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University Hospital Heidelberg

140 Projects, page 1 of 28
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 850896
    Overall Budget: 1,492,380 EURFunder Contribution: 1,492,380 EUR
    Partners: University Hospital Heidelberg

    Largely due to the ageing of their populations and changing lifestyles, middle-income countries (MICs) are facing a rapidly increasing burden of heart attacks and strokes. Most of these cardio- and cerebrovascular disease (CCVD) events are preventable through successful treatment of three major risk factors: diabetes, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension. Yet despite the existence of inexpensive and effective medications, only a small minority of adults with these risk factors in MICs successfully transition through the care continuum from screening to effective treatment. There is currently little to no evidence from these settings on what health services interventions are most effective in reducing the loss of patients along the CCVD risk factor care continuum. Focussing on the four most populous MICs – which jointly account for 43% of the world’s population – E4I thus aims to i) determine at which of the main steps in the care continuum – screening, linkage to care, and retention in care – the greatest loss of patients occurs; ii) establish which health services interventions have been most effective in reducing the loss of patients at each of these three care steps; and iii) ascertain the causal effect of reducing the loss of patients along the care continuum on individuals’ health and economic outcomes. To do so, E4I will use novel causal inference techniques from different academic disciplines on large population-based cross-sectional and cohort datasets with jointly over seven million participants, challenging the frequently-held beliefs in public health that only randomised trials can provide causal effect estimates and that cohort data’s principal value is the study of disease aetiology. By generating urgently needed knowledge on how to more effectively deliver proven treatments for a major public health problem in MICs, E4I will decisively advance public health research and has the potential to have an important impact on population health globally.

  • Funder: EC Project Code: 294293
    Partners: University Hospital Heidelberg
  • Funder: EC Project Code: 294213
    Partners: University Hospital Heidelberg
  • Open Access mandate for Publications
    Funder: EC Project Code: 839998
    Overall Budget: 174,806 EURFunder Contribution: 174,806 EUR
    Partners: University Hospital Heidelberg

    Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for over 200 million yearly malaria cases and the major burden is upon African children. Public health strategies to control and ultimately eradicate malaria are very much needed. In Africa, seasonal transmission of this mosquito-borne parasite is very common. Infections in adults are clinically silent whilst in children it generally leads to clinical disease with nearly half a million deaths each year. The dry season represents a major challenge for the parasite’s survival due to the absence of the transmission vector; yet, P. falciparum seems to be capable of maintaining low parasitemias just enough not to kill but not to die. During the dry season, an important fraction of these children remains clinically silent for months despite the decrease in P. falciparum-specific antibody levels. This low parasitemia reservoir is indispensable to spread transmission in the following rainy season. How do parasites not increase to the point of causing clinical malaria in these children during the dry season? We hypothesize that during the dry season with no mosquitoes available to transmit, continuous rounds of P. falciparum blood stage replication lead to a differential gene expression related to cell cycle progression allowing the maintenance of low levels of parasitemia. The Center for Infectious Diseases, University Hospital Heidelberg has an interdisciplinary and translational orientation and is embedded in partnerships with groups in malaria endemic countries, representing a unique environment to execute the objectives of this project. I offer translational expertise in the malaria from my previous experience in malaria endemic areas of Brazil as well as in state-of-the-art laboratories in the US. This ambitious yet feasible project also offers the opportunity for me to broaden my expertise in malaria by acquiring knowledge in new area, which will allow me to build a solid background from which to become an independent researcher.

  • Funder: EC Project Code: 627329
    Partners: University Hospital Heidelberg