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University of Sussex

Country: United Kingdom

University of Sussex

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1,234 Projects, page 1 of 247
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: AH/I505369/1
    Funder Contribution: 18,606 GBP

    Doctoral Training Partnerships: a range of postgraduate training is funded by the Research Councils. For information on current funding routes, see the common terminology at https://www.ukri.org/apply-for-funding/how-we-fund-studentships/. Training grants may be to one organisation or to a consortia of research organisations. This portal will show the lead organisation only.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 2518121

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) are now contributing to major advances in solar cell and display technologies, biological and medical imaging and nanophotonics. While these photoactive materials offer high, light harvesting and photoluminescence (PL) efficiencies, their performance is limited by a number of photo-instabilities that ultimately affect both photon absorption and emission yields, as well as their working lifetime in applications. The Osborne Lab conducts research into the mechanism and control of optical properties in nanoparticles, from classical CdSe quantum dots (QDs) to new perovskite (CsMX3, M=Pb, Sn, X=Cl, Br, I) QDs and nanowires (NWs) and now offers PhD research in this productive area.[1-4]

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/K011790/1
    Funder Contribution: 3,539,210 GBP

    Climate change poses an unprecedented challenge to the way societies operate. In order to address this challenge, the UK has set an ambitious target of 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Meeting this target will require not only decarbonising energy supply, but will also mean action to make the use of energy more efficient and to reduce energy demand. The proposed Centre on Innovation and Energy Demand will contribute to this challenge by developing an interdisciplinary understanding of the emergence, diffusion and impact of low-energy innovations - new technologies, organisational arrangements or modes of behaviour that are expected to improve energy efficiency and/or reduce energy demand. The Centre will be managed within the Sussex Energy Group (SEG) at SPRU, University of Sussex. SEG has a strong international reputation for policy-relevant interdisciplinary research on transitions to sustainable energy systems, focusing on both the supply and demand sides of these systems. Oxford University's Transport Studies Unit (TSU), a leading interdisciplinary research centre on transport futures, will also contribute to the Centre. The Centre's research and user engagement will be organised under three themes that focus on the emergence, diffusion and impact of different types of low-energy innovation. Each theme will encompass several research projects that provide a balanced coverage of research methodologies and empirical domains. The Centre will also conduct cross-cutting projects and integration activities, with the aim of synthesising the emerging findings from the three main research themes and effectively engaging stakeholders. Two cross cutting projects are proposed. The first will carry out a comparison of multiple low energy innovations to explore differences between incremental and radical innovations, and between those that are mainly technical and those that are largely social. The second will analyse synergies and trade-offs between policies to support low energy innovations and other, overlapping energy policies. A Low Energy Innovation Studio will also be established as the engagement hub of the Centre. It will oversee a number of functions including researcher placements in collaborating organisations, Centre workshops and events, visiting fellowships, summer schools and a final conference. The proposed research programme is inter-disciplinary, combining perspectives from different traditions within economics, innovation studies, political science and sociology. The programme will be developed and conducted in collaboration with non-academic organisations who will help identify research problems, contribute resources and case studies, and assist in engagement with practitioners. Centre researchers will collaborate with academic colleagues in the UK as well as with related international institutions. The Centre will produce a range of outputs tailored to different audiences including journal articles, reports and policy briefings. It will have a simple internal management structure, comprising a Director, Centre Manager and three research theme leaders, together with Advisory Group to steer its work. Finally it will develop research capacity by recruiting and developing junior researchers and by encouraging applications from doctoral researchers who would be associated with the Centre.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/P005926/1
    Funder Contribution: 22,178 GBP

    The EU and UK Biodiversity Strategies have set ambitious goals of halting the decline in biodiversity and restoring ecosystems to maximise the services nature provides society by 2020. This Open NERC Knowledge Exchange Fellowship will help policy-makers and practitioners achieve these goals by producing best-practice guidelines for upland natural process restoration or 'rewilding'. This will be achieved by bringing together a network of primarily NERC funded academics, with practitioners, policy-makers, professional bodies and businesses to exchange knowledge and experience. Success will help safe guard natural heritage for future generations, alleviate major national challenges such as flooding and water quality, and provide more resilient rural communities and economies. Rewilding is an emerging approach within inter-disciplinary conservation science. It is proposed as a complementary method to established biodiversity conservation by re-establishing natural processes to allow ecosystems to restore and sustain themselves. Where successful it will deliver a sustainable and cost-effective approach to conservation by reducing the recurrent costs associated with direct management. The overall aim of this Knowledge Exchange fellowship is to facilitate the restoration of naturally functioning upland ecosystems in Britain. The uplands are an important starting point because the impacts of actions here cascade down through river catchments with the flow of water, sediments and nutrients. The critical, overarching, natural processes considered for restoration will be predation, herbivory, disturbance and hydrology. The key objectives are: 1) to bring together academics, practitioners, policy makers and businesses in three workshops to co-produce best-practice guidelines to inform policy on natural process restoration; and 2) to disseminate these guidelines through direct engagement with stakeholders and through the creation of an online platform of resources. Rewilding Britain is a UK charity that aspires to see habitats expand, wildlife multiply, and communities flourish with new opportunities. An important ambition for Rewilding Britain is to work with the academic community to collate, synthesise and disseminate the best available research to their partners, government bodies, landowners and the public. They wish to use this collaboration to create and maintain an online 'Rewilding Knowledge Hub' to engage stakeholders and the public. While rewilding presents an exciting opportunity, it currently lacks a specific evidence base to properly assess its feasibility, value, risks and associated costs. There is, however, a considerable amount of relevant fundamental and applied conservation, ecology, ecohydrology, and socio-economics research that could aid the development of rewilding policy and best-practice. NERC has been an integral funder of much of this research. This Knowledge Exchange project will collate and synthesise the research of academic partners including Prof. Y. Malhi, Prof. D.W. Macdonald, Prof. W. Sutherland, Prof. R. Brazier, Prof. A. Newton, Dr. S. Carver, Dr. P. Jepson, and the applicant Dr. C.J. Sandom. This synthesised knowledge will serve as a primer for a two-way knowledge exchange with the project's practical and policy partners through two workshops on the approaches, value, risks and costs of rewilding. A third workshop will be dedicated to co-produce best-practice guidelines for natural process restoration. Project partners include Rewilding Britain, John Muir Trust, Wild Europe, Woodland Trust, and Conservation Capital. Through stakeholder engagement and the development of best-practice guidelines, land managers will be able to identify and select appropriate cost-effective actions to reinstate upland natural processes as a result of this project. This will result in nature-based socio-economic development in the uplands that cascades downstream with the flow of water.

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  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G1000008
    Funder Contribution: 999,999 GBP

    Drug addiction is a major social and health problem with causes that are both social and biological. The project represents the first stage of a programme of work whose aim is i) to develop methods in non-addicted volunteers for studying forms of addiction and its treatment (experimental medicine), ii) to understand particular biological processes that underlie addictive behaviour, and iii) to identify potential targets for pharmacological or behavioural intervention to combat forms of addictive behaviour. Some of our aims will be delivered within the lifetime of this proposal, while others will be realised in extensions of the work outlined here, and in parallel proposals under the umbrella of the MRC Addiction Research Cluster ?GABA?. In the present proposal we will study people who carry one particular genetic risk for addiction to discover how their behaviour is altered in ways that might increase the likelihood of developing addictions. At the same time, we will study the brain mechanisms involved in the action of this, and related genes, with the hope of finding ways in which the genetic predisposition can be overcome, either with drug-treatment or by changing their risky behaviour.

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