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PHE

Public Health England
109 Projects, page 1 of 22
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MC_PC_19077
    Funder Contribution: 445,720 GBP
    Partners: PHE

    Interventions against the newly emerged coronavirus disease (COVID-19) are urgently required. Antibody approaches are widely recognised as an appropriate method due to their ability to bind proteins which can disrupt entry into cells. Antibodies which are polyclonal, so bind to multiple areas of the protein, are preferential in that small changes in the virus associated with mutations will have little effect compared to monoclonal antibodies which only recognise a single site. Ovine antibodies are suitable for development as large volumes can rapidly be made and they are widely used for treatment for other applications, including antivenoms. For this proposal, we will raise antibodies against the spike protein of the causative agent of COVID-19, termed SARS-CoV-2. The protein will be recombinantly manufactured before being used to immunise sheep. The sheep side will be conducted in Australia due to regulatory issues around BSE, so countries free of BSE need to be used. Once a sufficient level of antibodies are detected in the sheep, they will used as donors to provide plasma samples from which the antibodies can be purified. These will then be used as a therapeutic and tested for their effects against COVID-19 disease progression in a susceptible animal model.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: MC_PC_16091
    Funder Contribution: 60,046 GBP
    Partners: PHE

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0500131
    Funder Contribution: 80,212 GBP
    Partners: PHE

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G0701560
    Funder Contribution: 61,610 GBP
    Partners: PHE

    Resistance to antimicrobials (eg antibiotics) is a significant health problem and is driven by antimicrobial prescribing patterns. The majority of antimicrobial prescribing for humans in the UK is by GPs, but efforts to change prescribing patterns have so far met with limited success. A R+D collaboration is to be established between the key functions of the Health Protection Agency and 3 Universities with complimentary expertise relevant to improving antimicrobial prescribing in primary care. The collaboration will achieve its objectives via 4 mechanisms: - ensuring that best practice guidance on antimicrobial prescribing is available to GPs and other primary care staff and regularly updated. - ensuring that best practice on how to change prescribing in primary care is identified, publicised and regularly updated. - developing and establishing a system for routinely monitoring antimicrobial prescribing in primary care to assess implementation of recommendations and to act as a tool for furure research. - acting as a focus for further research bids in this area. This bid is for a project manager to implement the collaboration and organise bids for funding to develop the 4 strands of work.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: G106/1219
    Funder Contribution: 152,832 GBP
    Partners: PHE

    The co-ordination of a national database of HIV sequences linked with limited HIV-risk factor information, representative of new and undiagnosed HIV infections in the UK will be undertaken to research HIV transmission. Investigative techniques combining epidemiology, evolutionary biology and laboratory techniques (phylodynamics) require development and will be strengthened through building upon methodologies used in localised studies. Tools will be investigated that enable measurement of the extent that homosexual men, who have recently been infected with HIV, are transmitting their infection onwards, relative to homosexual men with longstanding HIV infections. If recently infected HIV-positive men are substantially contributing to onward HIV transmission at a population level, then HIV testing promotion will have limited success as a prevention intervention, since recently infected HIV-positive men will not yet have had the opportunity to have their HIV infection diagnosed. Additionally, the impact of specific groups (such as homosexual men and heterosexuals born-abroad) on the UK population of HIV sequences will be measured and allow prevention efforts to be better targeted. Transmission and spread of drug resistance will be monitored and information on associated risk factors collected. The creation of this resource and the information yielded may have a large impact on the prevention efforts targeted at the UK HIV epidemic.