auto_awesome_motion View all 2 versions
organization

DECC

The Department Of Energy and Climate Change
Country: United Kingdom
Funder (2)
Top 100 values are shown in the filters
Results number
arrow_drop_down
43 Projects, page 1 of 9
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/M008223/1
    Funder Contribution: 596,155 GBP
    Partners: University of Edinburgh, DECC

    We propose a programme of research leading to the establishment of a new methodology for surveying household energy use nationally, to complement existing methods (e.g., the English Housing Survey and regional equivalents), which leverages the rollout of Smart Meters to achieve cost-effective, detailed understanding of energy use behaviours. The key enablers of this new methodology are: 1) the Smart Meters themselves, 2) advances in semi-supervised disaggregation methods which can infer the behaviours that result in energy use, and 3) other wireless sensors placed in some households to bootstrap the disaggregation methods. The output will be twofold: a validated scalable novel survey method suitable for national rollout, providing significant additional data on energy consumption in UK homes; and 2) an assessment of which variables can be effectively surveyed with this method.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: NE/M008304/1
    Funder Contribution: 129,856 GBP
    Partners: LSE, DECC

    The aim of this project is to visualise information from climate change models so that it can be displayed on an internet "game" called the the 2050 Global Calculator. The aim of the Global Calculator is to energise and inform discussion about energy and climate choices in the lead-up to the UNFCCC climate negotiations in Paris in 2015. The Global Calculator lets you make decisions about the energy system in 2050: should we use lots of nuclear power, or insulate our houses, or become vegetarian? The impact of these choices is then shown in terms of carbon emissions and the effect on the global climate. In the early stages of constructing the Global Calculator, we have already learnt a lot about the different expectations of climate scientists and of policy-makers from the Department for Energy and Climate Change. The target audience for the web tool is businesspeople, who will probably have different expectations again. So what we want to do is to use the Global Calculator to demonstrate those differences, and work towards finding a system that will help all of us to communicate better. That means helping climate scientists design experiments that give answers that are directly relevant for real-world decisions, and helping decision-makers to understand the limits of climate information, so they don't ask for the impossible. Providing a forum for feedback and constructive discussion, by starting this conversation around the Global Calculator, will improve the use of climate information in business and policy.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/K000438/2
    Funder Contribution: 268,958 GBP
    Partners: DECC, DfT, University of Leeds

    Efforts to reduce the emissions from car travel have been hampered by a lack of specific information on car ownership and use. In 2010, the Department for Transport released a dataset containing annual MOT test records for cars from 2005 onwards, with regular updates promised. By providing relatively comprehensive information about British car ownership and use, this dataset provides a key opportunity to address a number of issues in transport and energy debates. For the first time precise links can be made between car use and car type, and changes in use over space and time can be examined on a relatively complete basis. When combined with a wealth of other existing data sets (not least the new information from the 2011 Census), a range of new and important insights should emerge. Having already worked together as a project team to scope the use of this data in a small EPSRC-funded study in 2011, we now propose to use it as a platform upon which to develop a set of interlinked modelling and analysis tasks using multiple sources of vehicle-specific and area-based data. A set of interdependent workpackages will span three years to investigate spatial and temporal differences in car ownership and use, the determinants of those differences, and how levels may change over time and in response to various policy measures. The relationships between car ownership, car use, fuel use and vehicle emissions, and the demographic, economic, infrastructural and socio-cultural factors influencing these will be tested mathematically using spatial statistics, regression modelling and scenario analyses. Linkages will also be made with spatial patterns of domestic gas and electricity usage in order to understand relationships within and between these end-user energy demands. The new analysis capability will be tested through case study evaluation of local transport policies. By enabling car ownership and use to be examined at relatively fine spatial and temporal scales, and via techniques to identify areas sharing important 'background' characteristics, it should be possible to answer key questions for sustainable transport policies such as, what difference to car ownership and use have particular policies achieved (compared with areas where these policies were not in place)? It will also be able to calculate figures for fuel use and emissions to contribute to the development of policies specifically targeted at the most energy intensive or polluting drivers or localities. We will also be able to link energy use from cars, with domestic energy usage through household electricity and gas. This will allow us to build up a much better picture of energy and carbon footprints across the country. When linked to patterns of income, multiple deprivation and other socio-economic factors, there will be insights for the design of much more effective climate and energy policies, and to ensure that the burden of these is borne equitably. The project will be supported by an Applied Statistics Expert Panel, and includes provision for workshops with key stakeholders to help shape the work. The project will also help develop a specification for a possible web-based tool to enable a wide community of users to undertake their own analysis on these sorts of issues, using the data and tools that we develop. In order to achieve our goals, we will develop methods to overcome the challenges of merging a range of important but disparate datasets, based on varying spatial, temporal and other characteristics, and subject to varying issues of data protection and sensitivity. Our scoping study demonstrated that there are very significant technical challenges to be overcome in working with datasets of this size and nature, and a wide range of disciplines may be able to learn from this work. The analysis frameworks and the new scientific understanding delivered will be the important legacies of this project.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/P022820/1
    Funder Contribution: 2,683,310 GBP
    Partners: Imperial College London, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, DECC

