefit from the results. Also, these may be translated to other cancer types with equivalent gene expression patterns/deregulated signalling pathways.

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  • Funder: EC Project Code: 101057482
    Overall Budget: 7,292,900 EURFunder Contribution: 7,235,020 EUR

    STRONG-AYA is a new, interdisciplinary, multi-stakeholder European network to improve healthcare services, research and outcomes for Adolescents and Young Adults (AYA) with cancer, defined as individuals aged 15-39 years at cancer diagnosis. AYAs with cancer form a unique group; they face age-specific issues (e.g. infertility, unemployment, financial problems) and decreased quality of life due to cancer and its treatment. Unlike dedicated healthcare and trials for pediatric cancer patients, AYA-specific healthcare services are scarce and vary across Europe. AYAs who are at the core of society and economy need access to age-adjusted and high-quality healthcare. AYA-care and research will benefit from collection and pooling of patient-centered data and collaboration among all stakeholders: patients, healthcare professionals, scientists, and policymakers. Our consortium of clinical and scientific leaders in AYA-care, data science and registries, European Cancer Organisation, Youth Cancer Europe and EORTC will build on previous initiatives and EU grants. Within STRONG-AYA we will set up a value-based healthcare research ecosystem to develop data-driven, interactive policy and visualization tools that bring, in co-creation with all stakeholders including patients, novel insights into AYA healthcare. The project objectives, include: 1) Development of a Core Outcome Set (COS) for AYAs with cancer; 2) Implementation of the COS in 5 national healthcare systems (FR, IT, NL, UK, PL) and establish national infrastructures for outcome data management and clinical decision-making and a pan-European ecosystem that also welcomes future European countries; 3) Disseminate outcomes and facilitate interactions between national and pan-European stakeholders to develop data-driven analysis tools to process and present relevant outcomes, establish feedback loops for AYA cancer patients and the healthcare systems, and improve the reporting and assessment of outputs towards policy-makers.

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