project . 2008 - 2010 . Closed

Rapid evolution of phenotypic divergence in fish populations

UK Research and Innovation
  • Funder: UK Research and InnovationProject code: NE/E015212/1
  • Funded under: NERC Funder Contribution: 389,323 GBP
  • Status: Closed
  • Start Date
    01 Jan 2008
    End Date
    31 Dec 2010
Description
Iceland represents a natural laboratory for studying the colonization of freshwater habitats by fish since rivers and lakes all date from the end of the last Ice-Age less than 10,000 years ago. The North Atlantic provided a refuge for species such as arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) which invaded freshwater once the ice retreated. New habitats and the lack of competing species led to the appearance of different forms of Artic charr, called morphs. In particular, 27 discrete populations of dwarf charr have been identified with specialised feeding morphology that enables them to exploit the small larval fissures on the bottom of streams and lakes. Our Icelandic a...
Description
Iceland represents a natural laboratory for studying the colonization of freshwater habitats by fish since rivers and lakes all date from the end of the last Ice-Age less than 10,000 years ago. The North Atlantic provided a refuge for species such as arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) which invaded freshwater once the ice retreated. New habitats and the lack of competing species led to the appearance of different forms of Artic charr, called morphs. In particular, 27 discrete populations of dwarf charr have been identified with specialised feeding morphology that enables them to exploit the small larval fissures on the bottom of streams and lakes. Our Icelandic a...
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