Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

University of Lancaster

University of Lancaster

Funder (3)
Top 100 values are shown in the filters
Results number
arrow_drop_down
51 Projects, page 1 of 11
  • Funder: UKRI Project Code: 10032458
    Funder Contribution: 22,971 GBP

    Abstracts are not currently available in GtR for all funded research. This is normally because the abstract was not required at the time of proposal submission, but may be because it included sensitive information such as personal details.

    more_vert
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 209868
    Funder Contribution: 162,854 GBP

    Psychiatry currently faces a crisis over validity. Current evidence suggests psychiatric diagnoses are not disease entities (as specific causes have not been found), leaving the ontological and epistemological status of psychiatric diagnoses unclear. If not disease entities then what are psychiatric diagnoses and how could we know of them? I will apply philosophy of science, specifically recent interest in neo-Kantianism (including related topics like perspectivism and scientific models) to psychiatry whilst drawing on the history of autism for examples of alternative approaches to psychiatry. Applying neo-Kantianism to psychiatry will provide a sounder conceptual understanding of psychiatric symptoms, diagnosis and causes. This opens up alternative epistemic questions than are currently posed by psychiatry which gives guidance towards resolving the current crisis over validity in psychiatry. My key goals are 1) to provide a neo-Kantian account of symptoms, diagnosis and causes in psychiatry, 2) to illustrate and develop this account through cases drawing upon history of autism, and philosophy of science on model building and perspectivism, 3) to highlight the importance of values in formulating symptoms, diagnosis and causes, 4) to show how my account provides alternative epistemic standards that can help resolve the current crisis over validity in psychiatry. Empirical research has not been able to find specific causes for many mental disorders. Instead massive causal heterogeneity has been uncovered within the domain of psychiatry. This has led to a crisis of confidence concerning psychiatric diagnoses. I will develop a new account of what makes a psychiatric diagnosis legitimate, which draws on an approach in the philosophy of science called 'neo-Kantianism'. This approach emphasises the role played by theories and values when scientists model the world. On this new approach a legitimate psychiatric diagnosis does not need to have a specific underlying cause, and so current concerns regarding the validity of psychiatric diagnoses can be alleviated. I will use the history of autism to look at alternative theories and values to assess if psychiatry could improve the theories and values it employs.

    more_vert
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 077698
    more_vert
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 090678
    Funder Contribution: 78,978 GBP

    No Data Entered

    more_vert
  • Funder: WT Project Code: 097897
    Funder Contribution: 546,839 GBP

    Our ability to transfer reproductive materials, both to facilitate reproduction, and to underpin biomedical research, has grown dramatically in recent years. A coherent, comprehensive and philosophically defensible ethical framework with which to think about the donation and transfer of human reproductive materials is of the highest importance. This programme aims to develop and to provide rigorous arguments for such a framework, and to examine its implications for clinical practice, law, publi c policy, and regulation. Such a framework will be capable of: (a) providing clinicians, policymakers, health professionals and scientists with greater clarity and with a more precise set of arguments, concepts, and terms; (b) informing and improving policy and regulation in the UK (and beyond); and (c) increasing public confidence in, and understanding of, these areas of research and practice. 'Human reproductive materials' is understood broadly here to include not only central cases (e.g . human embryos, ova, and sperm) but also artificial gametes, human reproductive tissue (e.g. ovarian tissue grafts or uterine transplantation), and mitochondrial transfer. Donation and transfer is understood similarly broadly and includes 'rewarded' as well as altruistic transfer, and the use of materials for research and clinical practice. This application builds on the applicants' already extensive research on the ethical and legal issues raised by assisted human reproduction; it provides the Wellcome Trust with a rare opportunity to facilitate the coming together of two leading scholars in bioethics and medical law, in order to undertake a sustained and potentially ground-breaking programme of work.

    visibility33
    visibilityviews33
    downloaddownloads150
    Powered by Usage counts
    more_vert
Powered by OpenAIRE graph
Found an issue? Give us feedback

Do the share buttons not appear? Please make sure, any blocking addon is disabled, and then reload the page.

Content report
No reports available
Funder report
No option selected
arrow_drop_down

Do you wish to download a CSV file? Note that this process may take a while.

There was an error in csv downloading. Please try again later.