    This award supports the scientific activities of the Co-chair of Working Group III (Mitigation) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and scientific members of the Technical Support Unit (TSU). The TSU is co-located at Imperial College London and the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad (IIMA). IPCC is a world body which provides policymakers with assessments of the science of climate change, its impacts, and options for adaptation and mitigation. IPCC offers policymakers a snapshot of what the scientific community understands rather than promoting a particular view. IPCC sets out options from which policymakers may choose in pursuit of their goals, but it does not tell governments what to do. Assessment involves a structured approach to interpreting that knowledge and a synthesis of the scientific findings which in itself constitutes a substantial contribution to knowledge. IPCC operates through three Working Groups (WGs). WG III is concerned with climate change mitigation, i.e. reducing emissions of greenhouse gases and removing them from the atmosphere. Prof Jim Skea was elected co-chair of WG III in October 2015 for a period of seven years along with Prof PR Shukla of IIMA. Their task is to produce the WG III contribution to the Sixth Assessment Report, to contribute to the Synthesis Report along with other WGs, to contribute to a Special Report on the implications of keeping global temperature increases below 1.5 degrees as requested by the UN Climate Convention, and to lead the production of a further special Report on climate change and aspects of land use. Co-chairs coordinate the efforts of hundreds of volunteer authors to produce these reports and gain approval for the final reports from IPCC governments. They are backed up by a TSU comprising scientists and other support staff. For the first time, the WG III TSU is co-located at the institutions of the developed and developing country co-chairs. This award provides support for Professor Jim Skea, the UK co-chair, and members of the scientific staff located in London. A parallel award from the Department of Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), includes official development assistance (ODA) and covers operations and communications costs in London and posts at IIMA. WG III's work covers all aspects of energy, including energy supply technologies, energy demand, energy infrastructure and whole energy systems approaches. The reports also covers agriculture, forestry and land use. To meet this remit, IPCC contributors include physical scientists and engineers but also those from the biological sciences, economists and other social scientists. The scope of IPCC WG III products is wide and they are interdisciplinary in character. The Special Reports on 1.5 degrees and land use, involving collaboration across Working Groups, are exceptionally interdisciplinary. To deliver the products, the co-chairs and the TSU must: scope and set the scientific framework for reports in consultation with governments and other stakeholders; select authors to contribute to the drafting; engage with authors to ensure that the quality of individual report chapter is assured; ensure that review comments by experts and governments are addressed to adequately; lead the drafting of the Summaries for Policymakers which are the most high-profile IPCC outputs; and steer the reports through approval sessions of IPCC involving all member governments. IPCC's activities have a major impact on climate change policy nationally and internationally. The widely cited reports have influenced the development of the UN Climate Convention and are used to inform national policy-making. This award enables the UK and UK science to have a significant influence on climate policy nationally and internationally through the framing and direction provided by the co-chairs and through the efforts of the many UK researchers who will be mobilised to contribute to IPCC.

  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: EP/K000438/1
    Funder Contribution: 806,910 GBP
    Partners: University of Aberdeen, DECC, DfT

    Efforts to reduce the emissions from car travel have been hampered by a lack of specific information on car ownership and use. In 2010, the Department for Transport released a dataset containing annual MOT test records for cars from 2005 onwards, with regular updates promised. By providing relatively comprehensive information about British car ownership and use, this dataset provides a key opportunity to address a number of issues in transport and energy debates. For the first time precise links can be made between car use and car type, and changes in use over space and time can be examined on a relatively complete basis. When combined with a wealth of other existing data sets (not least the new information from the 2011 Census), a range of new and important insights should emerge. Having already worked together as a project team to scope the use of this data in a small EPSRC-funded study in 2011, we now propose to use it as a platform upon which to develop a set of interlinked modelling and analysis tasks using multiple sources of vehicle-specific and area-based data. A set of interdependent workpackages will span three years to investigate spatial and temporal differences in car ownership and use, the determinants of those differences, and how levels may change over time and in response to various policy measures. The relationships between car ownership, car use, fuel use and vehicle emissions, and the demographic, economic, infrastructural and socio-cultural factors influencing these will be tested mathematically using spatial statistics, regression modelling and scenario analyses. Linkages will also be made with spatial patterns of domestic gas and electricity usage in order to understand relationships within and between these end-user energy demands. The new analysis capability will be tested through case study evaluation of local transport policies. By enabling car ownership and use to be examined at relatively fine spatial and temporal scales, and via techniques to identify areas sharing important 'background' characteristics, it should be possible to answer key questions for sustainable transport policies such as, what difference to car ownership and use have particular policies achieved (compared with areas where these policies were not in place)? It will also be able to calculate figures for fuel use and emissions to contribute to the development of policies specifically targeted at the most energy intensive or polluting drivers or localities. We will also be able to link energy use from cars, with domestic energy usage through household electricity and gas. This will allow us to build up a much better picture of energy and carbon footprints across the country. When linked to patterns of income, multiple deprivation and other socio-economic factors, there will be insights for the design of much more effective climate and energy policies, and to ensure that the burden of these is borne equitably. The project will be supported by an Applied Statistics Expert Panel, and includes provision for workshops with key stakeholders to help shape the work. The project will also help develop a specification for a possible web-based tool to enable a wide community of users to undertake their own analysis on these sorts of issues, using the data and tools that we develop. In order to achieve our goals, we will develop methods to overcome the challenges of merging a range of important but disparate datasets, based on varying spatial, temporal and other characteristics, and subject to varying issues of data protection and sensitivity. Our scoping study demonstrated that there are very significant technical challenges to be overcome in working with datasets of this size and nature, and a wide range of disciplines may be able to learn from this work. The analysis frameworks and the new scientific understanding delivered will be the important legacies of this project.